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April 14, 1978 - Image 43

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

44 Friday, April 14, 1918

THE DETROIT JEWISH HEWS

Non-Residents Assisted by the Jewish Home for Aged

Socialization — interac-
tion with other people —
can be as important to the
mental health of older per-
sons as proper nutrition is to
their physical well-being.
So it is socialization that
is the key component of the

FELDBRO

Day Program at the Jewish
Home for Aged, a member
agency of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation supported
by the Allied Jewish
Campaign:Israel Emergen-
cy Fund.
"Most of the participants

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in the Day program live
alone and most of them have
limited social contacts,"
said Penny Harris, director
of the activity. "It's hard for
them to get out and about
without help. So socializa-
tion is one of the most im-
portant aspects of the prog-
ram.

"The
participants
didn't know each other
when they started com-
ing here, but they've be-
come a very cohesive
group," she said. "It's ob-
vious when they arrive in
the morning that they're
concerned about each
other. If someone's been
out sick, the others will
ask how she is and when
she will be coming back.
Some of them have each
other's phone numbers
so they can communicate
during the week."

The day program, which
began last June, is aimed at
older adults who are able to
live independently, but who
can benefit from some struc-
tured activities and special
services during the day.
Participants can provide
their own transportation to
Borman Hall, or they can
travel in a special van that
picks them up at their
homes.
They can come as often as
five days a week, though
most are enrolled for two or
three days.
When they arrive at
_Borman Hall they are given

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The senior adults may
take part in all the
scheduled activities at the
Home, including the shel-
tered workshop, where they
can earn a modest wage for
doing simple tasks for local
industries.
"They do have special
needs, though, because
they're not here at night,"
Ms. Harris said. "Because
the residents have evening
programs, we never used to
schedule anything right
after lunch. But the day
people can't go to their
rooms at that time like the
residents can, and they
asked for something to do,
so now we always have
something scheduled in the
early afternoon besides the
hobby shop and workshop.
"Residents can attend any
of these programs, of course,
and if the day people would
rather just sit and chat, or
knit, or take a little nap in
the lounge, that's fine.
"The program isn't struc-
tured to keep them busy
every minute of the day,"
she said. "We want them to
have time to relax and
socialize too,"

"It's easy work, a sociable
activity, and it makes the
older people feel useful" Ms.
Harris said. "Many of they
had been quite active in
volunteer organizations
when they were younger
and they like to feel
needed."
Wednesday afternoon is a
time for discussion at Bor-
mal Hall, an activity led by

MiiTHarris' assistant, Evan

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"We have about 15 day
people here each day,"
Ms. Harris said. "Since
we started in June we've
served about 60 persons.
Some have been here
since we started; they call
themselves 'old-timers.'
They range in age from 69
to 92, with most in their
early 80's, and they come
from all backgrounds.

For those who like
more structured activity,
Borman Hall has started
a volunteer program to
aid the American Cancer
• Society. When they're not
otherwise involved, "day
people" and residents
can keep busy preparing
Cancer Society literature
for distribution:

DISCOUNT PRICES ON ALL
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We Have Doctor Brown

a continental breakfast at
the Nosh Nook snack bar
run by the Home's volun-
teers. Lunch and dinner are
also provided in the main
dining room before par-
ticipants leave at 6 p.m.

8
49c

pt.

Fishman, and volunteer
Elsie Harold. The topic of
their talk is "Jewish Roots."
Sitting in a large circle at
the back of the Borman Hall
lobby, the group members,
both residents and day
program participants, dis-
cuss the history of Detroit
Jewry as they remember it.
A hand-held microphone
hooked up to a loudspeaker
lets everyone be heard
clearly. The group attracts
about two dozen persons.

Other regularly
scheduled activities in-
clude movies, a drama
program, science de-
monstrations, arts and

In the top photograph Borman Hall social worker
Jean Epstein is shown participating in the weekly
discussion group for residents and day program
members. In the bottom photograph, Penny Harris,
Day Program director, helps some of her program's
participants organize American Cancer Society liter-
ature.
crafts and the Home's said she enjoys the discus-
once-a-month cocktail sion group and music prog-
parties.
rams especially.

"When the weather's a
little nicer we take the day
members on field trips,"
Mrs. Harris said. Last
summer the group went for
a boat ride in Kensington
Metropark, and in
November, they went to
Book Fair at the Jewish
Community Center.
"We're
constantly
evaluating our programs to
provide the kind of activity
the participants want," Ms.
Harris said. "I see them
every morning when they
arrive, and my assistant
and I hold meetings with
them once or twice a
month."
Sophie Shifrin, an "old-
timer" who's proud of hav-
ing been part of the day
program since a week after
it began, said she's very
pleased with it. "I like it
very much," she said. "So
many people just don't know
what to do with themselves.
This keeps you busy." Mrs.
Shifrin, who comes to the
Home three days a week,

Another woman re-
counted how she got in-
volved in the day program.

"My husband died five
years ago, and I was
doing all right until last
year," she said. "Then I
lost interest in cooking,
and I wasn't going out or
seeing anyone. I got my-
self in a shell, so my son
enrolled me. I come three
days a week, and the
program makes the day
seem shorter."

• Ms. Harris emphasized
that the day program is not
an alternative to a nursing
home.
"People who need nursing
home care are either physi-
cally or mentally unable to
care for themselves she
said. "The day people are
capable of living indepe-
dently with support.
"Some of them will never
need a nursing home. For
others, the program can
postpone the need to enter a
home; it can keep thenago-
ing."

Lest We Forget!

By MERIAM MARGOLIS

The last shot fired, the Ghetto stilled,
But not the voices of thousands killed!
From agonizing graves they rise
And fling at tyrants defiant cries!
They tell a tale of fire and blood
In struggle with Madman's terror flood.
They tell how, in unequal fight,
They put to shame the Nazi might!
Their anguished and untimely death
Shall stir mankind's condemning wrath.
In us and in all those to come
These martyred heroes shall live on!
Their resistance, in Hall of Fame
Sanctified the Jewish name.
Their fight for justice we shall not quit!
Their flames of freedom we must keep lit!
Their legacy to keep alive,
Their memory yearly to revive,
This we must vow to maintain
That they shall not have died in vain!
Their motto,
To live in dignity, to die with honor,"
Must never again suffer dishonor.
This goal before us we must set
Lest we forget! Lest we forget!. .
. _

;

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