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June 25, 1976 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEW15)1 NEWS!

June 25, 1976 17

Religious School Aid Rule Fought
Congressmen Urge Kissinger
to Denounce Soviet Parcel Tax

*ri

Resisting Kremlin attempts at total forcible assimiliation, Russian Jewish activ-
ists stage performances in private homes, in photos obtained by the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry. Leningrad Jews, left, enjoy an original Purim "spiel" in an apart-
ment decorated with handpainted Hebrew posters, while Kishinev activists Mark
Abramovich and Peter Roitburd, right, play leads in a Russian translation of Israeli
humorist Ephraim Kishon's "Hahefresh" — "The Difference."

* * *

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Fifty-two Congressmen
urged Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger to pub-
licly denounce the new So-
viet tax on parcels sent to
Jews and others in the So-
viet Union and to make for-
mal protests against the
levy to Communist Party
Secretary General Leonid I.
Brezhnev and to the Soviet
Ambassador to the U.S.,
Anatoly F. Dobrynin.
Rep. Joshua Eilberg (D-
Pa.) made public the con-
tents of a letter to Kissinger
initiated by him and signed
by himself and 51 of his
House colleagues. The letter
points out that most Soviet
citizens will no longer be
able to•receive packages
from abroad because the So-
viet authorities have in-
creased the duty by
100-1,000 percent depending
on the items enclosed.

Meanwhile, hardships,
harassment and delay con-
tinue to be the lot of Soviet
Jews applying for emigra-

tion visas according to the
latest information from- the
Soviet Union.. In Kishinev,
where newspapers have car-
ried anti-Zionist and anti-
Semitic articles in recent
weeks, applicants who were
granted visas have been
forced to evacuate their
apartments one month be-
fore their scheduled depar-
ture for Israel.
Jewish sources reported
that Boris Shtern, a mem-
ber of the journalists'
union in Kaliningrad, has
been refused an exit visa
and his son, Maurice, has
been threatened with con-
scription into the army.
In Moscow, Joseph Elk-
ind, a lawyer who once
headed a colony for the re-
habilitation of juvenile de-
linquents, has applied for an
emigration visa but has re-
ceived no reply. He fears he
may be turned down be-
cause his former employer
was the ministry of interior.
A group of Jewish army
veterans in Moscow who
were refused visas because

Hadassah Dedicates Pavilion
at Mt. Scopus Hospital Site

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Hadassah dedicated the
Daniel and Florence Gug-
genheim Rehabilitation
Pavilion at its Scopus Hos-
pital June 15.
The pavilion, comprising
theentire eastern wing of
the hospital, has 60 beds,
Ind is equipped with the lat-
est and most sophisticated
equipment needed to reha-
bilitate those afflicted by
war, accident, stroke or
other causes.
The main donors of the $7
million building are the
members of the Guggen-
leim family of New York,
,461; who helped to build the orig-
inal Mount Scopus Hospital,
nd 27,954 individual West
rman citizens, who con-
, ributed to a fund organized
by Axel Springer, the Ger-
man newspaper publisher,
and the Jerusalem Founda-
tion.
"The pavilion will serve
patients, not only from Is-
rael, but from Cyprus,
Turkey, Iran and even

*

from Arab countries offi-
cially at war with Israel,"
said Charlotte Jacobson,
Hadassah building and
development chairman,
who presided at the dedi-
cation ceremony.
Rose Matzkin is national
president of Hadassah.
Faye Schenk is national
chairman of the Hadassah
Medical Organization.

