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July 11, 1975 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, July 11, 1975 9

Banned Book Released by Israeli Censor

• SALES SERVICE PRICE

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
The Israeli military censor
has released for publication
a revised version of Matti
Golan's book on the negotia-
tions conducted in 1974 be-
tween Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger and Is-
raeli leaders that led to the
cease fire agreements and
the disengagement agree-
`,ents with Egypt and

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The original version was
barred by the censor two
months ago and the manu-
scripts and all pertinent
notes were seized, raising a
furor among Israeli journal-
ists and others.
The release of the book
was announced by the au-
thor at a hastily convened
press conference Tuesday.
Golan, political correspond-
ent of Haaretz, said he had
learned only a half hour ear-

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lien of the censors decision
and was, in fact, about to
lodge another protest over
the delay. He said that
when he submitted his re-
vised version last May, he
was promised a decision
within a week.
But the writer was jubi-
lant.. "I believe today, as I
have always believed, that
Israel is a free, democratic
country which exercises
freedom of speech, though
I had some reservations
about the banning of the
book and the way it was
done," Golan told his fel-
low journalists.
He denied that he had
applied any pressure on the
censor to release the hook or
that he had contemplated at
any time violating Israeli.
law.
He also denied that there
was pressure from the
United States to ban publi-
cation of the book which has
two tentative titles: "Con-
frontation and Separation"
or "Kissinger in the Middle
East."
When the banning of the
hook was made public,
American newspapers re-
ported that it contained se-
cret verbatim transcripts of
private conversations be-
tween former Premier
Golda Meir and Kissinger
during which the latter al-
legedly made indiscreet re-
marks about other world
leaders.
Tuesday Golan said,

"The word Ford was not
mentioned in the book,
neither as a car nor as a
president," Golan said.
According to the original
reports, Kissinger referred
to President Ford as "a
political child" and re-
marked that President
Hafez Assad of Syria
"picks his nose."
Golan said that. as far as
he knew, Kissinger had not
expressed an interest in
seeing the book. He said
that he was informed by the
chief military censor, Gen.
Walter Baron, by telephone
that the hook would be ap-
proved with only marginal
deletions. Golan said the
Hebrew edition will contain
between 270-280 pages and
the English version 320-339
pages because it will include
an additional chapter not
contained in the Hebrew
Edition — the story behind
its banning.
Golan said the book dealt
with the political negotia-
tions between Oct. 6, 1973,
the day the Yom Kippur
War broke out, and May 31,
1974, the day the disengage-
ment agreement *as signed
with Syria.
He said it had six parts
describing the American
airlift; the cease-fire; the
kilometer 101 negotiations
"none of these statements
appear in my book and I
don't know if Kissinger
made any of the remarks
mentioned.

Kissinger and Rabbi Banter
At Dinitz Son's Reception

WASHINGTON — Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer and Rabbi Stanley
Rabbinowitz of Cong. Adas
Israel exchanged friendly
jests at the Bar Mitzva re-
ception for the son of Israel
Ambassador Simcha Dinitz
last month.
The rabbi, president-elect
of the Rabbinical Assembly
of America, admoniShed
Kissinger for sending Un-
dersecretary Joseph Sisco to
the morning services.
The rabbi said he told
Kissinger at the reception

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that "had he attended serv-
ices that morning, we would
have offered him an aliya."
The rabbi also told Kis-
singer that he had two ser-
mons prepared: one if Kis-
singer attended and one if
Kissinger was not present.
The Rabbi spoke about
keeping the passes open
between Sinai and Jerusa-
lem.
Kissinger responded that
"I'm glad that my absence
gave you the opportunity to
deliver the better one."

.Never Too Late
jor Bar Mitzva

JERUSALEM (JTA) — It
is never too late to celebrate
one's Bar Mitzva, not even at
82.
When Benjamin Swig of
Taunton, Mass. reached 13
in 1906 he could not cele-
brate his Bar Mitzva be-
cause the small Massachu-
setts town had only eight
Jews and no rabbi.
However, he never gave
up the idea of celebrating
his Bar Mitzva, and so he
did, at 82. with a simple cer-
emony at the Western Wall.
Swig could afford to
waive the rights for a Bar
Mitzva present, and con-
tributed instead a $150,000
gift to the Jerusalem
Foundation for a unique
archaeological garden to
be created in the city.
The gift was handed to Je-
rusalem Mayor Teddy Kol-
lek, who is also chairman of
the Jerusalem Foundation.

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agreement with Egypt and
the one with Syria.

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