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April 07, 1978 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6:1 Friday, April 7, 1978

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Births

March 31 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Dankanics
(former Detroiter Judith
Gelfand) of Lebanon, N.J., a
daughter, Laura Ellen.

Mrs. Gary Gilbert (former
Detroiter Karen Boxer) of
Shoreview, Minn., a daugh-
ter, Marcy Heather.
• • •
March 29 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Smith
(Rosaline Janowski), 1835
Torquay, Royal Oak, a son,
Marc Nathan.
• • •
March 29 — To Dr. and
Mrs. Marshall Solomon
(Marlene Hecker), 26208
Franklin Pointe Dr., South-
field, a son, Michael Todd.

•• •

March 30 — To Mr. and

RABBI S. ZACHARIASH

Specialized

MOHEL

In Horne or Hospital

557-9666

RABBI DR. LEO

March 28 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Stuart Lockman
(Deena Young) of Birmin-
gham, a daughter, Susan
Rachel.

GOLDMAN

Expert Mohe!

Serving Howdah and Kane

U 2-4444

547-8555

March 26 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Ira Freedman (Sandra
Fogel), 3135 Evergreen Dr.,
Royal Oak, a daughter,
Shana Rose.

Cantor Sidney

RUBE

Certified Mabel

358 - 1426 or 357-5544

March 24 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Fredenthal
(Gloria Brant), former De-
troiters of Katy, Texas, a
son, Daniel Diamond.

Cantor SAMUEL

GREENBAUM
MOHEL

Certified

• •

March 23 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Cherkasky
(Janice Meyer), 2757
Windemere, Birmingham, a
son, Bryan Seth.

5. , ..ng Homes & Hospacds

399-7194 — 547-7970

REV. HERSHL

ROTH

...

March 22 — To Dr. and
Mrs. Howard Rossman
(Randie Shiffman), 21625

Certified Mabel

557-0888

lr
hih2-v-

57-7629

45 Vg .1) e Shoes
,

tots ihrti teens

doctors

shoe

prescripTionS

correctly

• 054c34

•t..r traits

• kWh pUret $

•detrer

filled

neaciouartem for

C
C apezio danceviedr •

chAiLte-tiLo

baba

clonskm

•lai r644'5

553-1401

la•nble at favongton illfanniagton

Baby World's

rgi,Braita

Green Hill, Farmington
Hills, a son, David Lee.

March 20 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Si man (Cheryl
Wander), 14771 Borgman,
Oak Park, a son, Jeffrey
Jay.
•• •
March 20 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Alan Rothstein (Alissa
Torgow) of Oak Park, a
daughter, Dena Faye.
•• •

March 17 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Alan B. Sarko (Gwen
M. Grossman of Utica, N.Y.)
of Southfield, a daughter,
Tracy Robin.

March 16 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Jerry Katz (Dianne
Stein) of Farmington Hills,
a son, Eric Michael.
• • •
March 9 — To Mr. and
Mrs. Rick Brenner (Judy
Kerwin) of Farmington
Hills, a daughter, Danielle
Elyse.

Technion Body
Slates Program

Detroit Chapter of the
American Technion Society
will have a film night,
whose theme is "From
Wasteland to Food Expor-
ter," 7:45 p.m. Wednesday
at the Holiday Inn, South-
field.
The program will feature
documentaries, including
"Israel —. 20th Century
Miracle," and a review of
the country's agricultural
history. Dr. Simon Braun,
who is on sabbatical from
the Technion, is program
chairman.
The public is invited free
of charge.

Ms. Kaminsky
Leaves EMU Post

Mildred Kaminsky, a cer-
tified consulting
psychologist and an as-
sociate professor in the de-
partment of educational
psychology, will retire from
-her position at Eastern
Michigan University April
25 after seven years of ser-
vice to the university.

NEW Teen Center

BEDROOM FURNITURE FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES
by FAMOUS brands like . . .

Bassett

schodfie kj

min

Miff
WSW) 6N TEENS
588-2333
126 E. 14 MILE RD., CLAWSON

(2 MILES EAST OF WOODWARD)

Reading Readiness in Center's
Program for Nursery Students

"V" was the letter of the
week, and several children
walked around squeezing
plastic "Mr. V" dolls. In the
"reading readiness center"
children traced large letter
Vs and colored them-with
crayons. In the "quiet
center" a child rocked in a
miniature chair while a re-
cord, "Mr. V and His Velvet
Vest," played on the
phonograph. The children
also would spend time in the
"cooking center" where
vegetables — a food featur-
ing the letter of the week —
would be prepared.
The scene was the nur-
sery school at the Jewish
Community Center, a
Jewish Welfare Federation
member agency supported
by the Allied Jewish
Campaign-Israel Emer-
gency Fund. The school
combines organized class
activities with more un-
structured, but still super-
vised, individual activities
which the chooses.

