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April 30, 1976 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

18 April 30, 1976

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Neo-Nazism Gaining Support,
Prominence in West Germany

BONN (JTA) — A
45-year-old lecturer at a
Berlin teachers' training
college was dismissed after
telling his students the
death of six million Jews
under the Third Reich was
"all lies." Although inci-
dents like this are by no
means commonplace in
West Germany, they indi-
cate a recent disturbing
trend, namely an increas-
ingly daring openness
among neo-Nazi and other
far right groups in the Fed-
eral Republic.
A report just issued by
the Bonn Interior Ministry
goes further "At no time
since the collapse of 1945," it
says, "has National Social-
ism been glorified so openly
in speeches, pamphlets and
activities — or the demo-
cratic, law-based state been
so despised by its opponents
— as today."
The report singles out as
"particularly striking" the
activities of right-wing at-
torney Manfred Roeder,
leader of the German Citi-
zens Initiative, and journal-
ist Erwin Schoenborn of the
Battle Group of German
Soldiers.
The two were recently
sentenced to seven months
imprisonment (suspended)
and fines of $1,200 each for
"incitement" after dis-
tributing a pamphlet
called "The Auschwitz
Lie" which denied the ex-
istence of gas chambers
and the deaths of six mil-
lion Jews under Nazi rule.
Another court case that
has raised eyebrows is the
trial of nine men and six
women charged with com-
plicity in mass murders at
the Maidanek concentration
camp in Poland. The trial,
which began last November,
has been held up by a series
of defense objections, nota-
bly against allowing Ger-
man historian Wolfgang
Schleffer, 46, an acknowl-
edged expert on the Nazi pe-
riod, to give evidence.
The defense claimed he
was too young to appreciate
the pressures Germans
were subjected to by the Na-
zis, that his knowledge of
the period had been influ-
enced by Jewish teachers,
and that he had contact
with Jewish people, or at
least people with Jewish-
sounding names.
Although the court has
not upheld the objections, it
has not rejected them out of
hand. Instead it has insisted
that Dr. Schleffer give de-
tailed replies to the defense
claims. During the trial, lea-
flets were circulated enti-
tled "Ann Frank's Diary —
a Forgery." A neo-Nazi
Group whose goal is to end
Nazi war crimes trials held
a special press conference in
Dusseldorf to declare that
all such trails up to now had
been based on forged evi-
dence.
It is difficult to gauge
the strenth of neo-Nazi
organizations in Germany.
The magazine "Spiegel"
last year reported the
spread of the "New
Right," a "new look" neo-

Nazi group estimated,to
number about 1,000 mem-
bers, including high school
pupils and university stu-
dents.
The group was created by
a breakaway from the right-
wing National Democratic
Party (NPD) in 1971, by
younger members who
found the NPD too old-fash-

ioned and too pro-capitalist.
It would be wrong to as-
sume from all this that Naz-
ism is reviving and that a
Fourth Reich is in the mak-
ing. The new clamor of the
neo-Nazis is, however, fa-
vored by the current reces-
sion and the presence of
over one million unem-
ployed in West Germany.

Jewish Computer Dating
Service Operates in NY

BY BEN GALLOB

(Copyright 1976, JTA, Inc.)

A synagogue-sponsored
effort to use the techniques
of computerized matching
of singles, designed to avoid
the abuses often attending
similar efforts for introduc-
tions under commercial
sponsorship, has been
launched by the New York
Metropolitan Region of the
United Synagogue of Amer-
ica.
Rabbi Morris Feldman,
director of the office, said
the project is based on a
carefully-developed "Jewish
Singles introduction Serv-
ice" questionnaire.
The recipient gets a ques-
tionnaire of letterhead size
in width and about two feet
in length, with 42 questions
to be answered. These cover
education; occupation; cur-
rent marital status; depend-
ent children; religious pre-
ference; membership in a
synagogue and its name;
membership in any Jewish
organizations and their
names; personal ranking of
religious convictions from
very strong to none.
The questionriaire also
asks whether the recipient
keeps kosher, smokes or
drinks (and how much);
current state of health:
physical defects; lan-
guages spoken; and simi-
lar questions. The fee is
nominal.
The oroiect involves a se-
ries of stages. The starting
point is receipt of a com-
pleted questionnaire. Each
is promptly acknowledged
and the individual notified
that he or she will soon re-

