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October 17, 1975 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r

October 17, 1975 35

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

I

Jewry on the Air

Ever-y participant in a
survey of a representative
group of Conservative rab-
bis reported they experi-
enced "many areas of great
fulfillment" in the rabbi-
nate but many also reported
they suffered from rabbinic
isolation.

ative Judaism, the scholarly
quarterly published by the
Rabbinical Assembly, the
association of Conservative
rabbis and the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary, the Con-
servative school.
The publication sent a
10-point questionnaire to
more than 60 rabbis — all
ordained since 1967 — and
28 replied.

The findings were re-
ported by Rabbi Stephen
C. Lerner, editor of Conserv-

Rabbi Lerner said the
picture which emerged
from the "collective self-
portrait" was one of

By BEN GALLOB

(Copyright 1975, JTA, Inc.)

This Week's Radio and
Television Programs

VISTAS OF ISRAEL

Time: 6:30 a.m. Sunday.
Station: WOMC - FM
(104.3)
Feature: Israel culture
and literature. A calendar
of events in the Jewish com-
munity follows.
* * *

MESSAGE OF ISRAEL

Time: 6:35 a.m. Sunday.
Station: WXYZ (1270).
and
Time: 10:45 p.m. Sunday.
Station: WDEE (1500).
Feature: An address to
the Jewish community.

* * *

RELIGION IN THE
NEWS

Time: 9:05 a.m. Sunday.
Station: CKWW

*

* *

HIGHLIGHTS

Time: 9:45 a.m. Sunday
Station: Channel 2
Feature: Prof. Arie Vardi,
pianist and director of the
Rubin Academy of Music in
Tel Aviv, Israel, will per-
form and discuss music in
Israel. Felix Resnick, who
will conduct the Detroit
Symphony Orchestra in the
annual Balfour Concert of
the Zionist Organization of
Detroit, also will be inter-
viewed.

*

* *

ETERNAL LIGHT

Time: 10:30 p.m. Sunday
Station: WWJ
Feature: Part Three of the
"Jews in Colonial America"
series.

*

* *

WJR's Karl Haas
at Carnegie Hall

LUBAVITCH
JEWISH HOUR

Time: 10:30_p.m. Sunday.
Station: WNIC (1300) and
WNIC-FM (100).
Feature: Rabbinical re-
marks, Jewish music.
* * *

INTERVIEW
IMPROMPTU

Time: 11 p.m. Sunday.
Station: WDEE (1500).
and
Time: 12:15 p.m. Wednes-
day.
Station: WQRS - FM,
(105.1).
Feature: A notable in the
Jewish community will be
interviewed.
* * *

RELIGIOUS SCOPE

Time: 11:30 p.m. Sunday.
Station: Channel 9.
Feature: News in the Jew-
ish commurlitv4

ROZHINKES
MIT MANDLEN

Time: 9 a.m. Monday,
Tuesday and Thursday.
Station: WIID (1090).
Feature: Israeli and Yid-
dish music, news, inter-
views, recipes and other fea-
tures. Short talks will be
presented by rabbis from
the Detroit Jewish commu-
nity. A Jewish News staffer
will give a brief report.
* * *

"IF NOT NOW . . ."

Time: 7 p.m. Tuesday
Station:
WDET-FM
(101.9)
Feature: An interview
with a notable in the Jewish
community.
*

YIDDISHE SHTUNDE

Time: 9 a.m. Wednesday.
Station: WIID (1090).
Feature: Yiddish lan-
guage program of music and
interviews.
and
Time: 9 a.m. Friday
Feature: Yiddish with Al
Naftal and Sonia Popowski.

Envoy Toon Gets
Jerusalem Home

KARL HAAS

Karl Haas, originator of
Radio Station WJR's award-
winning "Adventures in
Good Music" series which is
heard on 30 U.S. stations
and the Armed Forces net-
work, has been signed to do
five special two-hour pro-
grams entitled "Adventures
in Good Music" in New
York's Carnegie Hall.
The monthly programs
will begin in November with
Haas playing piano, doing
commentary, and conduct-
ing an orchestra. Haas, who
has been with WJR for 17
years, now divides his time
between Detroit and New
York.
In addition to activities
with the Detroit and Miami
symphonies, Haas also
works with "Festival at Sea"
cruises twice a year, a pub-
lic television project in
Pittsburgh, and other pro-
grams.

