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October 24, 1975 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

October 24, 1975 29

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS



DIMITRI'S
316 N. WOODWARD

2 BLKS N. OF 11 MILE
542-4880
Specials

ROYAL OAK

LUNCHEON

SUPER BREAKFAST

GOURMET
DINNERS
NITELY
$ 1 95 .$5 00

inc: soup & coffee
different Item
each day 11-2

7 a.m.-12 Noon

$1 95

$ 1

Plus Others All Day

YOUR BUCK
BUYS MORE
Al STEAK G 4

Jerusalem Orchestra to Debut
in Concert at Shaarey Zedek

® BEEF
■ BURGERS
II CHICKEN
III FISH FRY

95

We Specialize in Home Cooking

' Open Daily
11 AM-9 PM

COMPLETE FAMILY DINING
FOR EVERYBODY

• Low Prices

• No Tipping

The Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, with Lukas Foss as chief conductor-adviser,
will make its Detroit debut Nov. 22 at Cong. Shaarey Zedek. Begun 35 years ago, the
orchestra functioned mainly as the major broadcasting and recording chamber ensem-
ble of the Israel Broadcasting Authority. Under the guidance of Foss, the ensemble
was enlarged into the full symphony orchestra which is making its first American and
Canadian coast-to-coast concert tour. Tickets are available for reserved sections, and
at a reduced rate for general admission. For tickets, call the synagogue 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
daily or 9 a.m.-noon Sundays, 357-5544.

All-You
Can-Eat Salad Bar
Carry-Outs Available

MIiAM[NIW

from $1.00
from $3.75

LUNCHEONS
DINNERS

_OPEN MON.-SAT. 11 a.m. TO 2 a.m.
SUNDAY 1 p.m. TO 2 a.m.
NORTHWESTERN HGWY. AT 12 MILE & FRANKLIN
IN FRANKLIN SHOPPING PLAZA

Conference Finds Mourning
Can Serve Beneficial Purpose

357-3280

NEW YORK — Mourn-
ing, a time of confusion and
pain for most people, ac-
tually serves as a means of
working through the crises
of meaning, crises of faith,
and crises of personal ident-
ity that arise from the death
of a loved one, according to
experts gathered at New
York's Yeshiva University
for the school's second an-
nual conference on bereave-
ment and grief.

Most Chinese restaurants
offer only one style of cooking.
We specialize in three.

Mandarin•Cantonese•zechuen

New York Style Chinese

BUFFET

i t TUES. AND THURS. 5-9 PM

-

-

ALL YOU CAN EAT

, 44.14w,
5 5.80

Three Happy Hours:
Cocktails served for
HALF-PRICE on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday
from 4-7 pm

14MvDSCTues.gEThurs.11 am 10 pm

-

41563
WEST TEN
MILE
NOVI

349-92

Fri. & Sat. 11 am-midnight
Sunday — noon to 10 pm
Luncheon —11 am-3 pm
Closed Mondays.

THE NEW

EMBERS

DELI & RESTAURANT

OPENING THIS MONDAY
OCT. 27, 1975

at

3598 W. MAPLE AT LAHSER

IN THE VILLAGE KNOLL SHOPPING CENTER

NEXT TO A & P

645-1033

Featuring

Home-Style Cooking

OPEN 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., SUN. THRU THURS.
7 a.m. to 12 Mid., FRI. & SAT.

• Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
and
A COMPLETE LINE OF
CARRY-OUT PRODUCTS





TRAY CATERING ORDERS •
NOW BEING TAKEN


CHICKEN, DELI AND DAIRY TRAYS



OBEEF
OBURGERS
OCHICKEN OFISH FRY



The conference, co-spon-
sored by the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America, Inc.,
brought together more than
500 clergy, educators, fu-
neral directors, profession-
als in allied health fields,
students, and others in all
day sessions of major ad-
dresses and workshops ex-
ploring the sociological,
psychological, and spiritual
impact of bereavement and
grief on all members of the
family.
The topic of death and
loss, a once taboo subject
that has, in recent years,
gained attention as profes-
sionals begin to examine
ways to integrate the con-

