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November 04, 1977 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.





20 Friday, November 4, 1977 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Yeshiva University Names Five to New Positions

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rypewriters Selectric etc.

6

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342.7800 399-8333 342-1221)

.

NEW YORK—Dr. Nor-
man Lamm, president of
Yeshiva University, last
week marked the start of
his second year in office by
launching a major aca-

demic restructuring pro-
gram including the appoint-
ment of five new key
administrators and the
charting of university objec-
tives in a reaffirmation of

good times, good food, good friends
come enjoy life with us at . • •

KLIN
CLUdIAPARTMEIJTS

an adult community
28301 Franklin Road, Southfield, Michigan

Now accepting reservations

please call Mrs. Neville at 353-2810 to
obtain information or arrange an interview.
from $535 per month

the institution's quality
education commitment.
The five new adminis-
trators include Dr. Blanche
D. Blank, the first woman in
the university's 92-year his-
tory to serve as academic
vice president; Dr. Karen
Bacon, a 33-year-old micro-
biologist, as dean of Stem
College for Women; Dr.
Morton Berger, N.Y. State
Education Department offi-
cial as dean of Ferkauf
Graduate School and Uni-
versity-wide behavioral sci-
ence dean; and Dr. Daniel
C. Kurtzer, 28-year-old U.S.
State Department officer as
the new dean of Yeshiva
College, the youngest
administrator of the college
in its 50-year history.
Dean Jacob M. Rabinow-
itz, dean of undergraduate
Jewish studies and Jewish
education at the university's
Erna Michael College of
Hebraic Studies, was named
to a new Jewish studies
post.

WE THE UNDERSIGNED BELIEVE THAT

MAYOR Donald F.

FRACASSI

SHOULD BE RE-ELECTED TO ANOTHER TERM OF OFFICE

AS MAYOR OF SOUTHFIELD

WE URGE YOUR SUPPORT FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONS:

He is highly experienced in South-
field Civic affairs.
(a) City councilman for 6 1/2 years
(b) Council president for 2 1/2 years
(c) Mayor for 5 years
2.. He is easily accessible; has a
listed phone number and is avail-
able at his home, his business,
and the Mayor's office to anyone
who needs or desires his atten-
tion.
3. He has always maintained a high
level of interest in the needs of the
people of our community.
4. He is willing to stand up for what
he believes and be counted even
when such a decision may be
unpopular with the Council.
5. He is the Mayor who fought
against and from the beginning

vetoed the recent Council action
on low income housing.

6. He has aided the homeowner and
the numerous subdivisions in our
city on their fight against en-
croaching high rise devel-
opments.

7. He has successfully fought for
better schools and better fire and
police protection.

8. He has been a Southfield resident
for 30 years.

9. As a Southfield businessman for
20 years, he knows and under-
stands your problems.

10. He has credibility, and always
maintained the dignity of his of-
fice.

SOUTHFIELD MUST HAVE AND CANNOT AFFORD LESS THAN THE MOST
EXPERIENCED...THE MOST KNOWLEDGEABLE...THE MOST CAPABLE...ONE
WITH PROVEN ABILITY.
We Therefore Ask That You Support MAYOR DONALD FRACASSI

And Cast Your Vote For Him, Nov. 8, 1977, When You Go To The Polls.

AL SOUFRINE
ALAN ROSENBERG

THIS AD PAID FOR BY

MAYNORD M. FELDMAN
WILLIAM FENKELL

Delegation Gives Description
of Jewish Life in Bulgaria

By MOSHE RON

The Jewish News
Special Israel Correspondent

TEL AVIV — Recently an
official delegation'from Bul-
garia came to Israel to cele-
brate there, with Israelis of
Bulgarian origin, the 33rd
anniversary of Bulgaria's
independence. The delega-
tion consisted of Zioko Stai-
nov, secretary of the
National Council of the
National Front, and Crista
Dassevski, vice secretary
for foreign cultural rela-
tions. They were invited to
Israel by the Association for
Israeli-Bulgarian Friend-
shi 11.
The celebrations took
place in the Tel Aviv suburb
of Bat Yam. The Israeli
speakers were Dr. Nissim_
Levy, attorney Nvraham
Melamed and the artist
Minca Manda. All three
expressed gratitude to the
Bulgarian government for
saving Jewish lives during
the Holocaust.
The Bulgarian speakers
declared that the Jews of
Bulgaria today enjoy com-
plete and equal rights, with
Jews holding important
positions in Bulgarian art
and cultural life. They
said that although diplo-
matic relations between
Bulgaria and Israel were
severed 10 years ago after
the Six-Day War, the fact
that they had arrived as an
official delegation showed
the desire of their govern-
ment to improve relations.

