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June 20, 1975 - Image 19

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Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-06-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, June 20, 1975 19




Zionist Leader Remembers Dr. Weizmann: MOVING?

By ROSE HALPRIN

(Copyright 1975, JTA, Inc.)

(Editor's note: Rose
Halprin, the veteran Zion-
ist leader, delivered an
address at the Herzl Insti-
tute in New York in which
she discussed her personal
encounters with Dr.
Chaim Weizmann. The all-
day session, at which oth-
ers discussed various as-
pects of Weizmann's activ-
ities and career, was part
of the Weizmann Centen-
nial.)

I first saw and heard Dr.
Chaim Weizmann when my
father took me to a Zionist
meeting on the Lower East
Side. I had never seen him
before or heard him before.
He spoke mamaloshen — he
spoke Yiddish at that time.
He spoke as a Jew to Jews.
After a while, when I be-
came a so-called Zionist
leader, I met Dr. Weizmann
under different circumst-
ances. I think I'm going to
go back to the Congress of
'46.
Europe was cold and hun-
gry. There was nothing. But
for us who met there, there
was something much sad-
der, much deeper. For those
with whom we used to sit at
Congresses were not there;
and those who were there
were really only the rem-
nants of great Jewish com-
munities. So we sat and
mourned and planned.

But the Congress re-
fused to elect Weizmann,
for a very interesting rea-
son. We knew by that time
that the British govern-
ment would not honor the
pledge of the Balfour Dec-
laration. We knew that we
were on a collision course
with Great Britain, and
there were those who said
that for that kind of strug-
gle with Great Britain,
Weizmann was not the
man. Perhaps he wasn't.
The strange thing was
that those who led the
fight against Weizmann
were the Labor people.

Weizmann loved Labor;
Weizmann understood agri-
culture and the farms and
the kibutzim and the kibutz-
nik. This was part of his life
and part of the thing that he
was, that he was so at ease
with Labor. And yet it was
Labor that had to lead the
fight against him because
they thought — I think now
that they were right and
perhaps we were wrong —
he could not really have
been a bitter enemy of the
British people or the British
government.

He was not the president
of the Zionist movement in
the next year and a half, but
he was the president of the
Zionist movement. People
didn't know that he hadn't
gotten the presidency. Weiz-
mann was the president.

Li v Judaism Prohibits
Practice of Sterlization

Judaism does not permit
sterilization. The rabbis
trace this to a Biblical
source (Leviticus 22:24)
where practices like this are
forbidden in the Bible.
Some commentaries
(Abrabanel, Chinuch and
Ibn Ezra) consider such a
practice as interfering with
matters which are only the
prerogative of the Al-
mighty, they claim. Fur-
thermore, one who has him-
self castrated or sterilized in
some way indicates his dis-
satisfaction with the world
because he evidently would
like to see less people enjoy
it.
Judaism always had a
positive outlook on life and
the world as a whole.
Sterilization in males is
a more severe crime than

`Ousting of Israel
From the UN
Would Be Drastic'

COPENHAGEN (JTA) —
Danish Foreign Minister
K.B. Andersen, returning
from Moscow, told journal-
ists last week that the exclu-
sion of Israel from the
United Nations would be
drastic.
He added that the Soviets
consider the UN a universal
organization.
Asked about the possible
installation of a Palestine
Liberation Organization in-
formation bureau in Copen-
hagen, Andersen said: "An
information office does not
need government permis-
sion to open in Denmark."

sterilization in females.
Furthermore, if it is a ma-
ter of saving an individu-
al's life by sterilizing him,
this is of course permitted.
There are Jewish law au-
thorities who claim that
under certain conditions fe-
males may sterilize them-
selves by taking certain
medication to drink, be-
cause the command to re-
produce was generally
charged to the male.

Egypt Is Digging
Under Suez Canal

NEW YORK (ZINS) — A
Reuters dispatch reports
the ceremonial ground-
breaking attended by Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat in con-
nection with Egypt's dig-
ging of five separate tunnels
under the waters of the
Suez Canal to link the west-
ern and eastern banks of the
Sinai.
The avowed purpose of
these tunnels is to channel
water from the Nile to the
Sinai Desert. The under-
ground passageways will
accommodate railroad
tracks, water pipes and even
trucks.
The Egyptians believe
that as many as a million
young people will want to
settle in the Sinai where the
government expects to es-
tablish fishing villages and
tourist facilities.
The tunnels will also have
a vital military application
as conduits for the move-
ment of heavy artillery and
tanks to the eastern shore of
the canal.

