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April 07, 1978 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

48 Friday, April 1, 1918

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Dead Sea Development Planned

By MOSRE RON

The Jewish News Special
Israel Correspondent

TEL AVIV — The local
councils of Tamar in the re-
gion of the Dead Sea are the
biggest of dozens of similar
land councils in the country.
The Tamar councils control
more than two million
dunams, but in the Tamar
region only 1,000 people
live.
The region is waiting for
the realization of develop-

LARRY FREEDMAN

s
Orche tra sad Entertainment

_ 647-2367

ment plans for tourism.
The hotel in Ein Bokek at
the Dead Sea has 650 rooms,
and is 85 percent occupied
throughout the year. The
hotel is frequented by
tourists from abroad, who
like Israelis enjoy the dry
air and mineral baths.
But tourism develop-
ment has been limited by
the shortage of drinking
water. Now a 10-inch
water pipe-line will be
built and two water re-
servoirs established.
According to these plans,
30,000 inhabitants could
move into this region within
the next 20 years. A center
for tourism will be built in
Zeelirri, which will be a new

town with 25,000 inhabit-
ants.
In Ein Bokek, two addi-
tional hotels will be built.
During the next 20 years 17
hotels with 3,000 rooms are
projected for the Dead Sea
region. Zeelim, close to
Masada, could have 50
hotels with 10,000 rooms.
The development plan takes
into account not only
tourists from abroad but
many Israelis. The plan in-
cludes the building of new
agricultural settlements in
this region, four around
Neot Hakikar, where there
are 16,000 dunams of land
for agriculture.
The first pioneers of the
new kibutzim will start
work soon.
The region will also need
new roads, cafes and enter-
tainment centers. The reg-
ion is suitable for excur-
sions to the ancient places
and marvelous panoramas
from Ein Gedi to MaAada,

trom

Neo

Lehman Award

K & B ASSOCIATES

NEW YORK—Frederic}
A. Klingenstein, active it
Jewish communal affairs it
New York, will be presentec
the Herbert H. Lehmat
Human Relations Award bl
the American Jewisi
Committee on April 18.

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Such is the state of nature
in the Judean Mountains
although in newly-
developed areas old timers
still look in vain for their
favored cyclamens. Though
unable to preserve these
particular flowers within
her city limits, Jerusalem is
trying hard to recapture

$119
lb.

8 Minute

DRY PRUNES

69c

Deputy Mayor, Jerusalem

JERUSALEM — The
travel agents' slogan — fol-
low the sun — lures many to
Israel in the spring and
summer. But this does not
do justice to the Israeli
winter which has charms of
its own, and sun is certainly
among them. For where else
can you bask in a warm and
cozy sun in December,
January and February,
looking up into the azure
sky remembering the pour-
ing rain and thundersotrms
of only yesterday?
Jerusalem's winter has
all this and a lot more.
When snow does fall ap-
proximately once every
other year Jerusalemites
never fail to be utterly sur-
prised by the few flakes that
remain for several hours.
Again and again life comes
almost to a standstill in
spite of the municipal
emergency center set up
against snow the moment
the weatherman threatens
it for the area.
Altogether as far as na-
ture is concerned, winter is
the live season of the year.
In the long sunny dry sum-
mer months vegetation goes
into hiding. The first
"chamsin" (hot dry wind
that is frequent in May)
turns all the fresh green in
the open countryside to yel-
low. But let the first "yoreh"
(heavy rain that opens the
rainy season in October)
pour down for two or three
days and the autumn will
soon lay a green carpet over
the dusty, parched land-
scape.

If you are a tourist to
Jerusalem make use of a
sunny winter day to go
out into the cyclamen
country that surrounds
the city, beginning a few
yards beyond the last
house of the built-up
area. There you'll see the
Jerusalem countryside
with its rocks and green-
ery, with thousands of
cyclamens sprouting
everywhere. You'll hear
water running off the
steep slopes, you'll
breathe the fragrant air
of the perennial sturdy
herbs, and you'll look
down to the far away
seashore in the west with
the settlements and
towns that skirt it.

399-9699

Mon.-Fri. 7-7, Sun. 6-5, closed Saturdays

Israel Winter — Greenery Time

By JOSEF GOLDSCHMIDT

Double Standard

lb. pkg.

U.S. No. 1

IDAHO POTATOES

10 lb.

$1 29

L

l

TEHERAN (ZINS) —
Iran's condemnation of
"racialism" has not halted
her economic ties with
South Africa.
Iran exports 50,000 bar-
rels of oil per day to South
Africa, and her exports to
that country totalled $103
million in the last 12
months.
);',1
!t , ?t!.

some of that natural beauty
in the midst of its streets
and buildings, its govern-
ment offices and public in-
stitutions. The unificaiton
of Jerusalem in 1967 gave
the city fathers an enorm-
ous impetus to beautify the
city. Literally thousands of
meters of well-tended
rosebeds run along the arte-
rial roads from the center to
the university campuses of
Mt. Scopus and Givat Ram,
the Knesset and the Israel
Museum.
We inherited the beauti-
ful walls of the Old City
cluttered with ugly shops
and stalls which degraded
that majestic structure.
These businesses have since
moved to the commercial
center of East Jerusalem
and their owners compen-
sated for any losses. Now a
belt of trees, shrubs and
lawn has begun to encom-
pass the city (known as the
National Park), setting off
the dignity of the natural
rock on which the wall is
built and of its hewn
masonry to their advantage
in sunlight by day and in
floodlight by night.
All this planting and
growing has its peak in
an old Jewish festival
that has been revived and
elevated — Tu b'Shevat
— Arbor Day or tree-
planting day. And typi-
cally this is in mid-winter
and not in summer.

The ancient Israelites as
an agricultural people had
very keen insights into the
cycle of the year and its
main events. The Bible al-
ready distinguishes bet-
ween the "former" rains and
the "latter" rains, the
former giving the bulk of
the year's precious liquid.
Tu b'Shevat is considered
the turning point of the sea-
son when milder winds,
lighter and shorter rains
and a more generous sun
begin to prepare the soil and
man for the joys of spring.
On this day, thousands of
schoolchildren plant sapl-
ings to enhance the beauty
of their towns and their
homeland.

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