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October 31, 1975 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

20 October 31, 1975

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Jewish Ethics in the Business World

(Continued from Page 18)

tageous, not only whether it
is legal, but whether, in the
light of his faith, it is right
and good.
Judaism has never re-
garded wealth as an evil or
denied that wealth and righ-
teousness can consort to-
gether. In rabbinic thought
wealth is a blessing and pov-
erty an evil. But wealth in
itself bestowed no virtue;
and the rabbis of old would
never have condoned that
single-minded concentra-
tion on the acquisition of
wealth which is so much in
evidence today, or that
preoccupation with material

3

" . -
42

.

possessions, with standards
of living as the touchstone of
well-being.

"Success in both coun-
tries is measure in money
and possessions," wrote a
journalist recently when
comparing America with
Russia. I do not think that
the Anglo-Jewish commu-
nity are far behind in this
respect.

This materialism is ag-
gravated by that respect for
wealth which is an unfor-
tunate feature of our com-
munity today.
In former times it was
our boast that piety and
learning were the Jew's

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Africans React
to Arab Ties

NEW YORK — Sadawy
Iyari, the president of the
Inter-Arab Bank for Afri-
can Development, set up by
the Arab League following
the oil price rises of 1973,
said the bank will not ex-
tend aid to any African
country that renews its dip-
lomatic relations with Is-
rael.
But Kenyan Attorney-
General Charles Njonjo told
his nation's Parliament in
Nairobi that Kenya should
consider cutting off its char-
coal exports to the Arab
world, where it is the basic
cooking fuel.
"The Arabs," he said, "are
milking the people in devel-
oping countries, yet we send
them charcoal at the ex-
pense of converting our
country into a desert — a
desert without oil."
Tanzanian Minister of
Commerce and Industry
Amir Jemal said that the
"OPEC countries have
turned their backs on the
developing countries, espe-
cially the less developed. For
the less developed states, oil
products are no luxury, they
are vital commodities."

ROLEX


110..

claim to distinction; now
wealth dominates. I know
that there are good reasons
for this. But the results are
nevertheless unfortunate. It
makes wealth desirable, not
only to surround oneself
with comfort and luxury,
but also to enhance one's
status and influence in the
community.
We need not extol the du-
bious virtues of poverty.
But Judaism teaches that
possessions, and life itself,
were given to men in trust.
If we make the pursuit of
wealth our one aim in life,
then we ask for ourselves a
disproportionate share of
the goods which are in trust
to man for the good of all
mankind; and if in that pur-
suit we are heedless of the
rights and interests and
happiness of our fellows,
then we are faithless to the
trust with which we have
been charged.

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Opening A New Town

Lost Czech Torah,
Rabbi 'Reunited'

NEW YORK — A
200-year-old Torah scroll
lost since the Holocaust,
and a Czechoslovak rabbi
uprooted during the Nazi oc-
cupation, were reunited in a
reconsecration ceremony
this month at Temple Israel
of West Brighton, Staten
Island.

The Torah, one of 1,564
scrolls desecrated during
the Nazi occupation of
Czechoslovakia and lost for
nearly 25 years, was res-
cued, stored away and al-
most forgotten. Discovered
several years ago, it was
sent to London where it was
refurbished.

Israel Housing Minister Avraham Ofer is shown in
a Jerusalem Post photograph throwing the switches
connecting the new town of Yamit into Israel's national
electrical power system. Russian and American olim,
and many Israeli families waited up to two years to be
selected in a lottery for the first 200 hundred homes in
Yamit. The town has a large industrial site, and work
will begin soon on an additional 1,000 apartments.

Plan to Build Mikva in NY
Stirs Dispute Among Jews

TEANECK, NJ — The
determination of an Ortho-
dox synagogue to install a
mikva so that its married
-vvomen can perform an an-
cient ceremony of purifica-
tion threatens to divide
Jews in this suburban com-
munity.
The controversy over the
ritual bath was seen by
community leaders here as
underscoring a growing con-
cern that a surprisingly
heavy influx of Orthodox
families_ jeopardizes this
township's prized but frag-
ile social and racial homo-
geneity.
According to the New

RIETS Seminars
Reach 3,500 Youth

NEW YORK — The To-
rah leadership seminar se-
ries, sponsored by Rabbi
Isaac Elchanan Theological
Seminary (RIETS), a Yesh-
iva University affiliate,
sponsored six programs this
summer in five countries —
South Africa, Australia,
New Zealand, Canada, and
the United States — aimed
at both observant and unaf-
filiated youth, offering
them an explanation of the
foundations and philosophic
bases of traditional Juda-
ism.
The week-long programs
by 130 Jewish youth leaders
consisted of discussions,
both formal and informal,
on a number of cultural and
Judaic topics; instruction in
historical and spiritual
themes; and guidance and
development in a total Jew-
ish environment.
More than 3,500 youth
attended the programs.

Iraq Says Syria
Tortures Arabs

NEW YORK — The Iraqi
News Agency said nearly
500 Palestinians are tor-
tured in a Syrian jail, as
well as 450 Syrian officers
of middle and upper ranks.

Rabbi Milton J. Rosenfeld
of the temple thought it pro-
per for a Czech rabbi to
carry the scroll in the recon-
secration ceremony. With
the aid of the Society for the
History of Czechoslovak
Jews, Inc., Rabbi Hugo'
Stransky was located. He is
a one-time spiritual leader
of the Nachod synagogue,
from which the Torah came,
and had been serving Cong.
Beth Hillel in Manhattan
for the past 20 years.

York Times, another fear
expressed by non-Orthodox
Jews is that Orthodox fami-
lies will re-create the same
kind of Jewish ghetto here
that many Jews from older
sections of of New York City
moved here to escape.

Nov. 16
5075 W. Maple Rd.,

Rabbi Macy Gordon,
spiritual leader of Cong.
Bnai Yeshurun, the syn-
agogue that is the center of
the controversy, said that
Orthodox Jews are a
source of psychological
guilt for some non-Ortho-
dox Jews who have moved
to the suburbs.

GRAEME
FLOWERS

Beth Abraham—Hillel
Sisterhood Bazaar

W.
Bloomfield

BILL CAPLAN

12711 W. 7 MILE RD.

The rabbi pointed out
that many Jews have no de-
sire to be equated with the
stereotyped version of the
bearded, Old World Jew
that they believe Orthodox
Judaism tends to portray.

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