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April 09, 1976 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

Nathan's favor, he still had
not collected by 1791.
In 1787, Nathan had to
announce his bankruptcy;
he continued as an aucti-
oneer in New York.
Simon and Grace Nathan
are the great-grandparents
of Emma Lazarus, Jose-
phine Lazarus, Maud Na-
than, Annie Nathan Meyer,
U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Benjamin Nathan Cardozo,
Robert Nathan and N.Y.
State Supreme Court Jus-
tice Edgar J. Nathan Jr.

Editor, Jewish Currents

SIMON NATHAN

marked intellectual gifts"
who left "a few unpublished
poems and intimate family
letters."
A patriot in '76, she could
write about the War of 1812,
". I am so true an Ameri-
can — so warm a patriot
that I hold these mighty Ar-
mies — and their proud-ar-
rogant-presumptuous and
over-powering Nation as
beings that we have con-
quered and shall conquer
again. . . ."
In 1782, Simon Nathan
was the first president of

Georgia Picks Jew
as Its Police Chief

SAVANNAH, Ga. (JTA.)
— Savannah has a new pol-
ice chief who holds two mas-
ters degrees from Michigan
State University, is working
on his doctorate and is Jew-
ish.
His name is David Ep-
stein and he is the second
Jew to hold the office of pol-
ice chief in the history of
Wthis bastion of the Old
South. The first was
Charles Garfunkle who
served from 1903-1907 and
whose son, Benjamin M.
Garfunkle, served as Mayor
Pro Tern in the late 1960s.
Chief Epstein came from
Iowa City, Iowa, where he
was chief of police.'
The local Jewish commu-
nity, meanwhile, is celebrat-
ing the 100th anniversary of
the Mickve Israel Syn-
agogue which still serves the
congregation' that claims to
be the oldest in the South.

NEW YORK — A "just-
in-case" pool of volunteer
workers to assist the state
of Israel on 'a civilian level, if
that nation should be en-
gaged in war again, is being
organized by American and
Canadian trade unionists
and businessmen, said Al
Bazel, executive director of
the new group.
Bazel recalled that when
the Yom Kippur Arab at-
tack on Israel in 1973 forced
sudden mobilization of that
nation, 14,000 Americans
offered to take civilian in-
dustrial jobs to replace con-
scripted Israelis. But there
were inadequate prepara-
tions to utilize such volun-
teers.
To eliminate such diffi
culties in any future emer-
gency, Americans and Can-
adians with Trade Skills for
Israel (ACTS) has been or-

Jewish Agency
Budget Approved
at $502 Million

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
According to Treasurer Ar-
yeh Dulzin, the Jewish
Agency's budget for 1976/77
has been approved at $502
million as compared with
$473 million the year before.
Dulzin noted that the new
budget is based on an ex-
pected immigration of 35,-
000 whose cost of absorption
alone would be $90 million.

• American of Martinsville
• Broyhill
• Lane
• Dixie
• Serta-Spring-aire
• A Complete Line of convertibles and
dinette sets
Special orders Accepted

NAT phone
MARGOLIS
FURNITURE
2930

(305) 561-0600

N. Federal Hwy.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33308,

At holiday time...
warming hearts in Jewish homes
for 100 years!

the re-organized Congre-
gation Mikveh Israel.
When he moved to New
York, he was president of
Shearith Israel in 1785,
1786, 1794 and 1796.
By 1781, he was a Mason,
with the title deputy grand
inspector general for North
Carolina.
Although living in afflu-
ence in Philadelphia, he had
difficulty collecting the
debts due him by Virginia.
He sued twice; even though
the later jurist John Mar-
shall as arbitrator ruled in

At holiday time — and

Emergency Group for Israel
Formed in U.S. and Canada

GRACE SEIXAS
only one child, Isaac Mendes
Seixas Nathan, a banker
and one of the first mem-
bers of the N. Y. Stock Ex-
change.
Grace Nathan is de-
scribed as "a woman of

formerly of Detroit, Mich.
serving you in Florida
with quality brand name
furniture at discount prices.

Revolutionary Financier

By MORRIS SCHAPPES

Simon Nathan was a
prominent and patriotic
merchant, an active com-
munal leader and a progeni-
tor of a distinguished line of
writers, jurists and other
public figures.
Born in Frome,- England,
he was a trader in Spanish
Havana before coming to
New York in 1773. In
1776-77 he was a merchant
in Jamaica, British West
Indies. When the British
found out he had been ship-
ping canvas, cordage and
powder to the American
rebels, he fled, abandoning
his property.
First he went to the
French colony of New Or-
leans but by 1779 he was in
Williamsburg, Va. In
March, 1780, he was
thanked by Gov. Thomas
Jefferson and the Council of
Virginia for advancing
$52,000 in specie to that
state.
In June, 1780, when Jef-
ferson announced that 500
men at Fort Pitt needed
clothing, Nathan provided
another $5,000 in specie.
Going to Philadelphia,
Nathan was enrolled in
Capt. Andrew Geyer's 3rd
Co. of Pennsylvania Mili-
tia.
Aug. 29, 1780 Simon Na-
than married Grace Seixas,
sister of the Rev. Gershom
Mendes Seixas. They had

April 9, 1976 23

NAT MARGOLIS FURNITURE

A Bicentennial Feature

Simon Nathan

DitR01111Wits NEW

ganized to enlist civilian vol-
unteers, computerize their
skills and provide for the
logistics of a mobilization to'
assist Israel, if the need
should arise.
The creation of the new
group has ,been • welcomed
by the Israeli Ministry of
Labor.
Headquarters of ACTS,
where applications may be
filed, are at 345 West 44th
St., New York, N.Y. 10036.

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on for rich, hearty "tiny
tea leaf flavor" that never
fades. Perfect for both meat and
dairy meals, at snack time, tea time, -
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pick- me-up, make your tea Tetley.
The favorite in Jewish homes since 1875.

TETLEY.
TEA
A CENTURY OLD TRADITION

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moth

Certified Kosher for Passover
by Rabbi Jacob Cohen

Periever

Our
Wish Made Just for
You is Very Warm and Special too
May Happiness, Good Health, Good Cheer
Fill This Passover and All the Year.

MICHIGAN NATIONAL BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

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