WASHINGTON — The
State Department agreed
in principle to allow the U.S.
Embassy in Tel Aviv to
rent an apartment in Jeru-
salem so that Ambassador
Malcolm Toon will have a
place to stay overnight dur-
ing his regular visits to the
Israeli capital.
Although Jerusalem is
Israel's capital, the U.S. and
several other Western coun-
tries maintain their embas-
sies in Tel Aviv because of
Jerusalem's sensitive status.
The U.S. supported the
1947 UN partition plan call-
ing on Jerusaelm to be in-
ternationalized, and since
then there has not been an
official change in U.S. pol-
icy.
Toon has a residence in
Herzlyia, and the long trip
to Jerusalem was becoming
tiresome, the sources said.
State Department offi-
cials said that there is a pos-
sibility that the U.S. Em-
bassy in Tel Aviv will take
an apartment in Jerusalem
for the use of "embassy per-
sonnel."

HUSBAND
WANTED

Conservative Rabbis Report 'Great Fulfillment'

U.S. Urged to Halt Lebanon Fight

NEW YORK — President
Ford was urged by the head
of the Zionist Organization
of America last week "to un-
dertake all possible diplo-
matic measures to halt the
Pan-Arab Islamic aggres-
sion against Lebanon, and
particularly the Arab-Mos-
lem attack against the
Christians in Lebanon."
Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein,
president of the ZOA,
termed the attack on Leba-
non's Christians a manifes-
tation of "inherent Arab in-
tolerance against other
faiths, minorities and
races," and a "serious threat
to peace in the Middle
East."

In a telegram to the
White House, Dr. Stern-
stein told the President
that "all evidence points
to involvement of outside
Arab states such as Syria,
Libya and others in arm-
ing, encouraging and as-
sisting the attackers

Federation Probes
NY Jewish Issues

NEW YORK (JTA) — A
series of conferences will be
sponsored this year on is-
sues of Jewish population,
pre-marital counseling,
Jewish singles, the single-
parent family and alcohol-
ism by the commission on
synagogue relations of the
Federation of Jewish Phi-
lanthropies.
Rabbi Isaac N. Trainin,
director of the commission,
said in announcing the con-
ferences, that a meeting on
the relationship of the rabbi
to the Jewish social worker
would focus on resettlement
of Soviet Jews in the New
York Jewish community,
and that the changing inner
structure of the Jewish com-
munity would be discussed
at a conference on the rela-
tionship of the Jewish Y to
religious institutions.
He said that in addition to
the Jewish Singles Newslet-
ter, published by the com-
mission, which now reaches
about 3,000 subscribers, a
guide on programming for
Jewish singles will be pub-
lished soon.
He also reported that the
commission was assisting in
the coordination of free and
comprehensive Federation
Employment and Guidance
Service vocational pro-
grams, available to syn-
agogue members, and that
plans are being considered
to utilize federation camps
for special weekends for
Jewish families and singles.

against the Christians in
Lebanon."

"The crushing of the
Christian position in Leba-
non is bound to be a prelude
to war against Israel," the
ZOA leader stated.
Dr. Sternstein made
known at the same time
that he has called on the Na-
tional Council of Churches
to join with the ZOA in
mobilizing public opinion
and arousing both houses of
Congress to the "dangerous
developments in Lebanon."

Hebrew U. Friends
Honor 2 Doctors

NEW YORK — Dr. How-
ard A. Rusk and Dr. Walter
A.L. Thompson will each
receive the Torch of Learn-
ing Award of the American
Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
versity at the annual Medi-
cal Division Dinner Tues-
day.
Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-
Ariz.) will be the guest
speaker.
Dr. Rusk, chairman of the
Department of Rehabilita-
tion Medicine and director
of the Rusk Institute of Re-
habilitation Medicine at
New York University Medi-
cal Center, has advised over
48 nations on rehabilitation
services while working on
behalf of the United Nations
and other international or-
ganizations. He is contribut-
ing editor to the New York
Times and Medical World
News.
Dr. Thompson, chairman
of the Department of Ortho-
paedic Surgery at New York
University Medical Center,
has assisted in the rehabili-
tation of wounded soldiers
in Israel since the Yom Kip-
pur War, and, as a consult-
ant to the Israel Ministry of
Defense, is helping the gov-
ernment to develop its pro-
grams in orthopaedic reha-
bilitation.

