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December 09, 1977 - Image 27

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS Friday, December 9, 1977 27

Anniversary of Allenby Capture of Jerusalem
Marked as His Dramatic Feat is Remembered

JERUSALEM — The im-
mediate associations with
the name Allenby — to Is-
raelis and also to many vis-
itors — have to do with one
of Tel Aviv's main artieries
and shopping streets. Very
few of them will think of
Gen. Sir Edmund Allenby,
who, just 60 years ago, cap-
tured Jerusalem from the
Turks, thus ending 400 years
3f Ottoman rule over the
city.
The conquest of the city
came none too soon for the
city's population, which, at
the beginning of the First
World War, numbered 45,000
Jews, 25,000 Moslems and
10,000 Christians. The num-
bers dwindled, however, as
oppression, economic hard-
ship and even famine forced
many of the city's — and
the country's — residents to
leave the country.
At the outbreak of the

war, most Jews were cut off

MACK PITT

and
His Orchestra

358-3642

from their sources of sup-
port in Germany and Rus-
sia. They were accused and
persecuted by the Turks as
spies for the Allied forces.
Undernourishment' and epi-
demics were rife.
Nor were the Arab resi-
dents of Palestine immune
from persecution. In 1916,
200 of them were accused of
spying for the British and
the French, and condemned
to hanging, exile or life im-
prisonment. The Mufti of
Gaza and his son were
hanged on the basis of
hearsay evidence that they
were spying for the British.
Of the 200,000 Jews in Pa-
lestine at the beginning of
the century, only 70,000 re-
mained at the end of the
war, most of them hungry
and destitute.
Gen. Allenby arrived in
Egypt in June, 1917, after
defeating the Germans at
Arras in France, to take
over command of the Egyp-
tian Expeditionary Force. A
clearer name in this day
and age would be the Brit-
ish Expeditionary Force,
for British Tommies made
up a good part of this army,
together with Australians,
New Zealanders, units from
India and Aden, and a
sprinkling of French and

GOURMET CATERERS

Complete Catering For
All Occasions
576-1822 Milt
851-1539 Larry

A Chug Aliyah

is now being formed
in the Detroit area.

Any person who has decided to make Aliyah or
would like to learn more about life in Isarel is
invited to contact the Israel Aliya Center,

25900 Greenfield Road
Oak Park, Michigan 48237
Telephone: (313) 968-1044

A meeting will take place at 8 p.m.
Sun., Dec. 18 at the 10 Mile branch of the
Jewish Community Center, with movie & refreshments.

.
mz=m2m2
z-

ELECTROLYSIS

WE FOUND THAT OUT 16
R .E.
4"E?!
YEARS AGO. AND WE HAVE
BEEN HELPING PEOPLE RID THEMSELVES OF
UNSIGHTLY HAIR EVER SINCE.

IF YOU HAVE EMBARRASSING HAIR ON
THE FACE, UPPER .LIP, ARMS, LEGS, OR
THIGHS, IT CAN BE REMOVED PERMA-
NENTLY. NOT BY GADGETS, NOT BY
PROMISED MIRACLES, BUT BY MEDICALLY
APPROVED ELECTROLYSIS.

16125 W.12 MILE RD.
OPEN MON. THROUGH FRI. INCLUSIVE

BY APPOINTMENT — 557-8115

/ ///

/V IV

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Clothier

.6474105i

126 S. Woodward, Birmingham

Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat. 10-6,
Thurs. & Fri. 10-9

FOR THE ULTIMATE
IN FASHION-RIGHT
FORMALWEAR RENTALS
• & SALES

Celebrate the occasion with a fresh op-
ach to formalwear. Featuring an exten-
sive selection. The newest styles and colors.

FEATURING
Westwood, Newport, Woodstock,- ';
Windsor, Tux Tails, 21 Colored Shirts,'
Flared Pants, Volare Boots

• WEDDINGS * PROMS • CRUISES
• EVERY IMPORTANT SOCIAL EVENT
-
-

JERUSALEM (JTA)—

?

Mr/ AY/ ///i1/////

In Jerusalem the visitor
could put up at less than a
handful of hotels of doubtful
standards, and most of
them made use of the pil-
grims' hospices. In the
middle '20s, things started
improving with the forma-
tion of the Tourist Associ-
ation, headed by Sir Herbert
Samuel, 'the High Commis-
sioner for Palestine.
The buildings of the new
Hebrew University, opened
in 1925 on Mt. Scopus,
events of international stat-
ure such as the Tel Aviv
trade fairs, and the appear-
ance of Jewish kibutzim and
other settlements, that
transformed the appearance
of the land, all contributed
to putting the traditional
tourism based on pilgri-
mages on a broader basis.
But tourism still had a long
way to go to reach the num-
ber of one million visitors a
year, 60 years after Allenby
entered Jerusalem.

Johnny Cash
Visits Israel

WORKS!

/

Italians.
His task was to repulse
the Turks who were, at that
point, in control of all the
Holy Land down to the
Sinai. His first major objec-
tive was Jerusalem.
Allenby's men captured
Beersheba, Gaza and Jaffa
in the scorching heat of
summer, compounded by a
chronic dearth of water for
men and beast (the force
had thousands of donkeys,
camels and horses as pack
animals). By the time they
went up in the hills towards
Jerusalem, winter has set in
and the men had to endure
torrential rains and seas of
mud.
On Dec. 9, 1917, the mayor
of Jerusalem surrendered,
and on the 11th Allenby
made his entry into the city
through Jaffa Gate — on
foot. His explanation of this
gesture: "How could it be
otherwise, where One had
walked before?"
He also must have had in
mind a previous visitor, if
not conqueror, to the city —
Kaiser Wilhelm II of Ger-
many, who 19 years earlier
had ordered a section of the
ancient city walls removed
so he and his entourage
could make his entrance on
horses and in carriages.
The population of Jerusa-
lem acclaimed Allenby as
their liberator. Not only did
he deliver them from the
Turkish yoke, his troops
brought with them food for
which there was a dire
need. It soon became clear
that for the Jews, the Brit-
ish Mandatory government
was far from being a benign
ruler. Still, steps were taken
to transform Jerusalem
from the neglected poverty-
stricken provincial town of
Turkish times to a capital
city.
A trip to the Holy Land in
those days was a hazardous
undertaking. One could ei-
ther travel by steamer to
Egypt and then follow Al-
lenby's route, albeit without
having to fight the Turks,
but still no joyride. The al-
ternative was to find a ship
headed for Jaffa and land-
ing in the fishing port by
lighter.

/IA

Johnny Cash, the famous
American country and
Western singer, recently
visited the Hadassah-He-
brew University Medical
Center here twice in two
days.
"I was so impressed when
I first came to see the fa-
mous stained glass windows
by Marc Chagall, that I
couldn't forget the place
and had to return to visit
with soldiers in the wards, -
he said.
In Israel to make a CBS-
TV film, Cash said, "This is
my fourth visit to Israel. I
just hope that some day
there will be peace."

"Budget" a mathematical
confirmation of your
suspicions. —A. A. Latimer

Hospitality is getting old friends together for a social game.

Everyone laughs, talks, reminisces. Helping things along
are your good food and rich, mellow Maxwell House Coffee.
Cup after cup, Maxwell House is always robust and
cheering. So put in a supply of Instant o'r Regular Maxwell House
Coffee and roll out the red carpet.

"Good To The Last Drop"®

K

CERTIFIED
KOSHER

94NCItad. MOOS

A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century



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