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February 13, 1976 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

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Fr:day, ,Februar777----Purr777

U .S: Arms Shipments. , Aid Debated Missing Chilean Jewish Official

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Administration sources dis-
closed Tuesday that the U.S.
has agreed to sell Saudi
Arabia $1.2 billion in mod-
ern arms, including M-60
tanks. The tanks reportedly
are the first ever sold to the
Saudis by the U.S.
According to U.S.
sources, the projected arms
deal with the Saudis was
not disclosed to Israeli Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin during
his recent. U.S. visit, and
notification of Congress was
deliberately delayed until
after Rabin's visit.
The Israeli leader was in-
formed of the projected sale
of six C-130 military trans-
ports to Egypt, although a
State Department spokes-
man publicly denied that
projected sale last week.
The Administration
sources indicated that the
sales to Saudi Arabia will
include television-guided
air-to-ground missiles of
the same type supplied to
Israel and armored per-
sonnel carriers as well as
the M-60 tanks. The U.S.
is also planning to sell the
Saudis "Dragon" shoul-
der-held anti-tank mis-
siles, sources reported,
and "Maverick" air-to-
ground missiles.
The $1.2 billion package
includes $900 million in con-
struction contracts, includ-
ing a Saudi naval facility to
be managed by the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers.
The Saudis were report-
edly interested in buying
the new U.S. F-15 fighter
plane but no such proposed
sale is expected to be in-
cluded in the package that
will be officially submitted
to Congress next week.
Administration and State
Department spokesmen re-
fused to comment on re-
ports that the U.S. is also
considering Egyptian re-
quests for "Hawk" missiles,
wire-guided anti-tank weap-
ons, patrol boats and F-15
jet fighters.
The Egyptian requests,
backed by Saudi Arabian
cash, are politically sensi-
tive during this election
year, according to political
observers, and the Adminis-
tration is moving cautiously
on lifting the ban on arms
sales to Egypt.
Sen. Clifford P. Case (R-
NJ) opened Senate debate
last week on the new For-
eign Aid Authorization
Bill by requesting Con-
gress to "put some
shackles" on sales of con-
ventional arms by U.S.
manufacturers.
Amendments in the bill
approved by the Senate For-
eign Relations Committee
are designed, he said, to give
Congress as well as the Ex-
ecutive branch the opportu-
nity to veto or alter pro-
posed military assistance
and commercial sales pro-
jects which could adversely
affect local balances of
power.
At least 15 transactions
worth more than $25 million
each, Case said, were han-
dled by commercial arms
manufacturers and dealers
in 1975. These included a
complete "Hawk" anti-air-

craft missile system for
Saudi Arabia for $266 mil-
lion; C-130 transport planes
to Saudi Arabia for $68 mil-
lion; and helicopters to Is-
rael for $63 million.
A proposed $300 million
"Hawk" missile system for
Jordan is a government, not
a commercial transaction.
Under the amendments,
any transaction worth
more than $25 million
would be channeled
through the U.S. govern-
ment's Foreign Military
Sales Program where, un-
der amendments to the
Nelson-Bingham legisla-
tion passed in 1974, such
sales would be subject to
Congressional review and
possible veto if Congress
disapproved within 30
days.
amendment
Another
sponsored by Sens. Case,
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-
Minn.) and Jacob K. Javits
(R-NY) would terminate
military equipment transac-
tions or training if Ameri-
can citizens are barred from
participating in the projects
because of their race, reli-
gion, sex or national origin.
The White House con-
firmed Wednesday that the
Administration is reviewing
the foreign aid program for
the "transitional quarter"
which involves increased al-
locations for Israel and
some 43 other countries for
military and economic sup-
porting assistance. But Sen.
Humphrey, a key member
of the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee which au-
thorized a 25 percent aid
supplement to cover the
transitional quarter, said "it
is of little importance that
this matter is now under
review."
Humphrey said, 'The Sen-
ate committee has acted and
the full Senate is set to act
next week. Congress author-
izes funds and in this case
the Senate committee acted
after I had discussed the
matter with the Secretary
of State."
Under the Senate For-
eign Relations Commit-
tee's authorization bill,
Israel and some 50 other

countries are to receive an
additional 25 percent in .
recommendations for this
fiscal year because of the
change in the new fiscal
year starting Oct. 1 in-
stead of July 1.
In the case of Israel this
would mean an increase
from $2.25 billion to $2.81
billion, and for Egypt an
increase from approxi-
mately $700 million to $875
million.
Syria's request was cut in
half by the committee be-
cause the Damascus govern-
ment has not shown serious
intention to negotiate issues
in the Arab-Israeli conflict.

