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March 25, 1977 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

8 Friday. March 25. 1977

MOVING?



HOUSEHOLD
SALES
• •
IN
YOUR HOME








ESTATES

LIQUIDATED

IRENE EAGLE

626-4769 626-8907'



Jeanette Mager, wife of
Mikhail Mager, electronics
engineer in the Ukraine
who has been denied per-
mission to immigrate. to Is-
rael, and is now on a hun-
ger strike, is in Detroit as a
guest of the Jewish Commu-
nity Council of Detroit and
Cong. Shaarey Zedek.
Mrs. Mager will speak
Saturday morning, during
services, at Shaarey Zedek.

Maot Hitim, the age-old
custom of distributing
Pesah necessities to the
poor, literally means wheat
money, that is, funds for
the purchase of matzot.

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Congressmen Lash Soviet Campaign Against Jews

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Police watched as demonstrators sat in at the New York
office of the Russian trade agency, Amtorg. The demon-
stration protested the Russian ban on importation of mat-
zot from abroad. Rabbi Alexander Safran, chief rabbi of
Geneva, has asked the International Red Cross and the
Ecumenical Council to intercede with the Russians. Rep.
James Blanchard (D-Mich.) has asked President Carter to
persuade the USSR to withdraw the ban.

Soviet Human Rights Parley
to Be Held at U-M Next Week

AKTSIA/Action for Soviet
Jewry and Human Rights,
a student-run organization
whose purpose is to inspire
interest in the plight of So-
viet ' Jews and dissidents,
will coodinate a symposium
on human rights in the
USSR, Monday to Wednes-
day at the University of

HARRY I. LAKER TESTIMONIAL DINNER

in appreciation of
his service as
President (1974-76)

tendered by
Cong.
Beth Achim

Thursday, April 21 (Yom Ha ' atzmaut) 6:30 P.M.

in Beth Achim's Wasserman Hall, 21100 West 12 Mile Road

with
prominent
personalities

Judaism Parley
at U of Chicago

Sen. Donald Riegle

Lou Gordon

Dinner Arrangements Committee, William Freedman, Chairman

Mr. and Mrs. Sheltton Jacobs
Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Laker
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Laker
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Laker

Rabbi and Mrs. Milton Arm
-Mr. and Mrs. Elliot Burns
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Fox
Judge and Mrs. Benjamin Friedman

For Reservations Call the
Beth Achim Office at 352-8670

.....

.

.

.

.....

Michigan in Ann Arbor.
Speakers will be Mikhail
Agursky, former Soviet dis-
sident and now senior lec-
turer at the Soviet and East
European Center at Hebrew
University; Andrew Eh-
renkreutz, U-M professor of
Islamic history and chair-
man of the executive coun-
cil of the North- American
Studies Center for Polish Af-
fairs; Vladimir Fnunkin, re-
cent immigrant to the U.S.
and now at Oberlin College
doing a dissertation on un-
derground music in the
USSR.
Also speaking will be Vic-
tor Herman, who spent 18
years as a political prisoner
in the. USSR; Vladimir Kov-
lovsky, who immigrated to
the U.S. after serving as
spokesman and interpreter
for Moscow dissidents; Lev
Lifshitz, recent Russian
emigre, and teaching assist-
ant at U-M; Herbert Paper,
professor in the Depart-
ment of Linguistics at U-M.
The symposium is co-
sponsored by Bnai Brith Hill-
el, U-M Center for Russian
and East European Studies,
Workmen's Circle, - Detroit
Committee for Soviet
Jewry and the Office of
Ethics and Religion at U-M.
For information, call U-M
Bnai Brith Hillel, (313)663-
3336.

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Lasher
Mrs. Lofty Partovich
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tunick
Mrs. Fredell Whiteman

CHICAGO — The Di-
vinity School of The Uni-
versity of Chicago will
hold a conference on "The
Jewish Religious Tradi-
tion" April 17-20, co-
sponsored with the Union
of American Hebrew
Congregations. "Worship
and Transcendence" will
be the theme of the con-
ference. Professor
Jonathan Z. Smith, the
program . chairman, said
speakers will include
"representatives from
every major center of
Jewish learning in ,the