The first 75 minutes of
each 31 hour school day are
devoted to "Centers." The
large nursery school area is
divided into smaller units;
there is a science center, a
role-playing center with
doll houses, a construction
center with large wooden
blocks, a puzzle center, an
arts and crafts center and a
"theme center." The latter
may be devoted to activities
connected with an upcom-
ing Jewish holiday, or the
theme of the week might re-
late to a field trip recently
taken.
"We try to relate most
of the activities at the
centers to the letter of the
week," said nursery
supervisor Joyce Eps-
tein, who, with the help of
teachers Carolyn Dan-
goor and Wendy
Greenspan, directs the
25-30-child program.
"If the letter of the week is
"M", for example, we might
make masks in the art
center, learn about mice in
the science center, do some-
thing with marbles in the
math center," Ms. Epstein
said.

During the "centers"
period the children are free
to choose among the diffe-
rent activities, some of
which require the help of a
teacher, some of which can
be done alone.
After the first long, un-
structured period come
three 20-minute "class"
periods, where the 3-to-5-
year-old children are di-
vided into small groups ac-
cording to age. There is a
"group" period, for story-
telling or quiet games, a
"snack" period and a "re-
cess" period for exercise and
active games.
One marvelous thing
about our program is that
we have all the facilities
of the Center at our dis-
posal," said Cal Lefton,
the Center's director of
group services.
"During the group period
a class might go into the

In top photograph teacher Carolyn Dangoor and
her pupils work at one of the Jewish Community
Center Nursery School's learning centers. Joyce Eps-
tein, nursery supervisor at the Jewish Community
Center, is seen in the bottom photograph with six of
her charges. Two of the boys in front hold plastic
alphabet dolls which help prepare the children for
reading.

Center library for a story. • days. Transportation ser-
During the recess period vice is available.
Beginning in Sep-
they sometimes use the in-
tember, the nursery
door track. Regular joggers
school will also offer -
have gotten used to seeing
licensed day care for
five-year-olds sharing the
working parents. Chil-
track with them. We use the
dren may be dropped off
swimming pool too, though
at the Center as early as 8
not on a regular basis."
a.m. weekdays and
Friday's program is spe-
picked up again as late as
cial. After the free-choice
6 p.m. For half the day the
period and cooking period
child will participate in
there is a movie or a guest to
the regular nursery
speak to the children. Then
school program, Lefton
comes preparation for
said. Child care will, be
Shabat. The children say
provided for the rest of
the blessings — over grape
the day.
juice and halla — and sing
Parents interested in the
Sabbath songs. Dancing is
Center nursery school will
also a part of the weekly
have a chance to inspect the
celebration.
facilities and meet with the
The school operates three teachers and supervisor at
mornings a week — five an open house 1-4 p.m. April
when enrollment is higher 16.
For information, contact
— and five afternoons.
Children can enroll for two, Cal Lefton at the Jewish
three or five days a week, Community Center, 661-
and parents can choose the 1000.

Parents of American Israelis
Forming a Michigan Chapter

The Michigan chapter of
American Parents of
Arperican Israelis (APAI)
will meet 1 p.m. April 30 at
Cong. Beth Shalom to hold
an organizational meeting
and elect officers.
Patterned after a prog-
ram of the South African
Jewish community, APAI
aids those planning to make
aliya and those who have
already gone to Israel by
keeping in contact and aid-
ing in the absorption pro-
cess.
The group is working
to aid families in finding
reasonable quarters
while visiting their chil-
dren in Israel and is
proposing reduced air
fares through special
charter flight arrange-
ments.
The chapter is under the
sponsorship of the Israel
Aliya Center and already
has 34 members.
For information about
APAI, write Barbara Lef-

ton, 27335 Huntington,
Huntington Woods, or Fred
Erlebacher, 10104 Lincoln,
Huntington Woods 48070.

Seek Volunteers
for JNF Project

Volunteers are needed for
the spring clearance of
Jewish National Fund Blue
Boxes to take place April 24
through May 28, it was an-
nounced by Betty Silver-
man, general Blue Box
chairman.
At the same time, the
JNF is seeking to place
more boxes in homes. De-
troit's quota is to place 1,000
more boxes, Mrs. Silverman
said.
Persons wishing to volun-
teer or to place a box in their
homes may call the JNF,
968-0820.

The Torah speaks in the
language of the people.

—The Talmud

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