* * *

Israel Superiority

WASHINGTON — Col-
umnist James McCartney
reported 'Wednesday that a
new study of the balance of
power in the Middle East
shows Israel has military
superiority over the Arabs
because of the quality of her
armed forces.
Despite being outnum-
bered two to one in military
manpower, the report by
Dale Tahtinen of the Ameri-
can Enterprise Institute'
said Israel has a clear supe-
riority in the air, and also
holds the edge in missiles,
electronic countermeasures
and at sea.
Tahtinen also warned
that the weapons buildup in
the Middle East has not
created stability as claimed
by the Ford Administration.

* * *

Missile Shown

TEL AVIV (JTA) — The
American surface-to-sur-
face "Lance" missile has
been incorporated into Is-
rael's artillery corps.
Defense Minister Shimon
Peres and senior army offi-
cers visited an artillery
corps base and watched sol-
diers training with the
100-kilometer range missile.
The Lance, which is
mounted on a launcher, is
the American answer to the
Russian "Frog" missile
which was used by the Syri-
ans and Egyptians during
the Yom Kippur War.

Friedman Named Assistant to Ford

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Friedman will continue to
Milton Friedman, a senior write Presidential speeches
speech writer and deputy and edit materials submit-
editor on President Ford's ted by other staffers but he
staff, was promoted last will hold a higher station in
week by the President to be the White House personnel
a special assistant, the structure.
White House has disclosed.

`Citizen Goldfarb:' Man's

"Citizen Goldfarb," the
autobiography and philoso-
phy of a fanatical democrat,
is the way Sam Goldfarb de-
scribes his volume about
himself and his ideas, which
is published by Operation
Truth, Inc.
Citizen Goldfarb is the
story of a self-made man;
not necessarily the classic
rags-to-riches tale, but a
story of a man who believes
in himself, his country and
(not facetiously) apple pie
and motherhood.
From gaining and losing
fortunes, living the Ameri-
can Dream, spouting demo-
cratic ideas and being a
staunch supporter of Israel,

Sam Goldfrab leads his
reader through his some-
times-zany life.
On the way he manages
to relate anecdotes of
American history in short,
one and two-page chap-
ters. Goldfarb offers ad-
vice on child-raising, elec-
tioneering, democracy and
clean living among a mul-
titude of other topics.
In his conclusion he
states:
"I learned that one cannot
live by bread alone — that
after achieving reasonable
security for one's family,
one should dedicate oneself
to the service of others.

Was Abducted, Embassy Says

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
A Chilean Embassy official
has claimed that David Sil-
berman was abducted by
unknown persons from a
jail in Antofagasta in north-
ern Chile and that the Chi-
lean government is cooper-
ating with the human rights
commission of the Organi-
zation of American States
(OAS) in an investigation of
his disappearance 18
months ago.
Rafael Otero, counsellor
at the embassy, made that
statement to an inquiry as
to the fate of the 35-year-old
Chilean-Jewish mining en-
gineer. Silberman served in
the regime of the late Presi-
dent Salvador Allende and
was sentenced by the Chi-
lean military junta to 13
years' imprisonment for al-
leged treason after Allende
was deposed in the 1974
coup.
Ot.ero's statement was
believed to have been the
first to mention abduction
in the case in which the Chi-
lean government has pro-
vided virtually no informa-
tion despite persistent
inquiries from Silberman's
father and sister who live in

Israel. His wife and three
children remained in Chile.
The embassy official
said that "the government
began an investigation
and found no evidence
where he (Silberman) is
and what happened."
He said the human rights
commission of the OAS was
conducting its own investi-
gation "with the cooperation
of the Chilean government"
and that the Chilean Minis-
ter of Justice, Miguel
Schweitzer, was "making a
personal investigation."
Otero volunteered the infor-
mation that Schweitzer is
Jewish.
Silberman was deputy
minister for mines in the
Allende administration and
was general manager of the
Cobre Chuque copper mines
in Antofogasta. The mines,
once operated by the Ameri-
can Anaconda Copper Co.,
were nationalized by the
Allende regime.
Otero said he was
"guessing" that "some peo-
ple intended to get him out
of the country" and they
could be "a terrorist group
from the left or the right.
Really, we don't know what