(Continued from Page 1)
fr
The international tribunal
on the •impsonment of Dr.
Shtern was scheduled to
meet Thursday in Amster-
dam, despite the release of
Shtern.
Andrei Sakharov, the
Nobel Laureate in physics,
charged last week that by
detaining Anatoly Sha-
ransky, the "Kremlin is at-
tempting to blackmail the
West before (Secretary of
State Cyrus) Vance's visit.".
Vance is scheduled to meet
with Soviet officials in Mos-
cow next week.
Representatives of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations were scheduled
to meet with Vance on
Thursday.
Rabbi Alexander Schind-
ler, chairman of the confer-
ence, said Vance would re-
ceive a list of Jewish activ-
ists and be asked to inter-
vene of their behalf.
Sakharov also reported
that both . Jewish activists
and non-Jewish dissidents
gathered today in Moscow
to protest the detention of
Sharansky, the leading
press spokesman of the So-
viet Jewish activists and a
member of the unofficial
Helsinki watchdog commis-
si )n, in Moscow set up to
monitor Soviet compliance
wig the humanitarian provi-
sio' is of the Helsinki ac-
co .ds signed in 1975.
Sharansky's wife Na-
talya, attended the-meeting
of the NCSJ Sunday, to
rally support for her hus-
band. She and the wives of
several other dissidents at-
tempted to enter the Soviet
Mission in New York to de-
liver a petition.

Meanwhile, the NCSJ
said the apartment of So-
viet Jewish activist Vladi-
mir Slepak was taken over
by a group of thugs who
made a shambles of the
apartment,- destroying
many of the family's pos-
sions. No police- intervened.
Slepak, who has been
waiting for an exit visa
since 1970, was recently ac-
cused, along with Sha-
ransky, of being a contact
for the CIA. At the same
time, it was learned that a
group of 50 Soviet-Pentacos-
tals issued an appeal to
Christians around the world
to aid the struggle of Soviet
Jews.

NCSJ chairman Gold told
the U.S. Joint Commission
on Security and Coopera-
tion in Europe, meeting in
Washington last week, that
"at present time" 180,000 in-
vitations sent to Soviet
Jews to find their -homes in
Israel have not been acted
upon.
He said, "Before we can
consider change in the So-
viet trade. relationship," it
is "necessary" to have
"some affirmative acts in
respect to Soviet Jews as a
precondition for a differing
attitude by either Congress
or the American people."
He pointed out that last
year 55,000 affidavits were
sent to the -Soviet Union at
the request of Soviet Jews
and of these 26,000 were a
renewal of, affidavits that

had become outdated
bcause the recipients appar-
ently were not permitted to
leave. Gold said that the
number of "hard core" re-
fusniks is about 900 families
totaling approximately 2,000
persons.
Gold and other witnesses
testified to the harassment
and-other practices in the
Soviet Union used against
Jews who sought visas
emigrate to Israel. The rat
of affidavits at present is ell.
timated at 5,000 each month.
Since 1970, about 133,000
Jews have emigrated from
the Soviet Union. About
14,000 last year, NCSJ
sources said.

Most of the Jews who left
the Soviet -Union in Febru-
ary with Israeli visas but
"dropped out" in Vienna
came from the large cities
of European Russia, the
Jewish Agency's • immigra-
tion department disclosed
in its monthly report.
All of the dropouts were
under 40 years of age and
most were university gradu-
ates, mainly with engineer-
ing degrees. According to
the report, 523 of more than
1,000 Soviet Jews ostensibly
bound for Israel last month,
remained in Vienna to seek
visas for other countries--a
dropout rate of 49 percent.
Most of them -came from
Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev
and Odessa.
Meanwhile, human rights
specialists and experts on
religious communities in
Eastern Europe, in a public
tribunal in New York, testi-
fied that the Soviet Union
knowingly and deliberately
violated the Helsinki ac-
cord, which it signed in Au-
gust, 1975, by denying basic
human rights to both Chris-
tians and Jews.
The public hearing was
held at the Carnegie Center
for International Peace
under the auspices of the
National Interreligious
Task Force on Soviet
Jewry. which, at the
request of the Helsinki com-
mission of the Senate and
the House, is organizing the
testimony to be given be-
fore the commission in
Washington- on April 28,
The joint congressional
commission is preparing
for U.S. participation in a
meeting in Belgrade, Yugo-
slavia, in June, at which
the 35 nations that signed
the Helsinki agreement will
consider the possibility of
establishing a permanent or-
ganization..._

At the annual meeting of
HIAS- in New York on Sun-
day, HIAS president Carl
Glick said, "With the dan-
ger to Jews in the USSR
still great, HIAS will help
them to emigrate to wher-
ever ills they choose to go.
We will continue this policy
until such time when Jews
the world over are free to
determine their final desti-
nation."
Meanwhile, a small group
of Soviet emigrants living
in ,Vienna praised Austria
for its hospitality and de-
nounced, as "slanderous" a
petition of the heads of 87
Soviet Jewish families who
want to return to the Soviet
Union.

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