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October 29, 1976 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, October 29, 1976 31

Federation Annual Meeting Reviews Activities,
Honors Fresh Air Society and Butzel Awardee

EXECUTIVE SALES. Two persons will be
added to our sales staff, nationally
known corporation with home offices in

Hartford, wants individual capable of
calling on business and professional
p Ian plus
people, generous incentive ant only
management opportunity. W
those now earning $10,000 or more
e.
yearly and who desire more incom ho
Prefer individuals now employed w
want to move ahead. Call replies confi-
dential. No traveling. Dignified selling
opportunity for high caliber person. ,
Submit resume: Michael J. Bunting
1000 Travelers Tower, Southfield, MI
48076. An Equal Opportunity Employer

M-F.

Marking its own 50th
year, at the half-century
annual meeting held
Tuesday evening at the
Jewish -Community
Center in West Bloom-
field, the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Detroit de-
voted a portion of the as-
sembly to a tribute to the
Fresh Air Society's 75th
anniversary.
An impressive portion
of the annual Federation
report also was devoted to
the Fresh Air Society,
with an historical and
pictorial record of the so-
ciety and the communi-
ty's camping achieve-
ments.
The annual Federation
meeting heard reports
from President Martin
Citrin and associate offi-
cers in the year's activi-
ties.
A special feature of the
meeting was the presenta-
tion of the 1976 Fred M.
Butzel Memorial Award
for Distinguished Com-
munity Service to Jack 0.
Lefton.
Citrin expressed pride

5 lbs. of MATZO

,

If I can't Beat Your Best Deal

'ARNOLD MARGOLIS

Margolis Household Furniture
30 YEARS at the Same
OLD STAND 6 Mile, 1 Blk. W. of Schaefer
SHARPENING the PENCIL

On All Name Brands

Furniture and Bedding

•SCHOOLFIELD 'SELIG •SIMMONS 'SEALY •SERTA •SPRING AIR •LA-Z-
BOY •STIFFEL LAMPS •KROEHLER •AMERICAN •BURLINGTON •BASSETT
•BARCALOUNGER •LANE •UNIQUE
13703 W. McNichols 342-5351
Hrs. Mon thru Sat. 9:30 til 5:30
411 ■ 11=111111116

The Fred M. Butzel Memorial Award for Distin-
guished Community Service Was presented to Jack- 0.
Lefton, shown holding his award, at the annual meeting
of the Jewish Welfare Federation President Martin E.
Citrin, former President Mandell L. Berman and 1974
Butzel honoree Alan E. Schwartz.

in the services that are
provided by. the 75-year-
old Fresh Air Society by
giving priority to the ob-
servance of the society's
anniversary as the com-
mencing feature on the
evening's agenda.
Robert Kasle, respond-
ing to President Citrin's
congratulatory greeting,
as president of Fresh Air
Society, gave a birdseye
view of the camping serv-
ices sponsored by the so-
ciety, commencing with
the modest beginnings
and proceeding to the
current activities which
include functions for the
elderly as well as the
'camping youths.
Mrs. Dulcie Rosenfeld,
who is slated - for the
chairmanship of the wo-
men's division of the Al-
lied Jewish Campaign,
presented the slate of
newly-named members of
the Federation board of
governors and the follow-
ing were re-elected: Mrs.
N. Brewster Broder,
Samuel Hechtman, Her-
bert P. Sillman and Joel
D. Tauber.
Also elected were:

Elect

FLORENCE SALTZMAN

State Board of Education

Republican

• 19 Yrs of Education Experience

—Public Schools; president (73-'74) Birmingham Board of Education

—College: Current Member, Board of Control, Saginaw Valley State College
• Jewish Community Council Executive Committee

