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September 10, 1976 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 Friday, September 10, 1976

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Almogi Predicts No Increase in Aliya; Blames the Shlikhim

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
osef Almogi, chairman
the World Zionist Or-
anization and Jewish
Igency Executives, pre-
cted that there will be
increase in immigra-
i on to Israel in 1977 and
amed the present sys-

t

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11

tern of "shlikhim" (emis-

saries) which he said had
failed.
He said that the Zionist
Federations in the vari-
ous countries must be-
come more active in aliya
and not leave it exclu-
sively to emissaries from
Israel.
Almogi made his re-
marks during a two-hour
meeting of the joint coor-
dinating committee of the
government and Jewish
Agency headed by Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin. The
meeting was attended by
most Cabinet ministers
and members of the WZO
Executive.
Almogi reported at
length on his recent visit
to Latin America. He re-
ported that after an in-

vestigation of the ac-
tivities of Zionist emis-
saries in Argentina,
Zionist activities were
not banned in that coun-
try. He was referring to
the release of five WZO
emissaries and three
local employes of the WZO
who were arrested in
Argentina July 22 and re-
leased Aug. 4.
Almogi reported at
length on his recent visit
to Latin America. He re-
ported that after an in-
vestigation of the ac-
tivities of Zionist emis-
saries in Argentina,
Zionist activities were
not banned in that coun-
try. He was referring to
the release of five WZO
emissaries and three
local employes of the WZO

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Columbia U. Cites
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WE'VE MOVED
TO PONTIAC

Packer Pontiac has the
newest and most complete
automobile dealership in
the country, encompassing
8 acres and 70,000 sq. ft. of
sales and service facilities.
The Packer 33 year tradition
of service and courtesy
remains the same,however.

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who were arrested in
Argentina July 22 and re-
leased Aug. 4.
However, Almogi ex-
pressed serious concern
over what he described as
open anti-Semitism in
Argentina, noting that one
could buy Nazi publica-
tions in any book shop. He
described the situation of
Jews in South America
generally, observing that
unstable conditions in var-
ious countries abroad did
not guarantee a rise in the
number of immigrants
coming to Israel.
Almogi said the present
system of sending
shlikhim from Israel to
promote aliya had not
proven successful. He
said that on his coming
visits to the U.S. and
South Africa he would
meet with the heads of
Zionist federations to dis-
cuss means of increasing
their involvement in
aliya.
Rabin said he would
like to see more govern-
ment ministers involved
in aliya. Menahem Sher-
man, director general of
the-Absorption Ministry
and Uzi Narkiss, head of
the Jewish Agency's aliya
department, were in-
structed at the meeting to
prepare background
material for a future
meeting of the coordinat-
ing body that would sum
up the discussion of aliya.

ONE MILE SOUTH
OF PONTIAC STADIUM

honored Soviet dissident
Vitaly Rubin at a special
reception celebrating his
successful struggle for
freedom.
The 52-year-old scho-
lar, an authority on an-
cient Chinese philosophy,
was welcomed by Colum-
bia President William J.
McGill, and others at Col-
umbia who fought long to
obtain his release from
the Soviet Union. Soviet
officials granted him an
exit visa in June to emig-
rate to Israel after four
years of harassment,
imprisonment and scho-
larly rejection.
The event also celeb-
rated the publication by
the Columbia University
Press of an English trans-
lation of Rubin's book,
"Individual and State in
Ancient China."
The volume, first pub-
lished in the Soviet Union
in 1970, was attacked and
suppressed by Soviet au-
thorities because, con-
trary to official Russian
ideology, it was critical of
totalitarian tendencies in
early China and treated
the humanist philosophy-
of Confucius sympatheti-
cally.
Following the event
Rubin returned to Israel
to take up a teaching post
at the Hebrew University
in Jerusalem.

