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June 27, 1975 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-06-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

14 Friday, June 27, 1975

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Max Fisher Acclaims Ford's M. E. Aims, Backs Him for Re-Election

In an interview granted in
Jerusalem to Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency representa-
tives, David Landau, the Is-
rael correspondent, and
Jack Siegel, JTA executive
vice president in New York,
Max M. Fisher commended
President Ford's Middle
East efforts.
In the interview, and ad-
vance portion of which ap-
peared in last week's Jewish
News, Fisher asserted that
he will be active in the 1976
campaign for Ford's 1976
presidential campaign. He
criticized the tactics of some
American Jewish leaders as
well as Senator Hanry M.
Jackson, while crediting all
of them with sinceritytin
dealing with the Russian-
Jewish a,,gd the Middle East
situation.
Fisher, who was re-
elected chairman of the
Jewish Agency Board of
Governors, spoke of Presi-
dent Ford in almost a fath-
erly tone but with admira-

*

tion and deference. He has
known him for more than 20
years, since the days when
"Jerry" was a young con-
gressman from his own
state of Michigan. Now,
however, he finds himself
addressing him as "Mr.Pres-
ident." Partly, it is the ef-
fect of the Oval Office and
the trappings of the Presi-
dency, but also, he says, the
effect of Ford's perceptible
and impressive growth in
stature as he "takes hold" of
the Presidency.

Ford has in effect an-
nounced his candidacy for
1976 and Fisher asserts
that he (Fisher) will be
"very involved" in the
campaign.

Ford has always "had a
strong feeling for the ac-
complishments of the Jew-
ish people," Fisher says.
"He admires people who do
things for themselves." The
fact that the President is a
religious man has also influ-
enced him towards a con-

*

*

Jewish Agency Picks Fisher
to Head Board of Governors

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
The Jewish Agency's board
of governors, under • the
chairmanship of Max Fisher
of , Detroit, was unani-
mously re-elected at the
agency's fourth annual as-
sembly.
Six former members who
did not stand for re-election
were replaced by five new
members for a total mem-
bership of 42 instead of 43.
The new members are Jo-
seph Kumkummer, of Bel-
gium; Donald Robinson and
Frank Lautenberg, both of
the United States; Dr. Car-
los Goldmann, of Venezuela;
and Phillip Granowsky of
Canada. Lautenberg is gen-
eral chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal.
They replaced Rabbi Is-
rael Miller, of the U.S.
chairman of the Conference
of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions who was previously
president of the American
Zionist federation; Thomas
Hecht, of Canada; and Max
Schein, of Mexico, all of
whom declined to stand for
re-election for personal rea-
sons; and Tibor Rosenbaum,
of Geneva; Albert Adelman
and Edward Ginsberg, of
the U.S.

The 300 delegates
adopted resolutions ex-
pressing world Jewry's
unity with Israel,. concern
for the plight, of Soviet
Jewry and pledged to in-
tensify the fight against
the Arab boycott, to prom-
ote aliya and to work to
build a model Jewish so-
ciety in Israel.

The assembly adopted a
resolution stressing the pri-
macy of the/ United Jewish
Appeal andi the United Is-
rael Appeal as the fund-
raising instruments for Is-
rael and emphasized the
importance of cash contri-
butions.
The resolution stated that
the UJA and UJA "are the
only instruments author-
ized to raise funds for the
basic human needs of Israel

and must not be eroded by
diversion or competition for
funds, times and energies of
other drives . . ."
The assembly resolution
on Jewish uhity declared ad-
miration for the "superb
courage of the people of Is-
rael." Expressing concern
over the continuing haras-
ment and persecution of
Soviet Jews, the assembly
declared that "We say to our
brothers and sisters in the
Soviet Union that the Jews
of the free world will inten-
sify their efforts to open the
gates, so that they will be
permitted to join their
brothers and sisters in Is-
rael."
The delegates called on
Jews throughout the world
to combat the Arab boycott
and to condemn those who
yield to blackmail and place
economic and political expe-
diency above international
morality. The assembly also
condemned terrorism and
those who "have condoned
this savagery" in the counL
cils of the world.

The agency adopted a
surprise resolution sup-
porting charter flights to
Israel before it wound up
its fourth annual session.