cept of death into everyday
life, drew participants from
as far away as California. Il-
linois, Florida, and Ver-
mont.
Rabbi Maurice Lamm,
spiritual leader of Beth
Jacob Congregation in
Beverly Hills, Calif., ad-
dressed himself to the
question of the spiritual
impact of bereavement.
The rabbi, author of "The
Jewish Way in Death and
Mourning," stressed the
important beneficial as-
pects of the traditional
Jewish mourning.
The first and dominant
reaction of one who just lost
a loved one, he said, is to ask
why, and to feel that God is
unjust.
The injunctions for re-
peating the Kadish, the
Jewish prayer of mourning,
however, cause the bereaved
to echo the phrase "God is
just" over and over through-
out the mourning period.
The prayer also contains
frequent mention of the
concepts of life and peace,
speaking to the living about
life, and helping to bring the
mourner back to normalcy.

Seminary, Columbia U. Join
for Rabbinic-Social Work Plan

NEW YORK — A new
dimension in the education
of the clergy is envisioned in
a program announced by
The Jewish Theological
Seminary of America in
cooperation with the Colum-
bia University School of
Social Work. Both Dr.
Mitchell Ginsberg, dean of
the social work school, and
Dr. Gerson D. Cohen, chan-
cellor of the seminary, see"
in the new venture the pos-
sibility of better delivery of
vital social seryices, and bet-
ter cooperation between the
clergyman and the social
agencies.
The plan, which calls for
an interchange of students,
courses, and credits be-
tween the two schools, was
stimulated and expedited by

Mrs. Martha K. Selig, con-
sultant on health and wel-
fare services, who is close- to
both institutions.
Dr. Neil Gillman, dean of
academic affairs at the
Seminary and Dr. Irving
Miller, professor of Social
Work at the school, will
serve as coordinators of the
program. •
Other benefits of the
program for the seminary,
according to Rabbi Gill-
man, will include the oppor-
tunity for rabbis now serv-
ing in congregations to come
back for refresher courses
to increase their competence
in this aspect of the clergy-
man's job. These courses
will be available to them ei-
ther at the seminary or at
Columbia.

25025 Telegraph Rd.

at 10 Mile Rd., Southfield

1050 Ann Arbor Rd.

(at Harvey St.) 2 Blks.
E. of Sheldon Rd., Plymouth

NEW DINNER IDEAS FROM THE
GOLDEN MUSHROOM

Tenderloin Ns On a Skewer

Broiled cherry tomatoes, onions
& green peppers. Served with rice

Combined With Our Exciting Salad Bar
This Makes An Enjoyable Dinner

zz

4 tivA00--

18100 W. 10 Mile Rd., cor. Southfield Rd. 559-4230

Lunch, Mon.-Fri., 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Dinner, Mon.-Fri., 5 p.m.-11 p.m.
Dinner, Saturday, 5:30 p.m.-12 Mid.

Late Evening Menu Available

el

MONDAY & TUESDAY

SPECIAL!

ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPAGHETTI

99

WITH OUR 5 GREAT $
GOURMET SAUCES,
CRISP COLD SALAD,
CHOICE OF DRESSING &
HOT GARLIC BREAD

CHILDREN 10 & UNDER $1.19

MAMA FEATURES HOT GARLIC BREAD
2nd COFFEE, TEA OR POP ON THE HOUSE

MAMA FEATURES ITALIAN-AMERICAN FOOD

DON'T FORGET TO RESERVE YOUR HOLIDAY
PARTIES IN MAMA'S PRIVATE ROOM.

A

-

C,

r tt+iVirio eon- Piro-9r* s ID ,
r • • e Wit C • ii". eir'

a -'

Nt,
.,,
, 4 A LILL 11A7

g

• a ',AAA

• e,e • el 0 k +1 • • • a

29269 SOUTHFIELD

(In The Farrell's Shopping tenter)

559-8717

• •

HOURS

MON.-THURS., 11 TO 9
FRI. 'TIL 10, SAT. 12 NOON-10
SUNDAY 1 TO 9

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