The Right Way

PHONE 332-9300

A thing to which a fool
does not consent, know as
the right thing.
— Talmud

Taxes and Your Future

1

It is just as important
for a married woman to
have a will when her chil-
dren have grown up and
are on their own. Hope-
fully they will have chil-
dren. If they do, a trust
could be set up for them
and their children.

,

Editor's Note: Guidance
on important problems
provided by Jewish Wel-
fare Federation-United
Jewish Charities Endow-
ment Fund Tax Advisory
Committee. Professional
advice about issues dis-
cussed in these columns
should be secured from
your attorney or an estate
planning adviser. Ques-
tions of general interest in
these matters should be
addressed to "Taxes and
Your Future," care of the
Jewish News, 17515 W.
Nine Mile Road, South-
field, 48075.

When does a woman
need a will? (This is the
second column in a series
dealing with women's
needs for wills. For copies
of the first article, call C.
Kenneth Sarason at the
Federation office, 965-
3939.)
A married woman with
small children needs a
will to make sure her
husband will have access
to her part of the family
property in raising the
children if he outlives
her. If there is no will, the
state law divides her -
property between her
husband and the chil-
dren.
If the children are
minors, a guardian would
have to be appointed.
Under most cir-
cumstances the court
would no doubt appoint
the husband as guardian.
However, he would have
to report to the court. The
desirable plan may be to
have everything go to the
husband as sole heir.
That's easily ac-
complished with a will.
And the possibility of
simultaneous death of
both husband and wife in a
common disaster is .
another reason that a mar-
ried woman needs a will.
If she owns property
either in her name or
jointly with her husband,
her estate may incur
some probate expenses
and substantial federal
estate and state inheri-
tance taxes. A properly-
drawn will may reduce or
eliminate some of these
costs. It will also insure
that the estate gets full
advantage of the marital
deduction which allows a
spouse, to pass up to 50
percent of the adjusted
gross estate to the surviv-
ing spouse free of federal
tax.
Owning everything
jointly is not an adequate
substitute for a will. Joint
ownership can help cut
estate settlement costs in
some instances. However
it has good and bad fea-
tures, a subject we will
discuss in a future col-
umn.

If there is no will, the
state has already decided
who the heirs will be. But a
will which leaves assets to
your children, grandchil-
dren, and family can also
do other things, such as
remember a devoted
friend or neighbor.

A memorial to mother,
father, sister, brother, or
children, can also be set
up by a will. It's a triple
tribute — to the one
memorialized, to the
worthy cause benefited
and to the donor. When a
memorial is provided for
in a will, it is funded with
money or property no
longer needed for the
care of the owner.

A person helps many
causes during his
lifetime. A provision for
continued gifts when the
donor dies serves as a liv-
ing testimonial to the
donor. If other obliga-
tions come first, one can
always name the charity
of your choice as a re-
sidual or final be-
neficiary.

Even a modest estate
can cost in probate ex-
penses and federal estate
and state inheritance
taxes many times the at-
torney's small fee for writ-
ing a will.

Persons with questions
may contact C. Kenneth
Sarason, secretary of the
endowment program, at
the Federation office,
965-3939.

Seminar in Israel

JERUSALEM — Ten
years of Israeli adminis-
tration in Judea and
Samaria, the Gaza Strip
and the Golan Heights,
will come under the
scrutiny of scholars at a
seminar to be held in June
1977 by the Harry S. Tru-
man Research Institute
at the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem.

Political, economic and
social change in the ter-
ritories since June 1967
will be discussed, with a
special session devoted to
problems of integration
in Jerusalem in the ten
years since its unifica-
tion.
The seminar aims to
present, through sum-
maries of research and
practical experience, the
changes that occurred in
Jerusalem and the oc-
cupied areas as a result of
the encounter with Israel
since 1967 compared to the
previous period.
The Truman Institute
is preparing a basic
bibliography on
Jerusalem and the ter-
ritories, to be available to
the participants in the
coming academic year
and to be completed by
June 1977.

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