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December 30, 1977 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-12-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

wocannier au;

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- THE -DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Sinai Helping Denture Wearers

.

(Continued from Page 1)
the operation is a small
longer pins p
d under
e the chin, he
scar
through the jaw and gums
into the mouth and serve —The research that led to
as an anchor for a gold the development of the
dental bridge. New mandibular staple was
dentures are clipped onto begun in 1963, but news of
the bridge instead of the device wasn't
directly onto the gums.
announced to the public
The staple is inserted until 1974.
under anesthesia in a
"We did a clinical study
90-minute operation. Most of the staple on dogs first,"
patients have very little said Dr. John Helfrick,
post-operative pain, Dr. Sinai's chief of oral
Small said. Most require surgery, who aided Dr.
only aspirin for pain. Small in the development
of the device.
"The dog study was
BIG .S.fLECTION!
evaluated by the research
committee at Sinai, which
then gave the go-ahead for
Wedlin(17 PaityHBar Mitzia
a five-year clinical
research study on humans.
About 35 patients were
ALL SIZES
To 44
involved, and at the end of
the five years, each was
154 SOUTB WOODWARD (Nr. Miple) reviewed by all the oral
surgeons at Sinai.
BIRMINGHAM
MI 2 - 4150
"Their report went back
to the research . committee,
which approved the device
as clinically acceptable in

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1974. That's a long time to
sit on your hands when you
know you have something
good, but we wanted to do

it right."
Dr. Small is currently
teaching seminars in
hospitals and dental schools
all over the country to let
other oral surgeons know of
his development.
Though other hospitals
are beginning to adopt the
procedure. Sinai remains a
major center for the
mandibular staple
operation. Dr. Small, who
has performed 110 of the
more than 400 such
operations done throughout
the U.S., has patients as
far away as Texas and
Georgia.
The first national survey
of patients with the staple,
to be published next
summer, will show that
erosion of the jaw is slowed
drastically after the
operation, Dr. Small said.
Bone loss is often so
minimal it can't be
measured.
Dr. Helfrick believes the
mandibular staple will soon
become the accepted
method for treating
mandibular atrophy.
"To me it is now the
accepted method," he said.
"To see these patients
post-operatively, compared
to patients treated the old
way, is amazing. They used
to take bone grafts from
the thigh, or skin grafts
from the hip, and patients
had a great deal of pain
afterwards. Anyone who
has been through that and
now has a staple thinks the
staple is a miracle."

The Organization for Re-
habilitation Through Train-
ing (ORT) operates 700 in-
stallations in 22 countries,
teaching more than 70,000
students annually. More
than a million Jews have
been trained by ORT since
1880.

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Uniqueness of Jewish History Seen
in Kochan's 'Jew and His History'

By ALLEN A. WARSEN

Is the assertion that Dia-
spora Jews have no history,
because they have been
stateless since the destruc-
tion of the Temple in 70 CE,
true? Are they a "fossil
people," as Arnold J.
Toynbee maintained, or a
"pariah people," as Max
Weber claimed?
Lionel Kochan in "The
Jew and His History"
(Schocken Books) rejects
these claims,
As evidence he cites the
Talmud's famous dictum
"each generation has its in-
terpreters and its sages"
and refers to the numerous
works dating from the Sec-
ond Century CE onwards.
It is interesting to note
that some of the authors
Kochan refers to used the
technique "of activating the
past--i.e. of seeing the pre-
sent through the past, of
transposing the past into the
present — to make the past
contain within itself the
promise of future..."
The "method of activating
the past" was employed by
Abraham B. Hiyya (1065-
1143), Abraham Ibn Daud
(1110-1180), and Don Issac
Abrabanel (1437-1508).
In their "messianic-his-
torical" works these schol-
ars predicted on the basis of
past and contemporary
events the coming of the
messiah.
Rabbi B. Hiyya foresaw
that the messianic era
would begin in 1136 CE; Ibn
Daud in 1188 CE; and Abra-
banel in 1503 CE.
Abrabanel, furthermore,
ascertained that he saw the
symptoms "proclaimed in
Talmud, of the 'birth-pangs
of the messiah': the spread
of heresy, the' dissolution of
family ties, physical suffer-
ing, famine, scorn for learn-
ing and scholars."
Abrabanel's teaching
marked the high point of
"classical historic-mes-
sianology" and was com-
pared "to the chiliasm of
the Taborites and Anabapt-
ists of the 15th and 16th
Centuries and the predic-
tions of Savonarola."
Gradually new methods of
recording and interpreting
Jewish history were devel-
oped. Among the first fruits
of the new development
were the works of Isaac
Marcus Jost (1798-1860) and
those of the founders of the
movement known as "die
Wissenschaft des Juden-
turns"—the Science of
Judaism.
l3y Judaism they meant
"the essence of all the cir-
cumstances,- characteristics
and achievements of the
Jews in relation to religion,
philosophy, history, law, lit-
erature in general, civil life
and all affairs of men.'',
The foremost scholar of
"die Wissenschaft des Ju-
dentums" was Leopold Zunz

(1794 1886). He regarded the
Hebrew spiritual heritage
as literature. Similar views
were expressed by other ad-
herents of the science of
Judaism.
They and their views, as
was expected, were de-
nounced by the tradition-
alists.
Samuel David Luzzatto
(1800-1865), a founder of
modern Jewish scholarship
and a forerunner of modern
Zionism, accused them "of
holding Goethe and Schiller
in greater esteem than all
the prophets, Tannaim and
Amoraim."
Samson Raphael Hirsch
(1808-1888) wrote : "...The
tears and sighs of our fa-
thers fill no longe-r our
hearts, but our libraries.
The warmly pulsating
hearts of our fathers has
become our national liter-
atize, their fervent breath
of life has become the dust
of bookshelves...Do these
departed spirits rejoice in
the literary gratitude of our
present generation? Whom
do they recognize as their
true heirs? Those who re-
peated their prayers, but

forgot their names, or those
who forget their prayers but
remember their names?"
Original were the works
of the philosopher-historian,
Nachman Krochmal (1785-
1840), and the historian par
excellence, Heinrich Graetz
(1817-1891). Both believed
that Jewish history "does
not merely show as in the
case of other peoples the
alternation of growth, efflo-
rescence and decay, but
also the extraordinary phe-
nomenon that decay was
again followed by a ne
growth and a new blos

-

Moreover, in the works of
these scholars and in those
of the martyred by the
Nazis, historian Simon Dub-
now (1860-1941), the author
asserts, "themes from the
messianic past remained
dominant, though in guise of
an imminent historical
process.''
"The Jew and His His- -
tory" provides new insights
into the history of Jewish
historiography. It is fully
annotated and contains a
select bibliography and in-
dex.

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