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July 09, 1976 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-07-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

18 Friday, July 9, 1976

Israel's Daring Uganda Raid Answers Terrorists

(Continued from Page 17)
gratulations on the success-
ful operation.

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Meanwhile, Transport
Minister Gad Yaacobi said
on a radio interview that he
wanted legal power to
tighten security measures
at Israel's airports so that
they apply to all airlines,
not only Israel's airlines.
A draft bill submitted to
the Knesset last week
would permit the govern-

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ment to penalize foreign
carriers who did not com-
ply with Israeli safety reg-
ulations anywhere along
their routes between Israel
and other countries.
The Air France jet hi-
jacked June 27 was seized
by heavily armed terrorists
who boarded undetected at
Athens Airport. In the in-
terim, Yaacobi asked all air-
lines serving Israel to dis-
continue intermediate
stops.

No Safeguards
at Athens Airport

The Jerusalem Post re-
ported that Israeli govern-
ment officials who have no
alternative but to fly on a
foreign airline have a stand-
ing order not to take Air
France. Sources said that
France, which has sup-
ported the PLO, felt im-
mune to terrorist activity
against its national carrier.
An Israeli security offi-
cer stationed at Athens
Airport, where the Tel
Aviv to Paris jumbo jet
had stopped over, said that
no special security Mea-
sures had been taken by
airport officials or Air
France apart from the
standard search of lug-
gage.
There was no body frisk-
ing, he said, although suita-
ble compartments and
metal detectors were avail-
able at the field. "Very few
airlines apart from El Al
carry out body searches
here," the officer said.
Two Israelis who re-
turned to Israel last week

from London by Air France
told the Jerusalem Post that
the airline made no effort to
search their bags before
their flight to Israel, even
though one carried along a
heavy valise as hand lug-
gage.

State Department
to Reveal Position

State Department spokes-
man Robert Funseth said
Wednesday in Washington
that the U.S. would make
known its position on legal
questions arising from the
Israeli rescue raid in
Uganda in the course of the
UN Security Council's de-
bate on that matter. The Se-
curity Council was re-
quested to convene by the
Organization for African
Unity (OAU), which is seek-
ing to condemn Israel for
violating Ugandan territory.
The legal question
brought up was whether or
not Israel violated the provi-
sions of the Foreign Mili-
tary Sales Act by employing
U.S.-made C-130 military
transports to carry out the
rescue of hostages.
Funseth said in a pre-
pared statement that
"Israel has received C-130s
and most other defense arti-
cles from the U.S. under the
Foreign Military Sales Act.
The arrangements made
with Israel, as with other
recipients under the act pro-
vides that such articles are
to be used for internal secu-
rity, legitimate self-den-
fense and to permit the re-
cipients to participate in
regional collective arrange-
ments or measures consist-
ent with the United Nations
Charter."
Asked by a reporter if
the Uganda operation vio-
lated any of these restric-
tions, Funseth replied,
"That gets into issues that
will be covered in the UN
Security Council debate.
Our position on these is-
sues will be made known
in the course of that de-
bate."
Israeli
Meanwhile,
sources indicated that they
consider the legal question
to be non-existent, and
pointed out that President
Ford's letter to Premier Yit-
zhak Rabin had endorsed
the entire Uganda opera-
tion.

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The far-flung legal rami-
fications are being probed
elsewhere here and abroad.
Among the questions are
whether Israel acted within
the internationally accepted
right of self-defense or
whether it violated the sov-
ereignty of Uganda;
whether the Ugandan re-
gime collaborated with the
Air France hijackers in viol-
ation of United Nations
statues; and whether Israel
may have contravened
terms of its arms purchases
from the United States by
using American-made mili-
tary transports and equip-
ment to carry out the res-
cue.
United Nations Secre-
tary General Kurt Wal-
dheim, questioned by re-
porters in Dar Es Salaam
and Cairo Monday, replied
affirmatively when asked

