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September 01, 1978 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH tiEjltS

36 frtda1 Sanibel- 1, 1918

Israel Changes Her Spokesmen at the UN

YOU
BA
R R WEDDIN A G-

LBU
FINER

spokesmen for the Arab
states at the UN — in addi-
tion to the spokesmen for
the Palestine Liberation
Organization and the Arab
League — and fair, objec-
tive reporting requires the
comments of the Israeli
spokesman.
In the last three years a
very familiar question
among UN correspondents
has been, "Did you see
Tuvia?" — referring to
Israel's
Saar,
Tuvia
spokesman at the United
Nations, who is returning to
Israel after a very engaging
— and successful — term in
office since 1975.
Saar, 42, a well-known
radio broadcaster and
TV personality in Israel,
said in an interview with
the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that he viewed
the job of a UN spokes-
man as very "critical"
because "politically Is-
rael has no chances at the
world organization."

By YITZHAK RABI

NEW YORK (JTA)

WILL U

"
W
WHIN PHC"°"APHID
IN ER
AND ASSOCIATES

357-1010



One of the "items" most in
demand among the United
Nations press corps is the
spokesman for the Israeli
UN Mission. Israel is al-
most always in the head-
lines and a good quote or a
background explanation is
almost a must.
Besides, there are 21

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The Arabs, he added,
"have an automatic major-
ity and they can pass almost
any resolution. Therefore,
Israel strives to use the UN
as an international arena to
explain its views and atti-
tudes. And in that connec-
tion, the spokesman plays
an important role. He is the
instrument to convey Is-
rael's message to the public
through the media. The
task is invariably compli-
cated since the Arabs have
sophisticated and elaborate
propaganda machinery at
the UN."
Together with Ambas-
sador Chaim Herzog, who is
already back in Israel after
representing Israel at the
UN since 1975, Saar ac-
cepted the challenge of the
Arab propaganda by in-
creasing contacts with the
media. "It was apparent
that the media wanted in-
formation from us, but it
was mutual. We were no
less willing — in fact, eager
— to give," Saar explained.
And with an articulate
and witty ambassador as
Herzog, he added, the job of
"selling" Israel improved
every day, with frequent
press conferences, press re-
leases and special inter-
views on radio and TV.
The collaboration be-
tween Saar and Herzog
started a long way back,
in the days prior to the
Six-Day War. Saar at that
time was in charge of all
news coverage of the war
on Israel Radio and he
brought Herzog in as a
commentator— ajob that

made Herzog a name in
every Israeli household.
When Herzog was ap-
pointed UN Ambassador
he decided that the
spokesman for the Mis-
sion must be a media per-
sonality. Saar was his
choice.
According to Saar, most of
the correspondents at the
UN — an assortment of
world journalists — are
sympathetic to Israel.
"There are those who are
hostile to Israel and do not
conceal it," he said, "but
they are not many. Most of
the correspondents —
excluding the Arabs who
were not talking to me —
are understanding toward
Israel in one way or an-
other. But many of the jour-
nalists are required to write
in the 'spirit' of their paper,
which is not always pro-
Israeli, although privately,
they express deep support of
Israeli policies."
Saar said, in reply to a
question, that there was no
major change in the atti-
tude of the Arab correspon-
dents after Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat's
historic visit to Jerusalem.
"The only Arab correspon-
dent that started talking to
me was the Egyptian corre-
spondent of Al Aharam. But
the Arab spokesmen and
reporters ignore me.
'After Sadat's visit the
Egyptian UN spokesman
agreed to meet me at his
New York apartment. We
met for a conversation
which was arranged by a
mutual journalist friend."

Asked about the high
lights of his service, Saa
said: "Off the cuff, I can sa:
now that Herzog tearing t
pieces the document equat
ing Zionism with racism or
the stage of the General As
sembly was a very touching
and exciting moment, al
though we prepared the ful
'act' in advance. Anothe
exciting moment was at th,
Security Council on the de
bate on the Entebbe rescui
operation. The Arabs caller
the meeting to condemn Is
rael, but the end was tha
we prevented even the pre
sentation of a resolution de
ploring Israel, and the Se
curity Council adjournel
even without considering i
vote. It was a victory for jus
tire."
But there were, o
course, many moments o
frustration. "It was frus
trating when Israel had
'good case' but the auto
matic majority was sim
ply against us. It wa:
dismaying to see demo
cratic, progressive coun
tries voting against Is
rael, or simply staying it
the hall in order not tc
participate in the vote,'
Saar said.
Saar, who returns to wort
for Israel's TV as a produce :
and moderator of a weekl'
political live show, admit
ted that in his view Israe
does not allocate enougl
personnel and budget for in
formation and propaganda
at the UN. "The UN is at
important arena and Israe
has to utilize it to tha
maximum," he observed.

New Commemoratives Issued

NEW YORK — The Is-
rael Ministry of Communi-
cations has issued a number
of new commemoratives, in-
cluding a series of Pat-
riarchs of the Bible in time
for the holidays.
The Patriarchs, part of Is-
raell'festival stamp series,
depict Abraham, Isaac and
Jacob. The stamps come in
several denominations.
The government has also
issued an IL 5.10 stamp in
honor of social welfare serv-
ices in Israel. The colorful
stamp was issued in
August, in conjunction with
the 19th world conference of
the International Council
on Welfare Services which
was held in Jerusalem.
T■ ko additional stamps

100 U.S. Teens
to Study in Israel

NEW YORK — More
than 100 young people be-
tween the ages of 15 and 17
recently flew to Israel for a
one-year program of special
high school study under the
direction of the Department
of Education and Culture of
the American Section of the
World Zionist Organiza-
tion.
The students included
Maurine Neiberg of East
Lansing and Elliott Rosen-
baum of Southfield.

He who etw n- evil for
evil acts wrongly; he should
be patient, and let God help
him.

in the series honoring
prominent figures in
modern Israel's history
were released, honoring
two rabbis.
The stamps, in the IL 2
denomination, honor Rabbi
Abraham Isaac Ha-Cohen
Kook and Rabbi Benzion
Meir Hai Ouziel.
Rabbi Kook emigrated
from Latvia and was chief
rabbi of Jaffa before World
War I. Unable to return
from a trip to Europe during
the war, he helped in Zionist
efforts in England which led
to the Balfour Declaration.

After the war, he served as
Ashkenazic chief rabbi of
Jerusalem and then first
Ashkenazic chief rabbi of
the Holy Land.
He was also active in the
Jewish National Fund and
Mizrachi.
Rabbi Ouzeil, Sephardi
Chief Rabbi of the Holy
Land from 1939 to 1953,
was a native of
Jerusalem.
He was a central figurein
Mizrachi, a Sephardi Union
delegate to three Zionist
Congresses and a member of
the Zionist Executive.

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