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June 30, 1978 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6 Friday, June 30, 1018

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

VERTICAL BLINDS
SHEER BLINDS
WOVEN WOODS
CUSTOM DRAPES

SHADES and BEDSPREADS

LAMINATED SHADES

Since
1952

AND

SAVE
UP TO

35 0

BLINDS

HURTIG WINDOW INTERIOR

BIGGEST SELECTIONS IN OUR SHOWROOM

OR FREE HOME SERVICE —

CALL

559-8209

1978 Cadillac; a
better buy or
lease than ever at

GLASSMAN
OLDSMOBILE

2800 Telegraph Rd.

354-3300

Terkel Volume Now in Paperback

Studs Terkel, author, ac-
tivist, ex-soap opera actor
and disc jockey has turned
listening into an art, and he
shows his expertise in
"Talking to Myself: A
Memoir of My Times," pub-
lished in hardcover by
Pantheon Books.
Now available in paper-
back by Pocket Books, the
oral historian's work is an
unusual self-portrait — an
anecdotal autobiographical
trip through life, including
reflections of his childhood
in a seedy but colorful
Chicago boarding house,
and through his careers as
actor, discjockey-and televi-
sion host.
As in his previous books,
"Division Street: America,"
"Hard Times" and "Work-
ing", Terkel has presented a
a new portrait of America, a
mosaic of voices, unlike
traditional historical vol-
umes. It is a light compen-
dium of funny moments,
bittersweet scenes as well
as an overview of the many
types of people who make
America so unique.
"Talking to Myself"
cuts across worlds, years
and the vast spectrum of
people that Terkel has
known, from workers to

SENIOR CITIZENS

interested in

APARTMENT-HOTEL LIVING

are cordially invited to an old-fashioned

Tekoah Recalls
Soviet Diplomat

TEL AVIV (ZINS)
Soviet diplomat Arkady
Sevchenko, who refused to
return to Moscow and is re-
maining in America, has
exhibited a sympathy and
concern for Israel, according
to Yosef Tekoah, former
head of Israel's delegation
to the UN.
Tekoah said that Sev-
chenko was the only Soviet
diplomat with whom he was
able to maintain friendly
personal relations. They
had a number of talks about
the condition of the Jews in
the Soviet Union and the
state of Israel.
According to Tekoah,
Sevchenko conceded that
there is anti-Semitism in
Soviet Russia, but he said
that anti-Semitism is rife
mainly among the "old
guard" in Russia and that
the newer generation does
not seem to be influenced so
much by anti-Semitic prop-
aganda.
Tekoah said, "He (Sev-
chenko) held a number of in-
formal talks with me on all
sorts of problems, but I have
the impression that he
would afterwards convey
almost every word that we
talked about to his
superiors in Moscow."

Bias Worries
Swedish Jews

July 4th
PICNIC

12 noon to 3 p.m.
at

CWB

28301 FRANKLIN RD.
inspect Franklin Club —
and be our guests at a gala

July 4th PICNIC
FOOD-MUSIC-CELEBRATION

f or informa tion
8
CAL L

famous stars, from Nobel
Prize winners to ordi-
nary folk.
"Talking to Myself'
merits a special place in
American history collec-
tions since it renders a per-
sonal view, in which the
people play a more impor-
tant role in the development
of America than events.

1 0

i‘v 1.1c;‘

JERUSALEM — Follow-
ing his recent European
visit, S.J. Kreutner,
director-general of Keren
Hayesod-United Israel Ap-
peal, reported increasing
anti-Semitism in Sweden.
Kreutner said Arab prop-
aganda has made Sweden's
16,000 Jews feel uneasy and
that anti-Semitic incidents,
virtually unknown in Swe-
den, have been reported in
recent months.
A number of Swedish
Jewish youth signed a letter
printed in a newspaper say-
ing that the creation of Is-
rael was a mistake and that
antagonistic feelings to-
ward Israel prevented their
own acceptance in the
Swedish community.

"Torah in its broad and
true sense — life permeated
by Torah and Torah per-
meated by life — cannot be
realized except by Israel as
a nation and by individuals
organically related to the
nation."
—Samuel Haim Landau

• .4'7

Boris Smolar's

`Between You
. . . and Me

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA
(Copyright 1978, JTA, Inc.)

