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October 06, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8 Friday, October 6, 1918

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

1979 CADILLAC

Sadness Colors Pioneer Sinai Settlements

(Continued from Page 1)
They were hailed then as
heroic pioneers, fulfilling a
major tenet of the Zionist-
ideal and protecting Israel's
southern reaches for all
times from enemy aggres-
sion. Of course, they were

ANDY BLAU

"Best Deal In Town"

WILSON-CRISSMAN CADILLA C

ALL BUS. MI 4-1930
RES. 642-6836
1350 N. WOODWARD, BIRMINGHAM
C

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE JEWISH
WELFARE FEDERATION OF DETROIT

Nominees to the Board of Governors

Pursuant to the by-laws of the JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION OF DETROIT, the following list
of nominees, selected from the membership of the Federation, eligible for election to the Board of
Governors of the Federation; for a three-year term ending in 1981, is presented herewith to the
Executive director not less than thirty days prior to the Annual Meeting which will take.place on
Monday, November 6, 1978, at Adat Shalom

FOR RE-ELECTION

Lester S. Burton

Carolyn Greenberg-

FOR ELECTION

N. Brewster Broder
Maurice S. Cohen
Dr. Milton H. Goldrath

Rabbi James I. Gordon
Lawrence S. Jackier
Milton J. Miller

Jane Sherman

Other persons may be nominated by petition or petitions signed by not fewer than 25 members of
the Federation and filed with the Executive Director of the Federation not less than ten days prior to
the date of the Annual Meeting. Only one person may be nominated in each petition and no
nomination shall be valid unless the nominee shall have consented to be a candidate.

1978- NOMINATING COMMITTEE

Alan E. Schwartz

Chairman

Louis Berry -
Michael W. Maddin

Dulcie Rosenfeld
Norman Wachter

JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
OF DETROIT

Sol Drachler, Executive Director

163 Madison Avenue, Detroit 48226 965 3939

-

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not protectors. Yamit an d
the surrounding village
were civilian outposts, re
quiring by their very natur e
the protection of Israel' s
army and air force based i n
Sinai.
But in those euphoric
years after the-Six-Day War
no one thought in such
terms. Peace with Egypt
was a remote possibility.
President Anwar Sadat
himself said, on many occa,
sions, that it would not come
in this' generation.
Meanwhile, Yamit
flourished. The settlers
invested time, money,
energy
and love.
Encouraged by the gov-
ernment in Jerusalem,
. others joined them. The
politiCians pledged re-
peatedly that the Sinai
settlements would never
be given up.
Even after Sadat's his-
toric visit to Jerusalem last
Novefnber, the settlers had
reason to believe that Israel
would never yield its Sinai
holdings. Begin himself be-
came an honorary member
- of N one of the agricultural
villages, declaring publicly
that he intended to retire
there when his term of office
ended.
But theie were ominous
murmurings. Prominent
leaders such as Defense
thi Ezer Weizman and
Minisr
Foreign Minister -Moshe
Dayan — for whom Yamit
was a pet- project in the
1960s — began to hint that
if the choice was ever be-
tween peace and the settle-
ments, the settlements
would have to go. When
both returned from Camp
David, they said so flatly.
On the day the Knesset
approved the Camp David
accords, a protest rally was

held in the central square of
Yamit in front of a huge
monument to the 187 Israeli
soldiers of an armored
brigade that broke through
the Egyptian lines in 1967.
Nearly 1,000 residents took _
part. They cheered spokes-
men of the moshavim
movement who told them
not to despair, that there
was still hope.
But at another settle-
ment on the seashore,
some miles west of Yamit,
hope had died. In that
town stands a red granite
monument to 10 Israeli
airmen who were victims
of a crash. One of them
was the son of Justice
Minister Shmuel Tamir.
But he voted to support
the Camp David agree-
ments. If he can abandon his
son's monument, then there
is no hope, the settlers said.
Meanwhile, two groups of
new settlers took over their
homes in recently -built vil-
lages in Sinai even though
electricity has not been in-
stalled. Among them are 28
families of immigrants from
the Soviet Union who are
settling in Priel and 25

