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August 22, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-08-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8 Friday, August 22, 1975

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Judge's Illness Postpones Trial of Soviet Jew

NEW YORK (JTA) — The
trial of Jewish activist Lev
Roitburd from Odessa
which was scheduled to
open Aug. 15, was post-
poned because "the judge is
sick," the National Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry re-
ported.
The trial of Anatoly
Malkin, a 21-year-old Jew-
ish activist from Kiev, was
scheduled for Monday. He is
being charged with "draft
evasion" and if convicted
faces up to three years in
prison.

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The NCSJ also reported
that the parents of Anna
Gurevich, who is already in
Israel, were granted exit vi-
sas and were scheduled to
leave the Soviet Union on
last Wednesday. Anna's
husband, Uri Vudka, is still
in prison in the Soviet
Union.

Roitburd was charged
with "resisting arrest"
last July. He started out
for Moscow where he ap-
parently planned to con-
sult doctors regarding sur-
gery for his son but was
stopped by six men in civil-
ian clothes and taken into
custody.

The prosecutor claimed
that Roitburd struck one of
them and resisted arrest.
His scheduled trip to Mos-
cow coincided with the visit
of a U.S. Senatorial delega-

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son of Prof. Feival Silnitsky
of Krasnodor University, is
also expected to be tried
"any minute" on the same
charges as Malkin. Last
week Yacov Vinarov, 21, of
Kiev was sentenced by the
city court to three years in
jail for "draft evasion" after
he was refused permission
last March to emigrate to
Israel.

According to the NCSJ,
other young Soviet Jewish
refusniks now threatened
with punitive conscription
for their emigration-re-
lated activities are: Si-
meon Pevsner (Moscow),
Leonid Levit (Tiraspol),
Leonid Greenshtein
(Odessa), Yuri Yukhana-
nov and Valery Safanov
(Derbent), Zakhar Bra-
ginsky (Dneprepetrovsk),
and Boris Levitas (Kiev).

It also was reported that
Isaac Gilyutin, a 36-year-old
cybernetist from Leningrad,
was detained last week by
the Soviet authorities just
as he, his wife, and daugh-
ter were about to board a
plane on their way to Israel.
Mark Levitt, a 22-year-old
medical student from Phila-
delphia, who has just re-
turned from a visit to the
Soviet Union_said he was a
witness to the incident in
the Leningrad airport.
According to Levitt, the
customs officers at Lenin-
grad's airport checked Gil-
yutin's luggage and found a
number of personal paint-
ings that the Gilyutins in-
tended to take with them to
Israel. Levitt said that Gil-
yutin offered to pay 50 ru-
bles fine for not declaring
the paintings, but the air-
port authorities refused to

accept it and instead de-
tained him on charges of
"art smuggling."

Gilyutin, Levitt said, is
now awaiting a trial in
which he expects to be
sentenced to three years in
prison. His wife and child
are staying with relatives
in Leningrad since they
sold their apartment and
belongings before their
aborted trip to Israel.

In New York about 400
people met on the steps of
the public library on Fifth
Avenue and 42nd Street in
mid-town Manhattan last
week to commemorate the
23rd anniversary of the exe-
cution of 24 Jewish poets
and writers in the Lubianka
prison in Moscow during the
Stalinist regime.
The event here was spon-
sored by the Greater New
York Conference on Soviet
Jewry. Similar events were
held in other parts of this
country, Canada and Eng-
land.
In Boston, representatives
of the Soviet Jewry Commit.
tee met with Newton's
Mayor, Theodore Mann, and
proclaimed Aug. 12 "a day
of commitment to human
rights for all peoples and a

special remembrance to the
`Night of the Murdered
Poets.' " In Minneapolis, a
memorial ceremony was
sponsored by the Minneso-
ta-Dakotas Action Commit-
tee for Soviet Jewry.

In Washington, the daily
Soviet Jewry vigil opposite
the Soviet Embassy, me-
morialized the murdered
poets and intellectuals
with a minha service and
readings of the works of
the slain poets.

Russian Cards
Made Available

The Detroit Committee
for Soviet Jewry has Jewish
New Year cards available in
English and Russian that
they would like sent to So-
viet Jewish families.
Persons interested in
sending the cards can con-
tact Rae Sharfman,
:352-7123: or Ida Joyrich,
626-4799.

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Telegrams also were
sent to President Gerald
R. Ford and Secretary of
State Henry Kissenger,
asking that the U.S. gov-
ernment protest the trials
and call for dismissal of
charges.

The charges against
Malkin stem from his activi-
ties in the Soviet Jewry
movement.
Malkin, a 21-year old
"refusenik" from Moscow,
was dismissed from school
after he renounced Soviet
citizenship and applied for
an exit visa for Israel. He
then received a draft notice
to report for military duty,
which he refused to ac-
knowledge on grounds that
he was no longer a Soviet
citizen. Malkin was arrested
in March for "draft eva-
sion."
The Student Struggle -for
Soviet Jewry also reported
that Aleksandr Silnitsky,

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tion, whom he hoped to con-
tact.
In Detroit, the Jewish
Community Council sent
cables to Soviet authorities,
asking that they show good
faith in observing the spirit
of detente and the provi-
sions of the recently signed
Helsinki pact by dismissing
charges pending against
Roitburd and Anatoly
Malkin of Moscow.
The cables were sent to
Communist Party chief
Leonid Brezhnev and Pro-
curator General Roman
Rudenko. A separate cable
concerning Malkin was for-
warded to Senior Interroga-
tor Klissko, the Odessa offi-
cial who is prosecuting the
case against Roitburd.

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NEW YORK — Two men
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pleaded guilty to related
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York nursing home entre-
preneur.
Mark Loren, former ad-
ministrator of the Towers
Nursing Home, became the
first person to plead guilty
in the nursing-home investi-
gation when he waived his
right to an indictment and
pleaded to a conspiracy
charge on Monday, disclos-
ing his cooperation with the
prosecution.
The Towers, now closed,
was the focus of the Federal
and state indictments ac-
cusing Bergman and his
son, Stanley, of stealing $1.2
million in Medicaid funds.

Samuel A. Dachowitz,
personal accountant for
and a close associate of
Bergman, also pleaded
guilty to Federal fraud
charges and disclosed that
he was cooperating with
the prosecution in the
Bergman case.

One of the charges
against the Bergmans is the
concealment of the Towers
partnership. The elder Berg-
man is accused of selling an
85 percent interest in the
Towers to several partners.
The Bergmans have denied
all charges.
Dachowitz and Loren
have stated that they were
among the 11 undisclosed
partners.

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