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May 21, 1976 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6 May 21, 1976

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Arabs'UN Anti-Zionist Stand Backfired in the U.S.

(Continued from Page 1)

abroad. Much of this re-
sponse was immediate and
spontaneous, and it came
from every level of the or-
ganized Christian church
community — from the
leadership of the national
Catholic, Protestant, Evan-
gelical and Orthodox insti-
tutions, from regional and
local church groups, and
from individual clergy, aca-
demicians and religious
journalists."

Miles Jaffe of Detroit,
national chairman of the
AJCommittee's Interreli-
gious Affairs Commission,

announced that the study
would be used as the basis
of Jewish-Christian dia-
logues in numerous re-
gions throughout the
United States.
Examination of the Chris-
tian reactions, according to
the study, indicates that
reaction to the UN resolu-
tion was independent of cus-
tomary political attitudes
on Middle East issues. Lead-
ers of church groups often
critical of Israel, as well as
those friendly to Israel, de-
nounced the UN action, per-
ceiving it not only as anti-Is-
rael and anti-Zionist, bit as
anti-Semitic.

Tanenbaum noted that
among those condemning
the anti-Zionist resolution
were Archbishop Joseph
Bernadin, president of the
National Conference of
Catholic Bishops; Dr. Rob-
ert Moss, president of the
United Church of Christ;
Dr. Philip A. Potter, general
secretary of the World
Council of Churches; Jan
Cardinal Willebrands, pres-
ident of the Vatican's Secre-
tariat for Promoting Chris-
tian Unity; as well as the
National Catholic Confer-
ence for Interracial Justice.
Meanwhile, the Rev. An-
drew M. Greeley, a well-

Father Greeley said that
"Americans admire the
spunk and modernity of Is-
rael and support it strongly.
Would such support survive
another oil embargo? No
nation would be wise to try
to blackmail the United
States for very long; they
would find it extremely
counterproductive."
Father Greeley, however,
urged that Catholics and
Jews undertake joint re-
search on their relationship,
especially in the New York
metropolitan area. He felt
that misunderstandings
could grow unless they were
carefully analyzed and re-
medied. Judaism and Chris-
tianity, he said, had far
more in common than had
previously been thought,

known Catholic priest, so-
ciologist and author, de-
clared that the general rela-
tionship between American
Catholics and American
Jews was excellent and that
there had been no decline in
"the overwhelming Catholic
support for the American
alliance with Israel."
Father Greeley is the
director of the Center for
the Study of American
Pluralism at the National
Opinion Research Center
at the University of Chi-
cago.
Speaking at the AJCom-
mittee annual meeting,

Athletes Look to Games; IOC Bans Memorial

BY HASKELL COHEN

(Copyright 1976, JTA, Inc.)

Israel apparently is going
to bring over quite a few
athletes for participation in
the Olympic Games. The
soccer team, originally
rated an outside chance to
qualify as a representative
for the Asian countries, has
passed with flying colors by
defeating Japan and South
Korea.
The basketball team, on
the other hand, must qual-
ify in the pre-Olympic
Game competition which
will be open to some 12
teams at Hamilton, Ontario
a week prior to the Olympic
Games themselves. Israel
has only an outside chance
of qualifying for the games
proper. Only three of the
teams participating in the
pre-Olympic eliminations
will be certified for the
Games, and based on Is-
rael's record against some of
the competition, it seems

fiagegumit
13cethet Saha

is pleased
to announce

unlikely they will sneak
through. The fact that not
all of the best players in Is-.
rael are eligible to play will
mitigate the chances of the
club.
A player must be a citizen
of a country for three years
before he or she becomes eli-
gible to represent that coun-
try, and in basketball that
will eliminate Bruce Ka-
plan, formerly of Rutgers;
Eric Minkin of Davison; and
Lou Silver of Harvard, all of
whom are stars on the Israel
National League.
In addition to qualifying
in soccer, in all likelihood
eight athletes, headed by
Esther Roth, will partici-
pate in track and field,
swimming, wrestling and
rifle shooting.
Meanwhile, the Israel
Olympic Committee is en-
countering massive resist-
ence from the International
Olympic Committee to es-
tablishing some sort of me-
morial for the fallen Munich
11, at the opening ceremo-
nies of the Games in Mon-
treal or at any subsequent
period during the run of the
Olympics, between July 17
and Aug. 1.

ture will not be delved into
by the IOC. IOC members
pointed out to Glovinsky
that after World War II
where so many men and
women fell during the con-
flict, an attempt was made
to memorialize those who
fell in the fray. At this time,
in 1948, the Olympics were
held in London, and the IOC
stood steadfast by its deci-
sion not to get itself involved
in what it terms "a political
area," and consequently re-
fused to observe a moment
of silence.
Efforts are being made
by interested organiza-
tions in Canada- and the
United States to come up
with a solution, and it is
believed that a memorial

service may be conducted
in a temple or synagogue
in Montreal.
However, the Canadian
government has banned
demonstrations from one
week prior to one week after
the Games.
In addition to the Israel
matter, the Russians want
to counter with a memorial
service for the 100 or more
Mexican students who were
killed in an uprising prior to
the Mexican Games in 1968,
the Quebec seperatists want
to demonstrate against the
presence of Queen Elizabeth
at the Olympics, and teach-
ers who have been on strike
in Canada want to pull off a
huge show of sympathy for
their cause.

with scholars constantly
uncovering linkages and
connections through histori-
cal, archeological and theo-
logical research.

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JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Israel'' will continue to fight
for a fitting tribute to be
held at the Montreal Olym-
pics in memory of the 11 Is-
raeli athletes killed at the
Munich games four years
ago.
Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon and Education Minis-
ter Aharon Yadlin met with
leaders of the Israeli Olym-
pic Committee and decided
to continue pressure upon
friendly governments on
this issue.
Israel is demanding that
the 'memory of the massa-
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during the Montreal open-
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