Guatemala Gets Israel Aid

TEL AVIV (JTA) — An
Israel Aircraft Industry
Boeing 707 took off for Gua-
temala Wednesday with a
load of medical supplies,
food and other emergency
equipment for the victims of
the earthquakes in that
Central American country.
The supplies being
shipped were donated by the
Israel Defense Ministry, the
Red Magen David, the Ro-
tary Club, the Lions, Bnai
Brith and other organiza-
tions in Israel. The collec-
tion of supplies is being
coordinated by Mordechai
Allon, the honorary Guate-
malan consul in Israel.
The 707 also is carrying
a letter expressing Israel's
sorrow over the tragedy in
Guatemala from Defense
Minister Shimon Peres.
Knesset Speaker Yisrael
Yeshayahu cabled a mes-
sage cf condolence to his
counterpart in Guatemala.
Wednesday's shipment
was the second. An earlier
shipment took plasma and
other medical supplies.
A special committee is

66

working on a concert to be
held in Jerusalem under the
patronage of President
Ephraim Katzir, the pro-
ceeds of which will go for
aid to Guatemala.
No deaths were reported
among the country's 2,000
Jews.

Israel to Open
Tennis Center

$8.2 Million Raised
at Rabin Dinner

LOS ANGELES (JTA) —
More than 1,700 people
jammed the Beverly Hilton
Hotel Feb. 4 to hear Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin and to
pledge $8.2 million toward
the United Jewish Welfare
Fund goal of $35 million at
UJWF's inaugural dinner.
Rabin told the huge
group, believed to be one of
the largest audiences of his
U.S. visit, that he had found
on the part of both Jews and
non-Jews "a solid basis of
communication and under-
standing and of special rela-
tions between the largest
democracy and the only de-
mocracy that exists in the
Middle East.

View of True Democracy"

"Education is a never end-
ing process. Formal educa-
tion is only the foundation
for study and learning that
should continue throughout
one's life. . .
"I am proud to have
coined the slogan, 'Do busi-
ness on Monday in the spirit
of Sunday. I hope that it be-
comes widely used.
"Living in a world and in
an age where freedom and
security are threatened it
behooves us fortunate
Americans to consecrate
our lives to the strengthen-
ing of our democracy."
.."Citizen Goldfarb" is
dedicated to Thomas

happened. He simply disap-
peared," Otero said.
He claimed that Silber-
man was tried for treason
because he "gave secret
processes" to engineers in
a Soviet commission that
was inspecting production
at the Cobre Chuque
mines. Otero also alleged
that Silberman was "a top
executive" of the Chilean
Communist Party.
Silberman's father and,.
sister have sought assist('
ance from the International--
Red Cross, American legis-
lators and various world
personages to determine his
whereabouts or confirm
whether he is dead or alive.
They have pointed out
that of the many Chilean
political prisoners who dis-
appeared when the military
regime took over that coun-
try, Silberman was the only
one who vanished after he
was tried and sentenced.
Chief Rabbi Angel Krei-
man of Chile, who has
pressed inquiries on behalf
of the Silberman family,
was reportedly ordered by
President Augusto Pinochet
last year to stop asking
questions about Silberman.

Paine, "the inspiration for
my obsession to democ-
racy," and to Sam Gold-
farb's mother and to his
wife.
He describes the book as
"A remarkable saga of one
born in Russia, reared in the
slums of St. Louis and who
acquired the means to be of
service to his fellow men."
Sam Goldfarb also states
on the cover: "You will enjoy
this book because 'God dic-
tated it and all I did was
push the pencil.' "
Reader, beware of a fast-
talking man who would con-
vert you to democracy.
—A.H.

President Ephraim Katzir
is shown practicing on one of
the 13 all-weather courts in
the Israel Tennis Center.

* * *
TEL AVIV — The $3 mil-
lion Israel Tennis Center at
Ramat Hasharon will open
in late April for the annual
Passover international tour-
nament.
A total of 13 all-weather
courts will be ready for use,
including one with seats for
up to 1,500 spectators. Ac-
cording to plans, the center
will feature a club house
and dormitory for pl s
being coached.
e
The center also will
special facilities for handi-
capped persons who wish to-
play tennis, as well as spe-
cial spectator seating for the
disabled.
Meanwhile, more than
$900,000 has been secured in
pledges toward a minimum
goal of $1.5 million in 1975
for the Israel Tennis Center
of the United States Com-
mittee Sports for Israel.

I am a Jew because in all
places where there are tears
and suffering the Jew
weeps.

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