if he thought Israel had
committed a violation of
the national sovereignty of
Uganda and, according to
a report released by the
UN, warned that the inci-
dent was likely to have
serious international re-
percussions, especially in
Africa.
Waldheim's
position
prompted Paul O'Dwyer,
president of the New York
City Council, to consult ex-
perts on international law
at New York University and
Columbia University, on the
question of possible viola-
tion of Ugandan sovereignty
eignty. The opinion of the
experts, O'Dwyer reported,
was unanimous that Israel
had acted legally under the
doctrine of self-defense.
It was reported from
Washington, meanwhile,
that State Department legal
experts are studying both
the question of Israeli viola-
tion of Ugandan soveriegnty
and whether Israel flouted
the U.S. foreign military
sales act of 1961 by employ-
ing three C-130 military
transports to carry the res-
cue assault party to En-
tebbe and return the hos-
tages to Israel.
The Times of London sug-
gested Tuesday that Presi-
dent Idi Amin of Uganda
may himself have breached
the General Assembly's res-
olution of 1970 which stated
that every nation has the
duty to refrain from organ-
izing, instigating, assisting
or participating in terrorist
acts.
Although Amin denied
that he collaborated with
the Air France hijackers,
eye-witness accounts by
the returned hostages and
Israeli commandos who
took part in the rescue
operatiori indicated that
Ugandan troops, acting on
Amin's order, co-operated
with the hijackers and as-
sisted them in guarding
the hostages.
There was no indication
of who precipitated the
State Department probe of
the Israeli action. President
Ford himself was among the
first heads of state to con-
gratulate Israel on the suc-
cessful outcome of the
Uganda mission.
Rep. Bella Abzug (D-NY)
has asked the U.S. to intro-
duce a resolution into the
Security Council calling for
an investigation of reported
collusion between Amin and
the terrorist hijackers.
Abzug said Amin was ex-
tremely cooperative with
the hijackers and reportedly
added the names of five
Ugandans held in Kenya to
the list of prisoners in ex-
change for Jewish hostages.
"If further hijacking is to be
prevented, the UN and its
members states must unite
in barring any measure of
co-operation with political
desperadoes who kidnap
and endanger the lives of in-
nocent travellers," she said.

President Ford
Congratulates Israel

Israel's successful rescue
operation in Uganda elicited
messages of congratulations
from President Ford and
other administration offi-

cials and from the leaders of
American Jewish organiza-
tions. Ford said, in a letter
to Premier Yitzhak Rabin,
made public by the White
House last Tuesday, that
"The American people join
me in expressing our great
satisfaction that the passen-
gers of the Air France flight
seized earlier this week have
been saved and a senseless
act of terrorism thwarted."
Avi Pazner, press attache
at the Israeli Embassy here
reported that the embassy
was flooded with telegrams
and telephone calls of con-
gratulations all day Sunday.
Israeli diplomatic sources
noted, however, that Ford's
message was "unprece-
dented" because "no Ameri-
can President has ever con-
gratulated us on a military
action before, not even after
the Six-Day War."
Jerold C. Hoffberger,
president of the Council of
Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds, cabled Ra-
bin his warmest congratula-
tions in the rescue opera-
tion. "It is the essential
demonstration to the world
of courage and principle,"
Hoffberger stated.
Bertram H. Gold, execu-
tive vice president of the
American Jewish Commit-
tee praised the rescue as
promoting an eventual
peaceful settlement of the
Middle East conflict. "We
hope that this all proves
again the bankruptcy of
international terrorism
and that we can now pro-
ceed to the orderly and
peaceful settlement of the
problems of the Middle
East," Gold said.
The Bnai Brith Anti-
Defamation League said in
a cable to Rabin: "Your re-
fusal to capitulate gives the
only answer to terrorism."
Joseph P. Sternstein,
president of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America, sent
cables of congratulations to
Rabin and other Israeli
leaders. He stated that
"Freedom-loving people are
electrified with hope by the
magnificent prowess of Is-
rael's defense forces.
State Department sources
meanwhile confirmed Ra-
bin's statement to the Knes-
set Sunday that Israel
had mounted the rescue op-
eration entirely on its own
responsibility without con-
sulting any other govern-
ments beforehand. The
U.S., according to a Stall&
Department official, fir
learned of Israel's actio n
when Ambassador Simcha
Dinitz phoned Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger in
New York where the Ameri-
can official was over the
weekend to participate irit
the Bicentennial celebratioi
and for private reasons. At
that time the Israeli planes
were already on their way
to Uganda.
Commenting on the res-
cue, Yosef Almogi, chair-
man of the World Zionist
Organization and Jewish
Agency Executives, told
the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that the action had
international implica-
tions. He expressed hope
that the world will now
(Continued on Page 19)

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