The resolution was pro-
posed from the floor by an
American delegate, Merill
Hasselfield, a member of
the assembly's fund-raising
committee, who argued that
the more Jews who come to
Israel as tourists, the more
are prompted to increase
their donations to the
United Jewish Appeal of the
Keren Hayesod-United Is-
rael Appeal.
The Israeli government is
sharply split on the issue of
charter flights. The minis-
try of tourism, worried
about the severe decline in
tourism this year, has been
urging that the charter ban
be lifted. But the transport
ministry, under pressure
from El Al, Israel's national
air carrier, has gone on rec-
ord in opposition to charter
flights.

sistent sympathy with the able man (Fisher has known
Zionist cause which, Fisher him for many years), there
asserts with confidence, has is no truth in the rumor that
he, together with Illinois
not changed since he as
Republican Sen. Charles
sumed office.
Ford certainly perceives - Percy and White House aide
Israel as the bastion of de- Bob Goldwin are seeking to
mocracy" in the Mideast, elbow Kissinger off center-
and believes in "the funda- stage on Mideast issues,
mental dovetailing of Amer- Fisher asserts.
The Jewish Agency As-
ican and Israeli interests in
the deterrent of Soviet ex- sembly this year is taking
pansionism," Fisher says. place under the shadow of
At•he same time though, he steeply declining aliya fig-
points out, the President is ures from the Soviet Union.
constantly conscious of the Fisher sighs resignedly —
broader American interests as if to say: I told you so. He
in the region, especially in had warned, he now recalls,
preventing an infiltration of against forcing the Soviets
Soviet power into the oil- into an intolerable situa-
tion. "Nixon and Kissinger
producing areas.

Fisher's frequent meet-
ings with the President
are public knowledge since
in the Ford White House
the secrecy of the Nixon
years has dissipated and
the appointments appear
on the daily calendar.
Asked about the rumors
current in some American-
Jewish quarters that a
new combination compris-
ing Rumsfeld, Percy and
Goldwin is moving into a
predominant role in Jew-
ish and Israel-oriented
policymaking, Fisher dis-
misses the notion with a
wave of the hand.

kept saying all along: Let's incentive to let the Jews
not rub their faces in it leave," Fisher points out.
. . ." Fisher was inclined to The Jewish pressure
agree with them. He advo- groups were also partly to
cated striking a deal with blame for - the overkill,
the Soviets — beneficial to Fisher Says sadly. The So-
all concerned and with all viet Jewry campaign devel-
concerned able to live with it oped a momentum of its
honorably. own which in the end over-
In the light of hindsight, reached itself. Everyone
he blames Sen. Henry M. acted out of the very best
(Scoop) Jackson's (D. motives. Jackson "has al-
Wash.) Presidenttial ambi- ways been a good friend of
tions primarily for the im- the Jews," Fisher stresses.
politic "overkill." The last But the overall result has
straw for the Soviets had been to weaken rather than
been the niggardly $300 mil- strengthen the leverage
lion trade credits voted by wherewith it was hoped to
Congress as part of .the most influence the Soviets to-
favored nation clause. "The wards a more liberal emi-
result is that they have little gration policy.

++4"14*****44 44+++++++44

4.

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Princeton's

BAR MITZUA, MEN

While Donald Rumsfeld,
President Ford's White
House Chief of Staff, is cer-
tainly a rising star in the
Administration and a most

Michael Schatz

`Hatred of Enemy
a Vital Quality
of Syrian Army'

son of

Mr. & Mrs.

Frederick Schatz

of West Bloomfield

TEL AVIV —
article
published by the 'Syrian
army journal Jish a-Shaab
dealt with the factors influ-
encing the combat behavior
of the Syrian soldier.
The writer, Nabil Baluk-
bashi, said in part:
"The compulsory military
emotions, loyalty to the
homeland and hatred of the
enemy increase the war-
rior's courage, for these are
the most difficult tasks con-
ceivable.
"The first thing sensed by
the man in the battlefield is
a surging of anger and
hatred toward the enemy.
This hatred reaches its peak
and thus the warrior can ov-
ercome many difficulties
and dangers he would be
incapable of overcoming
under regular circumst-
ances."

83.

111*

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THAT "SPECIAL DAY!"

Europe Arms
Pact Aids Israel

U.S. —

NEW YORK (ZINS) —
The decision of four Euro-
pean countries (Norway,
Holland, Denmark and Bel-
gium) to purchase the U.S.
made combat plane F-16
rather than the French Mi-
rage F-1 is not only of im-
portance to the American
arms industry but also has
vital significance for Israel.
Best estimates are that
America will be selling her
allies approximately 2,500
aircraft. Mass production
will substantially lower the
unit price.
Israel is interested in ac-
quiring the F-16 and it is,
therefore. in her interest
that the plane be available
at the lowest possible price.

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