LEADERSHIP FOR MICHIGAN'S
LOCAL SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, LIBRARIES

bert M. Colman, David B.
Hermelin, Dr. Mark L.
Kahn, Michael W. Maddin
and Bruce E. Thal.
The Butzel award for the
current year was pre-
sented to Lefton by Alan
Schwartz, the 1974 Butzel
Award winner and a
former president of Fed-
eration.
Schwartz reviewed
Lefton's manifold com-
munal activities, in the
general and Jewish com-
munities, and welcomed
him to the ranks of hon-
orees for communal serv-
ices by virtue of his dedi-
cation to the needs for the
elderly, as a former presi-
dent of the Jewish Home
for the Aged, his Allied
Jewish Campaign activi-
ties and membership on
the boards of directors of
a number of agencies.
Lefton, describing his
reaction to the honor ac-
corded him as "an emo-
tional experience," af-
firmed that the respon-
sibilities to which he was
dedicated called for con-
tinued labors in support
of the many social serv-
ices included in the Fed-
eration program.
The annual Federation
meeting was occasion to
introduce the new Feder-
ation executive vice pres-
ident, Sol Drachler. It
was Drachler's inaugural
address to the major
community organization
and he outlined the
ideological and practical
aims inherent in the Fed-
eration agenda.
Federation President
Citrin utilized the event to
pay honor to Esther Prus-
sian for her many years of
services to the Detroit
Service Group and Feder-
ation, and to greet Rabbi
Seymour Rosenbloom,
who gave the invocation,
on his election as spiritual
leader of Adat Shalom
Synagogue.
In his presidential ad-
dress, Citrin, speaking on
behalf of the 600 members
of the boards of Feder-
ation-affiliated agen-
cies and the 3,000 volun-
teers who work in the Al-
lied Jewish Campaigns,
gave a thorough outline
of the achievements of
the current year and
ideologically defined
Federation objectives.
At the outset, touching
upon the successful Al-

lied Jewish Campaigns,
he pointed out that the
first such drive conducted
by the United Jewish
Charities netted $4,000
from 245 contractors.
Taking pride in the last
drive's $18 million total
from some 23,000 con-
tributions, Citrin said it
reaffirmed Detroit Jew-
ry's devotion to Israel's
needs by declaring:
"The survival of Israel
and her people was and
remains our first concern
and our highest priority. I
know I speak for every
Jew in Detroit when I say
that in the years ahead
we shall leave nothing
undone to measure up to
our responsibility for the
welfare of the state of Is-
rael. She symbolizes our
own determiniation to
live upright on our feet as
Jews."
Assaying the roles of the
score of local agencies af-
filiated with Federation,
Citrin rated the comple-
tion of the new Jewish
Center among the high
achievements.
He commended the ef-
forts. of the Jewish Voca-
' tional Service and its
Community Workship
among the highlights of
communal programming,
and cited Sinai Hospital
as another sign of the
Jewish community's
committment to the cen-
tral city.
He said, "In 1976 we
were able to keep pace
with car problems — par-
ticularly in financing our
beneficiaries. Many other
federations had to adopt
strict budgeting limita-
tions.
"We here in Detroit
were willing and able to
adopt a more generous
estimate of our capacity.
"Our goal on the local
scene was, and continues
to be, to improve the qual-
ity of Jewish life; and,our
basic stewardship is to
make the most effective
and-efficient use of com-
munity dollars and re-
sources throughout our
service programs."


Israeli Farming
Focus of Media

JERUSALEM (ZINS)
— Many countries are in-
trigued by the remark-
able success of Israel's
agriculture. Two leading
American journals, the
New York Times and
Newsweek magazine,
have sought the coopera-
tion of Israel's- Ministry of
Agriculture in the prep-
aration of special reports
on Israel's outstanding
success in this field.
In addition, a number
of American TV stations
have prepared material
on Israel's achievements
in agriculture and these
documentaries will soon
be shown to TV audiences
in the United States.
One West German TV
station in Koeln has pre-
pared a series of 10 pro-
grams dealing with Is-
rael's agricultural ac-
complishments. The pro-
grams will also be distri-
buted to a number of
South American- coun-
tries.

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