100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 09, 1977 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS Friday, December 9, 1977 13

Kashrut Controversy in Old Detroit

By IRVING I. KATZ
Although Temple Beth El
is today one of the largest
Reform Jewish congrega-
tions in the country, it was
organized in 1850 as an
Orthodox congregation, and
the tenets of traditional
Judaism, including kashrut,
were observed by the mem-
bers until 1861, when Beth
El became Reform.
One of the duties of the
alirst two rabbis of Beth El
s to act as shohet for the
small Jewish community. In
1859, Rabbi Liebman Adler,
then the spiritual leader of
Beth El, inserted a "Reli-
gious Notice," in Hebrew, in
the Occident, a monthly
periodical published by
Rabbi Isaac Leeser of
Philadelphia, who was the
acknowledged leader of tra-
ditional Judaism in the
United States at that time.
The following is a trans-
lation of Rabbi Adler's
notice:
NOTICE TO TRAVELERS
OF OUR BRETHREN
WHO OBSERVE KASHRUT
A local Jew for some time
kept his store open on the
Sabbath in addition to week
days. When he saw that the
desecration of the Sabbath
did not bring him greater
success, he decided to
become a shohet and sold
his meat to the Jewish
people.
This man, however, did
not receive certification

Incredible!

Great coffee
in your office
for only
pennies a cup.

Our Office Coffee Service sup-
plies an incredibly good cup
of coffee at a very low cost.
Delicious Maxwell House" or
Yuban - Coffee. All you buy
are kits including coffee, fil-
ters, sugar and creamer. We
provide the equipment and
maintenance at no extra
charge. Call now. Have a
good cup of coffee tomorrow!

AM

'''•

;;

custom coffact
SERVICE

914 W. 9 Mile Rd.
399-8444

from any authorized person
in this country. Further-
more, it is doubtful that he
can even read and under-
stand Hebrew. He claims
that he received author-
ization in his native country
which he left some four or
five years ago. But accord-
ing to his own admission
and those of his acquaint-
ances, he was never a prac-
ticing shohet.
I have tried to persuade
him in a nice way to desist
from acting as a shohet and
I warned him that I am
duty-bound to expose him
put-ilk:1y but he refused to
listen to me. With the con-
sent of the leaders of our
congregation, I was forced
to announce from the pulpit
of our synagogue that his
meat was treif.
Now, this man went to

BY BEN GALLOB

(Copyright 1977, JTA, Inc.)

A Jewish university,
started in a few classrooms
30 years ago in Los Angeles,
is now a full-fledged aca-
demic institution, with both
undergraduate and gradu-
ate schools and a policy of
making its facilities avail-
able throughout the year to
groups that need such facil-
ities.
The University of
Judaism, started in re-
sponse to a suggestion by
Dr. Mordecai Kaplan that
the Jewish Theological Sem-
inary, the Conservative in-
stitution in New York, set
up a west-coast branch, of-
fered its first classes in
1947. It now has some 3,000
students.
At the present time, on its
$3.5 million new campus,
the university maintains
five academic programs.
One, the University College
of Jewish Studies, has a full
range of undergraduate
courses in Hebrew, Jewish
history, Bible, literature
and related subjects.
Two graduate schools—
the graduate school and the
graduate school of Ju-
daica—serve a growing
number of students who
wish to enter the rabbinate,
to work in Jewish educa-
tion, to work as adminis-
trators or in other profes-
sional capacaites in the
Jewish community, or who
simply want to add a Jewish
component to their regular
studies in other institutions.
The adult college, de-
scribed as a ' unique pro-
gram, enables adults to
earn degrees in Judaic stud-

of

Vel/t

aCnocsI lLett ilics Boutique
17117 W. 9 MILE, NORTH PARK PLAZA BLDG. Southfield
Suite 111
559-2930
NEXT TO SHERATON-SOUTHFIELD HOTEL
Wish Everyone A

"

The Gold Place announces a fabulous sale on a fine collection of genuine
_antique and estate jewelry. One of a kind pieces and valuable
heirlooms are featured at exceptionally low prices. Don't miss this
chance to own rare and priceless jewels. These are just a small sample
from the vast selection on hand at the Gold Place. Hurry, for
extraordinary values you won't want to miss.