.

families from the U.S.,
Great Britain and South Af-
rica who went to Tamei
Yossef. They made the move
now because they feared
that if they waited they
might be stopped by the
authorities.
Agricultural work will go
on for the time being. Crops
must be planted and har-
vested. Business continues
in Yamit, which has dery
veloped into a resort town:.
But much of the spark and
energy has gone out of the
enterprise.
Some families and indi-
viduals are expected to de-
part in the weeks ahead and
new job opportunities will
decline.
When the time comes for
the withdrawal from Sinai,
the settlers will not leave as
refugees. The government
has pledged to resettle them
elsewhere. But there will be
bitterness. Once brave
pioneers, the people of
Yamit and the other vil-
lages see themselves now as
mere bargaining points,
pawns in the game of diplo-
macy who became expenda-
ble.

A Unique Survivor's Story
Is Told yin 7 Dared to Live'

By CHARLEY J. LEVINE
(Copyright 1978, JTA, Inc.)

blonde, Aryan appear-
ance became her tenuous
The sanguinary tempest passport to sur v ival and
that was the Holocaust so she clung to life tenaci-
utterly exploded all ously.
standards of normalcy that
And so Roma (Sandra)
it has taken decades even.to Brand became Cecylia
begin to reorder the percep- Szarek. She fled her con-
tions of what transpired in demned family and friends
those dread days. Morality without a moment to spare
ceased to be except in iso- and entered an anguished
lated individual instances. but unchained existence as
The ugliness of homicide a factory administrator in
gave way to the wholesale Warsaw.- She lived in a pre-
bestiality of genocide. The carious society within -a
world careened wildly, this society, encountering more
way and that, until estab- than a few Jewish former
lished values and realities acquaintances, all in the
spun topsy-turvy or faded like guise of Polish
altogether.
Catholics, in the least likely
Foilr decades after the of _situations.
Holocaust shuddered to a
Slowly, a network of these
halt, humanity still Marranos of the Third Reich
searches for understanding. is formed. Covert Jewish-
In this quest, the few sur- ness stubbornly persists, as
vivors of Hitler's horrors are always it has under the
our only certified guides. most extraordinary of con-
One such narrator, whose ditions.
Always fearful of expO-
compassion is matched only
by her adroit storytelling sure but relatively safe
ability, is Sandra Brand. "I (relative to the plight of
Dared To Live" (Shengold) those inside the - ghetto
is her unique autobiog- walls), Roma Brand main-
raphy.
tained her sense of respon-
"I Dared To Live" is - spe- sibility to fellow Jews. She
cial in some respects for hid her true identity but
what it is not . . . it is not never once toyed with thi" —\,.:
another inside story of the notion of real assimilatio
And so, in episode after
Warsaw Ghetto revolt, or of
the uprising by Jewish pris-. harrowing episode, she
oners at Treblinka . . . it is smuggled messages and
not a retelling of illegal material into the ghetto.
aliya to Eretz Yisrael or of Like Queen Esther_of old,
midnight raids against she bravely plotted and
German convoys. These cajoled to save 25 Jews
stories must be told, and here, three there.
But the heroine was not
they are.
pigeon-holed into one di-
Sandra Brand's story is mension that was solely
even more compelling Jewish. She was also a wife
because it has never been and mother, a competent
told before. She left her administrator, and a caring,
father's Hasidic house- feeling woman. It is in this
hold, tearfully parted
from her - husband and latter respect that Roma's
tragic romance with a Ger-
young son, when it be-
man officer who becomes an
came apparent that as- anti-Nazi operative comes
suming a false identity as to the fore as a vivid and
a non-Jew was her only sensual highlight of the
'hope for escape. Her book: .

rn

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