During their visit to Yad
Vashem in Jerusalem, the
visitors stressed with pride
that the Bulgarian people
did not allow the Nazis to
deport Jews to their deaths,
and they disagreed with the
Yad Vashem claim that
7,000 Bulgarian Jews per-
ished in the Holocaust.
The Bulgarian spokesmen
described the Jewish com-
munity there as numbering
5,000, with no anti-Semitism
at all. The president of the
Jewish community, Prof.
Salvador Israel, is a scien-
tist and a member of . the
science academy, they said.
Although the Jewish com-
munity has a cantor, shohet
and usher, they explained, -
there are no rabbis or
mohelim; two Jewish sur-
geons in the Bulgarian capi-
tal of Sofia perform circum-

delegates
cisions.
The
estimated that inter-
marriage was more than 50
percent, leaving a surplus of
single Jewish women.
Bulgarians
also
The
claimed that a few dozen
Jews pray in the Sofia syna-
gogue on Sabbaths and holi-
days. They said there is a
second synagogue in Plawo; -
diew. Even though the Bul,
garian government supports
the pro-Arab policies of the
Soviet Union, the delegates
said, relations between the
government and the Jewish
community are good, with
no pressure at all upon the
Jews to sign anti-Israel
declarations.
They also reported that
the Bulgarian Jewish com-
munity is interested in
establishing relations with
the World Jewish Congress.
The delegates said that last
year Jewish tourism to Bul-
garia opened up, and the
Jewish community intends
to open a kosher restaurant
in Sofia to encourage fur-
ther Jewish tourism. Other
kosher restaurants will be
opened at one of the Black
Sea resorts, which is visited
by Israelis they said. They
also claimed that Israelis
have no difficulty obtaining
visas at Sofia airport.
The Bulgarian govern-
ment also supports, the
delegates said, the monthly
magazine of the Jewish
community, called Jew-
reisky Narodny Klub.
Meanwhile, Knesset Sec-
retary Nathaniel Lorch, who
accompanied the Israeli
delegates to the Congress of
the International Parka-
mentry Union held in Sep-
tember in Sofia, gave his
account of Jewish life in
Bulgaria. Erev • Rosh Hash-
ana, Lorch said, they visited
the Sofia synagogue. He
said they found about 50
elderly men there, many of
whom did not own taleisim;
a few aged women were in
the women's section. The
800-seat synagogue, Lorch
said, showed obvious signs
of neglect, with broken
seas and dirty walls. The
cantor led services in bro-
ken Hebrew and Ladino.
Although the visitors to the
synagogue included Jews
from many different coun-
tries, the synagogue merri
bers hardly spoke to them
at all, Lorch said.

Hasidic Leader's Grave Restored

ELIZABETH, N.J.,
(JTA)—Rabbi Pinchas M.
Teitz reported that he
received a phone call from
Kiev, informing him that a
monument on the grave of
the Baal Shem, foundei of
the Hasidic movement, has
been restored with a brief
and simple inscription on it:
"Here rests the Baal Shem
Tov, Z'tzl." Rabbi Yisroel
Baal Shem Toy ,died on the
first day of Shavuot in 1760.
This, Teitz said, culmi-
nates three years of activity
since his visit to the Soviet
Union in 1974, when he

received special permission
from the Ukrainian author-
ities to visit the city of Med-
zibuz, 200 kilometers from
Kiev. There are now three
Jews remaining in the city
which once was the center
of Hasidic life in all of Rus-
sia, Teitz reported.

Eliyahu Lapitsky and his
son, Hillia, both Soviet engi-
neers, were engaged to
restore the burial site which
had deteriorated due to
neglect. Lapitsky phoned
Teitz to inform him of the
completion of his work.

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