ONE OE A KIND PIECES

Dating as far back as 1775 —

The University of Judaism
Flourishes on the West Coast

....„,
Sandy Knapp & Marlene Cassidy

Sva
a

Cincinnati and took along
with him glowing testi-
monials from those who like
his meat, asking Rabbi Wise
(leader of Reform Judaism)
to welcome him with open
arms.
Upon his return to
Detroit, I was told that he
received certification to
serve as a shohet but I have
no idea who gave him the
authorization. This man is
again acting as a shohet and
is misleading those who
observe kashrut.
Therefore, I call upon all
travelers who are observant
of the commandments of
our Torah not to partake
food in a Jewish home
unless they make sure the
source of the meat.
Issued By The Holy Con-
gregation of Detroit, 5619.
Liebman Adler Ha'Kohen

HAPPY HANUKA

ies while attending classes
on a part-time basis. The
university provides a wide
range of adult education
classes both at the univer-
sity and at cooperating
synagogues.
The university supervises
a College of Jewish Studies
in San Francisco. It also
conducts annually a scholar-
in-residence program which
sends faculty members to
two dozen communities on
weekend programs. It also
presents an annual lecture
series through which inter-
nationally known persons in
Jewish life come to Los An-
geles and other area cities
to lecture and lead evenings
of discussion.
The university presents
an annual TV series on the
local CBS station and its
center for contemporary
Jewish life sponsors re-
search programs in areas of
Jewish concern. There are
also two university-spon-
sored summer institutes.
The university maintains
one of the major Jewish
libraries on the west coast
and, with it, a documenta-
tion center housing more
than half a million clip-
pings, brochures, pamphlets
and other sources of infor-
mation on the recent history
and current status of the
Jewish people.

Hanuka Ceremony
at White House

WASHINGTON—A men-
ora lit by a torch from
Israel was kindled in a spe-
cial White House Hanuka
ceremony on Wednesday.
The torch was brought by
Masada, the youth move-
ment of the Zionist Organi-
zation of America, and Rab-
bi Joseph P. Sternstein,
president of the ZOA, said
the blessings and lit the
menora for President Car-
ter.
The torch was lit from a
special shrine at Modi'in.
near Jerusalem, home of
the Maccabees, and was
flown to the U.S. this week.

14K yellow gold stick
pin. Ruby and 5 rose-cut
diamonds. Circa 1775.
Valued at $125.00.

30% OFF

14K yellow gold pin.
Sunburst, pearls and 35
pt. diamond. Circa 1910.
Valued at $470.00.

$87.50

30% OFF

$329.50

Platinum ring. Sapphire
and 55 diamonds, 63
pts. Circa 1910. Valued
at $3, 000.00

30% OFF

engraved
filled
Gold
bangle bracelet. Circa
1860. Valued at $65.00.

30% OFF

$45.50

$2,100

14K yellow gold pin. Dia-
mond with hair locket.
Circa 1860. Valued at
$150.00.

30% OFF

$105.00

18K yellow gold brace-
let. 3 diamonds, 1.60 ct.
Circa 1865. Valued at
$1,50

OF
OFF F

18K yellow' gold ornate
bib
necklace.
Circa
1920. Valued at $750.00.

$1,050

30% OFF

$525.00

18K yellow gold long
earrings. Circa 1925.
Valued at $350.00.

30% OFF

Gold filled enamel
Waldemere watch chain.
Circa 1885. Valued at
$50.00.

30% OFF

Gold filled Elgin hunting
case watch. Circa 1886.
Valued at $250.00

30% OFF

$35.00

Gold filled hair chain.
With simulated pearls
and rubies. Circa 1878.
Valued at $85.00.

30% OFF

$175.00

Gold filled Hamilton rail-
road open face watch.
Circa 1894. Valued at
$235.00.

Gold filled slide. for
30% OFF
chain. Enamel and
cameo. Circa 1865.
Valued at $95.00.
$66.50
30% OFF

$164.50

The Gold Place Policy:
Never a Due Bill ... Always
a Cash Refund

Open
Monday-Saturday
9:30-5:00.

North Park Plaza, Room 120
17117 W. Nine Mile Road
Southfield, Michigan 48075
- (313) 559-6140

$245.00

$59.56

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan