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May 27, 1977 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

22 Friday, May 27, 1977

Talit Fringes Are Reminders of the Bible

BY RABBI SAMUEL FOX

(Copyright 1977, JTA, Inc.)

The tsitsit (fringe) at-
tached to the four corners of
the talit are significant be-
cause the Bible says that

these fringes are to be
looked upon so that one will
remember "all the corn-

REMEMBER

THE BLUE BOX
AND EVERYTHINGelT

STANDS FOR ON EVERY
IMPORTANT OCCASION.

968.0820

m-andments of the Almighty
and do them" (Numbers
15:39).
It has been suggested that

the word "tsitsit" comes

from the root "to peer" or
"to look." This would indi-
cate that the fringe give
man a perspective from
which to look out into the
world. It enables man to get
a clear perception through
the clouds of confusion that
sometimes distort his out-
look on life.
The fact that the fringes
are equally distributed on

the four corners of the talit

seems to imply that by their
means man can gain a bal-
anced vision instead of a
prejudiced outlook on the
world.
The blue fringe origi-

PHILIP TEWEL

661-4050
661-1000

JEWEL KOSHER CATERERS

will match your non kosher catered
event with a comparable kosher event.

Due to cancellation June 19th is available

MAIN OFFICE:
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER

6600 W EST MAPLE RD.
WEST BLOOM FIELD, MICH.
48033

Under Supervision of the Vaad Harabonim

EXHIBITION
AND SALE

of paintings of Freighters,.
Lighthouses & Landscapes by

DOUGLAS HOOK

Preview Saturday May 28---10-5 p.m.
Sunday May 29---2-5 p.m.
Exhibition & Sale continues
through June 11, 1977.

THE WAYNE ART GALLERY

71 Riverside Dr. E Windsor, Ont. N9A 2S4
1-519-232-222a

nally included among the
rest (but which is not now
included because of the
doubt as to the exact shade
of blue originally re-
quired) was said to be
symbolic of the blue color
of the heaven which was
considered the vault of the
Almighty. In this respect,
the Jew wrapped in his
talit feels himself to be
wrapped up in the splen-
dor of the Almighty.
The blue fringe is bal-
anced by white, the symbol
of purity.
Since the blue thread is
no longer used a stripe of
black or blue runs across the
talit to remind us of the
original thread of blue re-
quired for the fringe. Some
insist on black either be-
cause the blue stripe might
lead one to believe that this
was the original shade of
blue or because the black is
a symbol of mourning for
the destroyed Temple (the
reason for our ignorance of
the exact shade of blue).
Some claim that the mix-
ture of black or blue with
the white cloth indicates
.,hat no man is completely
pure and innocent, ie., com-
pletely white.

IDB Bank Report's

Increase in Assets

NEW YORK — Israel
Discount Bank Ltd., the
principal subsidiary of
IDB Bankholding Corp.
Ltd., reported increases
in consolidated net
operating income and
consolidated assets for
the year ended Dec. 31,
1976.
In terms of U. S. dollars,
this year's consolidated
results represented an
increase of 20 percent in
assets; 15 percent in net
operating income; and 14
percent in capital ac-
counts. These increases
were achieved despite the
23 percent devaluation of
the Israel pound during
the year.

INCREDIBLE! 10U KEPT

MR. and MRS. GROUP #282
CITY OF HOPE

says

THAINIKS t°

the hundreds of donors for their fine gifts
and toover 3000 people who made out 11th
Annual Night of Games the biggest and
best, breaking all previous records.

°

All proceeds from this
great event goes to the

CITY OF HOPE HOSPITAL

catastrophic diseases

the World renowned research center, Duarte, Calif.
7410%4 "09ezza 7tempt 7l e 1 4 e6,,eft ee,
,4act Amaceiate Vaagerd
,roceft
tite 7122, aad

Freiheit Hits Communist Attack

NEW YORK—The editors
of the left-wing Yiddish
daily Morning Freiheit
have responded to recent at-
tacks by the American Com-
munist Party and told the
party to "heal thyself."
Editor Paul Novick, 85,
told a public rally last week
that the hatred of Israel
within the Communist,
Party was so profound that
it borders on anti-Semitism.

The Communist organ,
Daily World, printed a
2,000-word attack on the
Morning Freiheit on May
11.. The Freiheit re-printed
the attack in its Sunday
issue and challenged the
Daily World to print its
reply.
Writer Sid Resnick said
the Freiheit made inquiries
after prominent Jewish
writers disappeared in Rus-

sia in 1950 and was told by
the American Communist
Party that it had fallen vic-
tim to the ravings of bour-
geoisie.
Novick challenged the
American Communist
Party to have self-appraisal
sessions "to find out why
you are so isolated in this
country, while the Commun-
ist parties of Italy, France
and Spain are so strong."

Paul Zuckerman,World-Renowned
Philanthopist,Marks 65th Birthday

The 65th birthday cele-
bration for Paul Zuckerman
irofficially on Tuesday, but
tributes from througho- :t
the United States and Israel
have already begun to pour
in.

Zuckerman, president of
the United Jewish Appeal,
will host his own birthday
party in Israel July 8, fly-
ing his children and grand-
children to his home in Cae-
sarea for the affair.
Zuckerman is chairman
of the world fund-raising
committee of the Jewish
Agency, and a director of
the United Foundation of
Detroit, the Detroit Round
Table of the National Con-
ference of Christians and
Jews, United Israel Appeal,
American Joint Distribution
Committee, Michigan So-
ciety for Mentally Dis-
eased, and the Detroit In-
stitute of Arts.

He is also -a member of
the advisory board of the
Wayne State University
Press, the Detroit Service
Group, the executive corn-

PAUL ZUCKERMAN

mittees of Sinai Hospital of
Detroit and the American-
Israel Public Affairs Corn-
mittee, the Hundred Club of
Detroit, Bnai Brith, the
boards of governors of Ben-
Gurion University and the
Jewish Agency, life mem-
berships with the Shriner's
Hospital for Crippled Chil-
dren, Brandeis —University
Association and the Jewish
Chautauqua Society.

He is a 32nd degree
Mason and Shriner, is a di-
rector of Franklin Hills
Country Club, member of
the Standard City Club, and
a vice president of Ameri-
can ORT.
Zuckerman has held offi-
cer positions with the U.S.
Food for Peace Committee
under President Johnson,
the United Jewish Charities
of Detroit, the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation, the Allied
Jewish Campaign and the
Israel Emergency Fund
and has served on the
boards of the Fresh Air So-
ciety and the Cranbrook
School Dad's Club.
He is a founder of the
Maryglade College of Catho-
lit Missionaries.
Zuckerman was cited
with the Fred M. Butzel Me-
morial Award in 1969 for
distinguished communal
service and has been the
Detroit Chamber of Com-
merce food industry man of
the year.
He has been awarded hon-
orary doctorate degrees
from Bar-Ilan University
and Sienna Heights College.

`History -A Novel' Is Long, Drawn Out

By ALAN HITSKY
The "naturalism" style of
writing of the 1920s and 30s
proves more detrimental
than helpful to Elsa Mo-
rante's "History - -A Novelu
(Knopf ).
The author's description
of every breath and move-
ment of the central family
members and pets in war-
torn Rome certainly contrib-
uted to the book's excessive
length (555 pages) and read-
ing time, but rarely added
to the theme of a half-Jew-
ish woman, raped by a
young German soldier, who
struggles through the war
trying to keep herself and
the "offspring of her
shame" alive.
Ida Mancuso, Morante's
central character, is a delib-
erately weak creation, but
her fears that officials will
discover her half-Jewish ge-
nealogy play a minor role
in the story. Morante in-
jects the "history" at the
beginning of each major
chapter in her book, high-
lighting the events of the
world while Ida, her baby
Useppe, his boisterous half-
brother Nino and assorted
family pets struggle to re-
main alive.
Only Ida really struggles.

The eats, the dogs, the wild

Nino get .along rather well,
even at a time when cats
and dogs were welcome ad-
ditions to the sparse fare of
the poor who are huddled to-
gether in a barn-like struc-
ture after being bombed out
of their apartments.
Useppe, though, does
even better, seemingly
oblivious to all deprivation
as a god-like child with oc-
casional super-natural
powers. He survives quite
well as a new-born, despite
being left alone all day in
his crib.
The author injects a Jew-
ish theme briefly: the eerie
quiet of the deserted rail-
road station as passers-by
shun the no-man's-land
around the box cars of

Jews about' to begin their
final journey; the official
Nazi decrees on race; a
glimpse of the Jewish
ghetto and Ida figuring
Useppe's points under the
Nazi system to see if he
would be spared if her un-
fortunate genealogy were
discovered.

This theme, however, is
incidental to the author's
lengthy tragedy. The weak
Ida, the surreal Useppe and
the wild, kill-to-live Nino
fight their individual
struggles for life up to the
tragic end.
Unfortunately, "History -
A Novel" is too drawn out
and cluttered with unimpor-
tant details to be effective.

UJA Event Marks Jerusalem Unity

NEW YORK (JTA)—Je-
rusalem Mayor Teddy Kol-
lek will join with the lead-
ership of the American Jew-
ish community at a United
Jewish Appeal Reunion
Wednesday celebrating the
10th anniversary of Jerusa-
lem's unity and the national
closing of the 1977 cam-
paign, UJA general chair-
man Frank R. Lautenberg
announced.

culmination of a fund-rais-
ing effort that began last
January with a purpose of
broadening the campaign
base by involving an in-
creasing number_of Ameri-
can Jews in the work of the
UJA.

Most recently, an esti-
mated 243,000 walkers in
133 communities across the
country raised more than $2
million in the first UJA Na-
The luncheon marks the tional Walk-a-Thon. May 15.

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