Nevertheless, I saw him
in that period as a scientist.
I was in Rehovot and I re-
member him in a white
linen jacket — the research
man. He said, "Science will
help build the state of Israel
when it comes as we want it
to be built." He was not the
scientist first and the Labor
leader second . . . the Zion-
ist second. No, he was scien-
tist and Zionist at the same
time.
So he talked about
science. He was very inter-
ested, as you know, in ap-
plied science and what it
might do to help a poor
country, poor in natural
resources, reach that level
that he wanted so desper-
ately for it. In 1947, when
the Palestine question was
on the agenda of the
United Nations, it was
Weizmann who appeared
before the United Nations
Special Committee on Pa-
lestine (UNSCOP), and
Weizmann who pleaded
his people's cause as no
other man, no other Zion-
ist leader could.
I did not see him in Jeru-
salem, but I saw him here in
New York when he ap-
peared before the United
Nations. You remember
that at that time the Jewish
Agency was given a sort of
observer status. We sat
within the United Nations,
but not as delegates. We had
people who spoke on behalf
of the Zionist cause. Weiz-
mann was one of them.
I shall never forget him as
he was then. He was old; he
was sick; he was half blind.
He had cards where the
words were written an inch
high, and he read them
badly because he could only
see badly. But there was not
a man or woman in that
hall, not Jew nor gentile,
who did not know that here
was a spokesman of an an-
cient people and an ancient
culture; here was the man
whose ancestors were the
prophets; here was the man
who was full of anguish for
his people but full of hope
for his people and plans for
his people.
There was never a speech
like that nor a speaker like
that — ill-equipped physi-
cally in every way, and yet
somehow or other reaching
out to every man and
woman who heard him. I
saw him quite often in Re-
hovot when he was the pres-
ident.
First of all, I must tell
you that Vera Weizmann
liked a game of bridge. My
husband and I played
bridge very well, and so
we would be invited for
dinner. Chaim would talk,
and then Vera at the end
would say, "Chaim, now
it's my turn," and we
would go to the bridge ta-
ble. He could have talked
all night. That's the way it
was — talk, and then some
bridge for her.
I think it was Weizmann
who said that those were
the happiest days of his life
or the most exciting. I don't
think so. I know that it
wasn't so. Weizmann once
said to me, "You know," he
said, "they come — (Moshe)

Sharret." He mentioned
Sharett particularly.
"Sharett and others, and
they talk to me, but," he
said, "they don't ask me to
give them guidance. They
don't see in me the man who
is leading the Jewish people
in statehood." He wanted
desperately to be a presi-
dent like an American presi-
dent. He would have loved
that, for he was a political
man.
This reminded me of an
episode. The sitting room
of the Rehovot house was a
beautiful room, long, well
lived in. They had a fan-
cier, more formal sitting
room. But this was where
everybody lived. The
room, as I say, was long
and narrow. In the back
were glass doors leading to
the garden. Vera and I
were sitting there one eve-
ning. Weizmann was al-
ready ill and confined to
bed. As we talked she said,
"Look!" Through the win-
dow had streamed the
light of the setting sun,
and hit the head and face
of Dr. Weizmann; it was
bathed in the golden colors
of the setting sun.
In a few weeks, Weiz-



mann was gone. But some- • •

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how, as I saw the room •
IN YOUR HOME
again, and often when I
ESTATES LIQUIDATED
think of him, I think of that

MARION GASPAS

episode: the setting sun ba- t•
626-8402
626-6795


thing in glory the head of
IRENE EAGLE


626-4769
626-8907
Weizmann as his day too

ended.
1 02_111,•=4110 011, 04190•4110•411 *le

Author Eliot
Backed Zionism
Prior to Herzl

George Eliot was one of
the great precursors of
Theodor Herzl and among
the most eminent Christian
Zionists in history.
Her "Daniel Deronda"
remains a classic in advanc-
ing the Zionist cause, and
her views preceded official
Zionist pronouncements by
more than two decades.
Alfred A. Knopf an-
nounces the publication of a
new biography, "George
Eliot: The Emergent Self,"
by Ruby V. Redinger. It is
hailed as "a monumental
study of a monumental hu-
man being."





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