THE ANGRY DISPUTE: The controversial issue of
whether American Jewry should aid Soviet Jews permitted
to leave the USSR for Israel but who change their minds en
route to Israel — preferring to proceed to the United States
— is now developing into an angry dispute between the
Jewish Agency in Jerusalem and American Jewish com-
munity leaders.
The issue has been a subject of fruitless secret talks for
quite some time. With the number of Jewish emigrants
from Russia not increasing and the proportion of "drop-
outs" among them mounting— it is now reaching about 60
percent — Leon Dulzin, chairman of the Jewish Agency,
has brought out the issue into the open in full force.
The 'transmigrants" — as the drop-outs are now being
formally called — seek aid from the JDC and HIAS offices
in Rome and Vienna. HIAS helps them with the formalities
needed to secure a U.S. visa; the JDC maintains them until
their visas are granted.
THE "TRANSMIGRANT" ISSUE: Last year, some
7,000 Soviet Jews passed through the JDC facilities in
Rome. Right now there are about 4,000 stranded in Rome.
Their number will increase with every transport of Jews
coming out of the Soviet Union and opting for emigration to
the United States. The "transmigrant program" cost the
JDC about $5.5 million last year. Based on the current
availability of U.S. visas — and on the assumption that the
present rate of emigration from the USSR will continue —
the JDC estimates that there will be a need for more than
15,000 U.S. visas and an expenditure of $20 million in the
next 18 months.
ARGUMENTS AND COUNTER-ARGUMENTS: The
Jewish Agency in Israel is, naturally, unhappy about the
fact that so many of the Jews who come out from the Soviet
Union with visas to Israel remain in Rome and are being
assisted there to emigrate to the United States. Jewish
Agency leaders have therefore started a campaign seeking
to influence leaders of the Anveris•n Jewish community to
use pressure on the JDC and BIAS to cease giving aid to
Jewish transmigrants in Rome and Vienna, unless their
Soviet exit visas show that they had applied in Moscow to
go to the U.S.
This campaign is meeting with strong opposition on the
part of leaders of Jewish communities in the U.S. They are
critical —on humanitarian grounds—of the Jewish Agen-
cy's attempt to sway American Jewry from helping Soviet
Jews who prefer to proceed to the United States rather than
to Israel. Some of their arguments run as follows:
• What is involved are human beings who have sacrificed
for freedom. It is a moral imperative for American Jewry to
help them. Orthodox Jews assert that helping Jewish
drop-outs is in the spirit of the ancient Jewish tradition of
"Pidyon Shvuiim" (Redemption from Captivity).
• Even if American Jewish organizations shduld refuse
to help drop-outs in Rome and Vienna, there are American
non-Jewish relief agencies operating there which would be
only too willing to give the necessary aid to the Jewish
transmigrants since the U.S. government is funding such
aid. It would be a black mark for American Jewry if Jews in
need would have to turn to non-Jewish agencies for help.
• The assistance given by JDC and HIAS to the drop-outs
costs the American Jewish community very little since a
large percentage is reimbursed by the U.S. government
which also advances the cost of transportation by plane to
New York to be repaid later in installments by the trans-
migrants — through the HIAS — if they can afford to do so
after they settle in the United States and become fully
absorbed.
Dulzin, who leads the present intensified Jewish Agency
campaign against assisting the drop-outs, claims that the
growing number of Soviet Jewish emigrants changing
their minds to go to the U.S. instead of Israel may lead to
the cloSing by the Soviet government of its doors to all
Jewish emigration. American Jewish leaders reply that the
Kremlin seems to be well aware of the drop-out issue, and
that its actions appear to indicate that locally the Soviet
authorities know more or less who will or will not continue
on to Israel, yet the number of emigration permits issued to
Jews is now substantially increasing. The prevailing sen-
timent among U.S. leaders is that no matter how one may
deplore the decision of some Soviet Jews not to go to Israel,
their right to determine their own destiny must be recog-
nized and respected.

• .i..;..••• ■•

JEWISH naTionaL Fun°.

27308 Southfield Rd. 557-6644 r
Southfield, Mich. 48076

Sun. Closed July & Aug.

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