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April 02, 1976 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

`April 2, 1976 29

THE 'DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Hebrew Union College Marks Centennial; Wise Role Recalled

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright 1976, JTA, Inc.)

The Hebrew Union Col-
lege, celebrating this year
the first centennial of its
founding, has provided
many scholarships to.enable
young aspirants for the rab-
binate to pursue their stud-
ies.
The founder of the He-;
brew Union College, Rabbi
Isaac M. Wise, was a very

interesting man. He was not
only a rabbi but also a
farmer. In his early days, he
had a little farm near Cin-
cinnati.
He also got out one of the
first Anglo-Jewish papers in
the country — The Ameri-
can Israelite. The paper ca-
tered to the German Jews
who began coming into the
country in the decade before
the Civil War, and most of

them, like the Russian Jew-
ish immigrants of later
years, knew little English.
He was determined to keep
such readers as he got and
went so far to achieve this
as to write a romantic novel
which he serialized in the
paper.
To establish a rabbini-
cal college in the city of
Cincinnati at that time
Was in itself something
daring. It was a vital
town, but no New York.
The college was begun in
the year the country cele-
brated the first centennial
of its existence and inter-
estingly enough, the city of
Cincinnati also owes its
existence to the events of
f776.
The Order of the–Cincin-
nati was the name of the or-
ganization of the veterans of
the American Revolution.
Named after Cincinnatus,.
the RoniaTn who after lead-
ing the country to victory,
returned to_the plow, the
city of Cincinnati was
founded by veterans of the
Revolutionary army. Thus,
in a kind of mystic way, the
beginning of American in-
dependence, the beginning
of Cincinnati and the begin-
ning of the Hebrew Union

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Fortunately, some
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The ancient traditions remain, generation after genera-
tion. And today, we observe Passover as our forefathers
did thousands of years ago.
For almost a century, the old-fashioned goodness of
Manischewitz has ushered in festive holiday dinners in
Jewish homes all over America. This year, once again,
Manischewitz matzo, gefilte fish, soup and other delect-
ables will grace any traditional table.
Treat your family and friends to a taste of tradition,
too. And have a good Passover!

For traditional goodness you
can count on.

Manischewitz

QUALITY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649

Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision Certificate on request

NEW YORK — A new
master's degree program in
social work which allows
students to work at Jewish
community agencies during
the year and take formal
classroom studies during
the summer will begin in
June at Yeshiva University's
Wurzweiler School of Social
Work in New York.
The program consists of
two summers of academic
classroom work, each fol.-
lowed by an agency field
placement period from Sep-
tember through May.
For information, contact
Dr. Lloyd Setleis, Dean,
Wurzweiler School of Social
Work, Yeshiva University,
55 Fifth Ave., New York,_N.
Y. 10003.

Minister Sought
in the Knesset

JERUSALEM (JTA).—
.Knesset Speaker Yisrael
Yeshayahu stood on the
dignity of the House and
suspended a session for
close to an hour while a
Minister — any minister —
was sought. to be present
during the budget debate.
While there is no specific
rule requiring that a minis-
ter attend Knesset debates,
the Speaker felt that it was
an insult to the House that
the Cabinet table was de-
serted .during-the debate on
the government's budget.
Finance Minister Ye-
hoshua Rabinowitz himself
was busy hosting U.S. Sec-
retary of the Treasury Wil-
liam Simon. At last, Com-
merce Minister Haim Barley
was . located and he hurried
over'to the House — where-
upon Yeshayahu allowed
the debate to continue.

College are linked.
Also another reason was
that Cincinnati seemed to
attract many of the German
Jewish settlers. The first
large matza making estab-
lishment — Manischewitz
— was originally located in
Cincinnati.
Rabbi Wise came to
America in the late 40's — a
very hopeful period as far as
America was concerned —
except of course for the ter-
rible slavery business. "All
Europe is a dungeon," wrote
Heine, "and America is the
only escape."
One gathers the hopeful
note in a little incident told
by Rabbi Wise of a conver-
sation with Daniel Webs-
ter and Judah P. Benja-
min, the Jewish senator
from Louisiana, in which
Webster said they were all
of the same faith-- since
he was a Unitarian. Only
in America could one find
a man of the stature of
Webster claiming kinship
with Jews. And Seward,
who was to be Lincoln's
Secretary of State, im-
pressed by a book written
by Wise, took him to the

White House to meet the
President.
Many, no doubt, had a vi-
sion of America as the final
solution to the Jewish prob-
lernand Reform Judaism in
its beginning was not
friendly to Zionism, but
later years was to . see a
change. The college has
graduated some of the top

leaders of the Zionist move-
ment, such men as Silver,
Brickner and Heller.

fine clothes for 40 years
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ENJOY THIS PASSOVER
WITH THE FINEST
KOSHER L'PESACH PRODUCTS

ro no

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For over thirty-five years, families
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for all their Kosher cooking.
On Passover and all year through.
They like-it because ifs pure, light and
polyunsaturated. So the true taste
of the food comes through. Try
this traditional Passover recipe
and see what we mean. Cook it -with
Kosher and Parve Planters Oil.
And Happy Passover.

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Tel: 931-0300

A Passover
Recipe
from the
Passover Oil

COQ AU VIN FOR PASSOVER
Makes 6 servings

1 (3-pound) frying chicken. cut up
2 tablespoons Planters" Peanut Oil
8 small white onions. peeled
4 carrots. peeled and cut into thirds
4 scallions. sliced crosswise
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 cups dry white wine
1 /2 pound small mushroom caps
2 tablespoons potato starch
2 tablespoons water
Chopped parsley
Wash chicken pieces; blot dry with paper
towels: Heat Planters Peanut Oil in Dutch
oven over moderate heat. Add chicken
pieces in a single layer and brown well on all
sides. Set chicken aside. Pour off all but 2
tablespoons fat from Dutch oven. Add
onions, carrots and scallions. Saute until
onions begin to brown. Return chicken to
pot. Sprinkle in salt and pepper. Pour in
wine. Simmer covered for 25 minutes.
Mix in mushroom caps. Simmer covered for
an additional 20 minutes. Blend together
potato starch and water. Quickly stir into hot
liquid. Cook 1 minute longer.
Serve garnished with chopped parsley.

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by Rabbi Bernard Levy.

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