Jewish, Christian
Amity Is Sought

CINCINNATI — A Jew-
ish scholar and new testa-
ment specialist, Dr. Samuel
Sandmel, professor at He-
brew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, has
called for increased com-
munications between Jew-
ish and Christian academics
as an essential avenue to
continue "amity, under-
standing and mutual re-
gard" between the faith
groups.
In the presence of Chris-
tian and Reform Jewish
leaders, Dr. Sandmel was
awarded an honorary doctor
of laws degree by Xavier
University. The degree was
presented in recognition of
the scholar's "distinguished
career," a tribute to the
HUC-JIR centennial and to
stress the more than a cen-
tury of religious leadership
provided by both institu-
tions in this country and in
Cincinnati.

ceive the names and tele-
phone numbers only — no
addresses — of prospective
dates with matching inter-
ests.
The project is aimed at
college students, widows,
and widowers and senior
citizens. The minimum age
is 18. Rabbi Feldman said
there was a large number of
highly educated persons and
well-established profession-
als in the initial returns,
suggesting that loneliness in
modern America is not re-
stricted to the social failures
by any means.

Anti-Israel Cartoon Blasted

MEMPHIS (JTA) — The
Memphis Jewish Commu-
nity Relations Council has
written a letter to the Mem-
phis Commercial Appeal in
which it deplores a cartoon
published in the daily news-
paper on April 2 as "an of-
fensive depiction of the Is-
raeli or Jewish stereotype."
The complaint was in the
form of a letter sent by Mor-
ris Kriger, president of the
Memphis Jewish Welfare
Fund, and Lewis Kramer,
president of the Memphis
Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council.

have seen the cartoon in
the Commercial Appeal
and wondered if this
meant a change in the pap-
er's policy. "If so it would
appear that this policy is
blatantly anti-Semitic,
they said.



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According to the Hebrew
Watchman, which carried
the letter on its editorial
page, the cartoon depicted
Israel as an octupus holding
on to Arab occupied land,
shedding tears and telling
"Uncle Sam" that "Sob ! You
know I can't stand criti-
cism." "Uncle Sam," looking
amazed, points to Sadat
while an Arab says "One
man's aid is another man's
tantrum."

IT'S BECAUSE OF
LEADERSHIP IN SALES
AND SERVICE

FULL SERVICE IN:






In the letter, the two lo-
cal Jewish leaders said "It
is somewhat frightening
and very disturbing" to

Nature of Jewish Elderly
to Change, Sociologist Says

NEW YORK — The na-
ture of the Jewish elderly
will change in the near fu-
ture — from a mostly immi-
grant, poorly educated, low-
income group to a larger
group with more income,
more education, and higher
levels of occupation — and
the communal agencies
serving the elderly must be
prepared to meet these new
needs, according to a new
book by New York social
work educator Dr. Celia B.
Weisman.
"The Future Is Now: A
Manual for Older Adult
Programs in Jewish Com-
munal Agencies" is a joint
project of the Brookdale
Foundation and the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare
Board.
Dr. Weisman is associate
professor of social work at
Wurzweiler School of Social
Work of Yeshiva University.
According to Dr. Weis-
man, the shift in the sta-
tus of the Jewish aging
"has already made itself
evident, but is expected to
become more prominent."
Citing statistics from the
National Jewish Population
Survey, completed in 1971
by the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare
Funds, she reports the fol-
lowing:
• As the number of eld-
erly increases, so will the
proportion of elderly to the
total Jewish population;
• Future retirees will be
better educated;
• There will be more re-
tirees from administrative
and professional positions
in the future;
• Increasing numbers of
under 65's will retire early;
• The striking poverty of
today's elderly Jewish popu-
lation will probably lessen
in the future as those with
more education, higher level
jobs, better pension plans,
and increased social secu-



rity move into retirement;
and
• The number of Ameri-
can-born elderly will in-
crease.

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