'Social Change Up
to Kibutz Residents'

TEL AVIV (JTA) — Some
600 delegates, representing
three generations of kibutz
members, gathered at She-
fayim last week for the an-
nual convention of Hakibutz
Hameuchad, the kibutz
movement of the Achdut
HaAvoda faction.
Itzhak Ben Aharon, ad-
dressing the organization
which has 19,000 members
in 60 kibutzim all over Is-
rael, said the kibutz move-
ment must be the spearhead
for social change in the
country.

of their military service,
took their case directly to
the Soviet Defense Ministry
last month. They were in-
terviewed separately and"
told their cases would be
reviewed.
Thirty-four Jewish activ-
ists in Minsk, among them
former Red Army Col. Lev
Ovischer, have signed a peti-
tion to the Soviet govern-
ment urging it to resume
diplomatic relations with
Israel in the interests of
Middle East peace. Ovischer
had applied for a visa to go
to Israel but was refused.
It was reported; mean-
while, that the widow of
the late Col. Yefim Davi-
dovich, the Red Army hero
who died in Minsk last
April, has applied for an
emigration visa for her-
self, her daughter and
grandson. Her husband
had been repeatedly re-
fused a visa on grounds of
security.
In a related development,
Prof. Vitaly Rubin, a lead-
ing Moscow Jewish activist,
arrived in Israel with his
wife last week after a 41/2
year struggle to leave the
Soviet. Union.
Rubin, an expert on an-
cient China, said he will
continue to serve as a
watchdog on Soviet compli-
ance with the Universal
Declaration of Human
Rights.
Rubin has a chair waiting
for him at Hebrew Univer-
sity and has been invited to
lecture at Columbia Univer
sity and other American
schools.

In Mexico City, an offi-
cial of the Soviet Embassy
here, for the first time,
received a delegation of
the Mexican Jewish Stu-
dents Union and accepted
a memorandum addressed
to Soviet Premier Alexei
Kosygin with respect to
the situation of Jewish
political prisoners in the
USSR.

Valery Morozoff, Third
Secretary at the Embassy,
promised the students that
their document, containing
the names of 31 prisoners,
would be forwarded to Ko-
sygin.

NEW YORK (JTA) — An
Orthodox leader here said
an appeal will be made to
the U.S. Supreme Court
from a decision by a federal
court in Manhattan voiding
as unconstitutional a 1974
New York State law reim-
bursing religious schools for
the costs of state-mandated
testing and record-keepoing.
At the same time, Sidney
Kwestel, president of the
National Jewish Commis-
sion on Law and Public Af-
fairs (COLPA) said COLPA
believes that the 1974 law
does not violate previous
Supreme Court rulings in
that area of public assist-
ance. Kwestel also said that
COLPA intends to file a
brief in support of Jewish
day school and yeshiva stu-
dents in any appeal of the
decision.
Rabbi Moshe Shere, exec-
utive president of Agudath
Israel of America, in report-
ing that the lower court de-
cision would be appealed,
"by a group of non-public
schools," called the lower
court decision "a serious
error in judgment."
Rabbi Bernard Golden-
berg, director of school
organization and profes-
sional services of Torah
Umesorah, the National
Society for Hebrew Day
Schools, also criticized the
decision. Declaring that
there are some 200 yeshi-
vot and Hebrew day
schools in the state, he
said that, at this time of
inflation, they would "feel
this financial blow."
The special three-judge
federal court struck down a
provision of the 1974 state
law under which the state
paid up to $10 million a year
to the non-public schools for
the costs of administering
Regents examinations,

keeping pupil attendance
records and other state-
mandated paperwork.
The 1974 law represented
a state effort to meet U.S.
Supreme Court objections
to a 1970 state law providing
for such reimbursement,
which the Supreme Court
struck down an unconstitu-
tional.
Kwestel said the 1974
law, unlike the 1970 law,
requires strict accountabil-
ity for the manner and the
purposes , for which reim-

bursement is made to the
non-public schools and that
for this reason, COLPA be-
lieved the 1974 law was con-
stitutional.

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U.S. Ship Cancels
Rest Stop in Haifa



TEL AVIV, (JTA) — The
U.S. Navy cancelled the visit
of the guided missile cruiser
Yarnell which was due at
Haifa last Wednesday for a
four-day rest and relaxation
stay for her officers and
crew. The reason given was
routine operational require-
ments. Sources here believe
that the Sixth Fleet alert
over the situation in Leba-
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