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February 27, 1976 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

14 Friday, February 27, 1976

TaisgrorrEwisH

NEWS

Israeli Economic Minister Proclaims 1976
as Israel's Year to Correct Home Problems

MIAMI BEACH (JTA) —
Zev Sher, Israel's economic
minister in the United
States, speaking at the 10th
annual conference of the
Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion, said that "1976 is Is-
rael's self-help year."
Sher emphasized "there is
no crisis in Israel, but its

problems are severe and re-
quire more than the usual
corrective measures sug-
gested in econimic text
books."
He stated that Israel
would try to achieve eco-
nomic self-sufficiency by
the mid-1980s when it
would no longer require

substantial American as-
sistance. Israel's economic
problems stem from two
sources, he said, its heavy
military needs and the im-
pact of the Arab boycott
which has made it more dif-
ficult to find foreign mar-
kets.
Countering this, Israel
is seeking customers in the
European Common Mar-
ket and the United States,.
where the American Jew-
ish community can help
promote the sale of Israeli
goods, Sher said.

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Sher stated that drastic
economies being instituted
by the Israel government
will result in the closing of
1,000 classrooms in the pub-
lic school system and a per-
cent budget cut for institu-
tions of higher learning;
subsidies to Kupat Holim
for hospital services are
being cut and fees for medi-
cine will be charged. Espe-
cially severe will be the re-
duction in the program for
housing for young couples.

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NEW YORK — The Jor-
danian monarchy is linking
itself to the Syrian regime
of President Hafez al-As-
sad, seeking both short-
term advantages and long-
term guarantees in case a
peace settlement should one
day reshape the political
map of the Middle East.
Joint maritime, phos-
phate and land-transport
companies are being formed
between free-enterprise
Jordan and Socialist Syria.
School books are to be
standardized and university
professors will be ex-
changed.
The two nations will
merge diplomatic represen-
tation in 30 countries to
avoid duplication of expen-
ses, and their press agencies
will pool resources.
One Jordanian official,
recalling unsuccessful
Arab merger efforts, said,
"We have approached
what is possible and we
have left what is impossi-
ble."
New York Times corre-
spondent James Markham
writes that the "impossible"
for the moment is a recon-
ciliation of King Hussein's
absolute monarchy, which
rests on the army, with the
leftists and pan-Arabist
Baathism of Assad's Syria,
which some conservative
Jordanians fear might one
day spill into their country.
The Jordanian leadership
is clearly counting on Syria
to "tame" the leftist fringes
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization. "Maybe Syria
will solve our problems with
the Palestinians," said one
ranking Jordanian, discuss-
ing Syria's disguised inter-
vention in Lebanon.
Some Jordanians hope
that Syria will use its new
influence in Lebanon to sil-
ence left-wing Palestinians
who reject the idea of a ne-
gotiated settlement with
Israel and who look to Iraq,

a

Syria's rival, for support.
Other Jordanians envision
a confederation linking a
Palestinian state on the

West Bank, the Hashemite-
run East Bank, Syria and
Lebanon. Syria is seen as
the bridge to this goal.

Goren-Ford Meeting Focuses
on Israel-Egypt Sinai Accord

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Rabbi Shlomo Goren, the
Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi of
Israel, is in Israel after a
two-week visit to the United
States and an unscheduled
meeting with President
Ford at the White House.
In an address at Shomrai
Emunah Synagogue in Sil-
ver Spring, Md., Goren indi-
cated that the Egyptian-Is-
raeli agreement in the Sinai
was among the topics he dis-
cussed with Ford in their
meeting last week.

CHIEF RABBI GOREN

He said the President felt
that Egypt would not go to
war with Israel again be-
cause it would adversely af-
fect the Egyptian economy
and would result in the im-
mediate closing of the Suez
Canal. Goren also indicated
that Ford believed that Is-
raelis should not feel con-

cerned about the agreement
because it will be successful.
The chief rabbi and Ford
conferred for 20 minutes
during a meeting arranged
by the Israeli Embassy. T
raeli Ambassador Simi.
Dinitz and Gen. Brent
Scowcroft, the President's
special assistant for secu-
rity affairs, were also pre-
sent. Topics included Jewish
questions including the
plight of Soviet and Syrian
Jews.

Sisco Quits State

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Joseph J. Sisco, under secre-
tary of state for political
affairs since early 1974 and
a leading collaborator on the
formulation of American
policy in the Middle East for
more than a decade, is leav-
ing the State Department in
July to become president of
American University in
Washington.
Sisco has been closely
identified with middle east-
ern affairs since 1962 when
he became deputy assistant
secretary of state for inter-
national organizations, the
bureau that is concerned
with the United Nations. In
1969, with the advent of the
Nixon Administration and
when he had completed four
years as assistant secretary
for international organiza-
tions, he became assistant
secretary for near eastern
affairs under Secretary of
State William P. Rogers.

Local View of World Events

B.N•

SOLLVINVI:IG

4 4, •

Jordan Sees Gains in Syrian Ties

-Nre

0

0

C)

"And in my . . . I mean, in THIS corner . . ."

41

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7 II`

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*

TENNIS

* PING.porvG

0 4 * ARTS AND CRAFTS

* SPECIAL EVENTS *
SHUFFLEBOARD *

.

CAMP GAN ISRAEL

14000 WEST NINE MILE ROAD

OAK PARK, MICH. 48237

Phone: 548 2666 • 398.2611

CAMP ADDRESS: 16037 PINE LAKE ROAD LINDEN. MICHIGAN

GIRLS 6 - 16 BOYS 6 - 16 ( NOT CO - ED.)

KOSHER

Former Detroiter Paul
Sills, now living in Davison
near Flint, submitted the
above cartoon to The Jewish
News. A painting contractor
by trade, Sills studied com-
mercial art at Cass Techni-
cal High School.
During slow work periods
he "dabbles" in art and re-
cently submitted a design
which was accepted by the
City of Davison in a compe-

tition for an official city
seal.

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