Murdered Jewish
Olympian Cited

CLEVELAND (JTA) —
Senator Hubert H. Hum-
phrey (D-Minn.) and Israel
Supreme Court Justice
Haim Cohen joined 800
Clevelanders in a memorial
ceremony for Cleveland-
born David Berger, one of 11
memberS of the Israeli
Olympic team murdered by
Arab terrorists at. Munich
on Sept. 5, 1972.
An original sculpture by
David Davis depicting the
tragedy was dedicated Oct.
5 in memory of Berger who
was 28 at the time of his
death.

"committed and con-
cerned men finding satis-
faction in certain (gener-
ally the same) areas and
unhappy in others; of men,
who, despite the vaunted
diversity of Conservative
Judaism, do share certain
approaches to such issues
as Jewish law and Jewish
tradition; of men who are
at once more traditionally
observant and more exper-
imental, more liberal than
their congregants."

TO TAKE HIS MATE

WINING AND
DINING AT. . . .

David Ganus' Delightful

Hungarian Village

SANYIKA'S FAMOUS GYPSIES
SERENADE HER

Blk. N. of
1-75
(S'fld. to 1-75 N. to Springwells)
843-5611
Major Credit Card Accepted.

1001-Springwells — 1

He also reported that "a
significant number" of the
28 rabbis declared they had
become "more liberal both
in attitude and in pattern of
observance as a result of
their contact with their con-
gregants over a period of
years."

UNCLE

MILTIE'S

Deli-Restaurant

2516 W. 14 MILE

Between Coolidge

VINCENZO'S

& Crooks

Royal Oak

Italian-American Cuisine

649-9764

18211 JOHN R

• Breakfast
• Lunch
• Dinner
• Carry-Out
• Tray Catering

Bet 6 & 7 Mile Rds

869-5674

**************
*-

DINE 8 DANCE*

EVERY NIGHT t
a,
James Cohen

SUNDAY
BRUNCH

Mon. & Tues.

c?aula & Allen Street

Wed.-Sat.

tc,

* a

*

* *-

7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Eggs, Assorted Rolls,
Vegetables, Cheeses,
Choice of Lox, Smoked
Fish or Sable, Beverage.

ANGEL 'Si

1 ,HOUR

GLASS

18800 W. McNICHOLS*
1 (6 Blks. W. of Southfield)
538-4850
*

$2.89
$1.50

Adults
Children

*****.m.********_

DIMITRI'S

316 N. WOODWARD 2 BLKS N. OF 11 MILE

ROYAL OAK

542-4880

Specials

GOURMET
DINNERS
NITELY
95 .$500
$ 1

LUNCHEON

SUPER BREAKFAST

7 a.m.-12 Noon

$1 95

inc. soup & coffee
different Item
each day 11-2
$ 1 95

Plus Others All Day

We Specialize in Home Cooking

Earle Mostyn's

NOSHERIE

26052 GREENFIELD (Lincoln Shopping Center)

Oak Park 968-8666

CORNED BEEF

NO
LIMIT

$3 50

lb.

HOME-MADE

JEWISH-STYLE

HORS 'OEVRES

Brought To You In Chat- s

ing Dishes 8. Complete

Set-Up For All Occasions

Lean $1.50 Extra

50 pers. min.

q 75

1,

HOURS: 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mon. Thru Thurs., 6 a.m.
to 1 a.m. Fri., 6 a.m. to 2 a.m. Sat., 7 a.m. to 12 Mid. Sun.

per
pers.

c Norm Keiriarte's

squire's Oable

1403 S. COMMERCE (near the intersection

Reservations Suggested

at Maple 15 8 Pontiac Trail)

624-6660
WED. & THURS., 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.

COMPLETE DINNERS FOR TWO

INCLUDES: SALAD BAR, SOUP OR JUICE, HOME-MADE BREAD,
ROLLS & BAGELS AND COFFEE, TEA OR MILK
Choice Of

$7 9 5

• CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS
• BREADED PERCH
• BROILED
Choice of
• BEEF ALA & 1
CHOPPED SIRLOIN

Choice of smothered in onions or

mushroom & bordelatse sauce

9 5

.DEUTSCH
• VEAL
SCALLOPINI

77„

;,!!-

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