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May 16, 1975 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

24 Friday, May 16, 1975

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Impact of Jewish Cooking

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright 1975, JTA, Inc.)

The importance of the
Jewish mothers' cooking in
preserving our heritage is to
be seen in the various foods
associated with the holi-
days. Would we know it was
Purim without haman-
_ tashen; Hanuka without
latkes or Shavuot without
blintzes?
We think the Purim ha-
mantashen convey the mes-
sage of that holiday as well
as the rabbi's sermon.
The Jewish mother has
not been given the credit
for her inventiveness. Con-
sider the waste on the in-
dustrial world of today.
The Jewish mother wasn't
guilty of such things. She
took the left overs and
combined them — and be-

hold — there was
tsimmes?
Take the ordinary Jewish
immigrant even in America
— which was truly a Pr6m-
ised Land to him. He had
been forced to emigrate. He
couldn't speak the language
well.
He would pick up his Jew-
ish paper and read about po-
groms in a half dozen differ-
ent parts of the world, about
quotas limiting Jews going
to college, about a score of
other discriminations.
But on Saturday he would
come from the synagogue —
and there would be kugel. It
was good to eat and if there
is one thing good, maybe
there are other things good.
Some day, he said to hin
self, the whole world will L.
as good as kugel.

REGULATION AND TRUCKING

Some people feel the regulated transportation
system of the United States should not be regulated.
They argue, the industry which approves of regulation,
must be' lining their pockets because of it And for
these reasons, they argue the Interstate Commerce
Commission should be abolished.

We have regulation for one prime reason—to insure
transportation service and standardized rates for com-
munities located away from major shipping centers
such as Detroit. Here, there is no cutthroat competi-

tion or biased rates. A shipper in Alpena can send his
freight for the same rate as a shipper of similar freight
in _Detroit.

Shippers and merchants in places like Muskegon,,
Jackson, Petoskey and Midland can count on regular
service and standard rates that do not change daily..or
'hourly because of ICC regulation.

The way we see it, without regulation, Michigan
communities would have little to depend- upon, ex-
cept extremely poor service and a- very unfair rate
system.

A regulated transportation system is not the best
of all possible worlds, But it is far better than no
transportation system at all. Or worse, a government-
run system.

MICHIGAN
TRUCKING
ASSOCIATION, Inc.

TAKE TIME TO LOOK
HERE
Every Man's Size

Men's Fashions

Alterations Free

Leisure Su' its

Everyday Discounts

Sensational Shirts

Timely Savings

Open

Evenings

Personal

Service

Lincoln
Tower Apt.
Don't Miss Us

THE MALE STOP LTD.
15075 Lincoln E. of Greenfield_

Mrs. Reva Lindenbaum, 69

Reva Lindenbaum, a long-
time philanthropist, died
May 14 at age 69.
Born in Russia, Mrs. Lin-
denbaum lived 53 years in
Detroit. With her husband,
Harry, Mrs. Lindenbaum
established a scholarship at
Wayne State University for
a chair in Judaic studies and
the Harry and Reva Linden-
baum Library at the United
Hebrew Schools.
A member of Hadassah,
she was honored by the na-
tional organization when
she and her husband estab-
lished the Lindenbaum
Nurses Residency at Hadas-
sah-Hebrew University
Hospital in Jerusalem. She
and her husband also set up
an outpatient department at
the Oncology Institute of
the hospital. She resided at
16184 Cumberland, South-
field.
Mrs. Lindenbaum was a
member of Pioneer Women

and Women's American
ORT, and offered her serv-
ices to the Women's Division
of the Allied Jewish Cam-
paign, the Israel Histadrut
Campaign • the American
Foundation for the Blind.
Besides her husband,
Mrs. Lindenbaum leaves a
sister, Mrs. Elias (Mary)
Cohen.

Polk Memorial Set

A fund has been estab-
lished at Wayne State Uni-
versity in memory of Sam-- ■
uel S. Polk, an English
teacher with the Detroit
Public Schools for 38 years,
and a former teacher at
Cong. Shaarey Zedek and
Temple Beth El, who died
May 6.
Contributions can be sent
to the Samuel S. Polk Me-
morial Fund, Wayne, State
Fund, Wayne State Univer-
sity, Detroit 48202. .

OBITUARIES

(Continued from Page 55)
HARRY A. PENFIL,
former Detroiter, of New-
port Beach, Calif., died May
8. He leaves two sons, Rob-
ert L. and Dr. Richard L. of
Newport Beach; four broth-
ers, Morris David of Miami
Beach, Louis of Philadel-
phia and Jack of California;
and five grandchildren.

* * *

(

two sisters, Ella Davis of
North Miami Beach and
Minnie Bernstein of Massa-
chusetts.
* * *
FLORENCE SCHIN-
DLER died May 11. She
leaves her husband, Ed-
ward; a son, Alan; a daugh-
ter, -Mrs. Charles (Ronna)
McFalls; her mother, Mrs.
Louis (Mary) Bernstein; a
sister, Mrs. Zigmund (Lil-
lian) Grey;' and one grand-
daughter.

ALEX ROTH of Oak
Park died May 11. He leaveg
* * *
his wife, Hermina; a son Irv-
ing; a daughter, Mrs. Meyer
DAVID SPILKIN, 22400
(Evelyn) Wiss; and six
Lucerne Dr., Southfield,
grandchildren.
died May 13. gurvived by his
* * *
MORRIS SANDLER, wife, Rose; five daughters,
former Detroiter of North Mrs. Morris (June) Cole,
Miami Beach, died April 26. Mrs. Allan (Dodo) Stein,
Survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Grossbart, Mrs.
Sidney (Shirley) Verier and
Frances; a brother, John of Mrs.
Jerry (Judy) Sillman;
North Miami Beach; and
13 grandchildren and
14-great-grandchildren.
* * *
EVELYN M. UNGAR,
4237 Elm Crest Dr., West
Bloomfield, died May 9. She
Wiesenthal said Austrian leaves two sons, Kalman H.
judicial authorities have not and Seymour A.; and seven
held a single war crimes grandchildren.
trial in three years. He said
* * *
their explanation was that
ANNA
WEINSTEIN,
they feared the trials would 29090 Wellington
W.,
end in acquittal.,
Southfield,
died
May
11.
According to Wiesenthal,
a total of 800 war crimes Survived by a son, Jack; two
cases were under investiga- daughters, Rebecca Win-
tion in Austria in 1970. Five ston and Mrs. Jacob (Mollie)
years later, all but about 30 Schaffer of Chicago, and
three grandchildren.
were discontinued, he said.

Austrians Discontinue Nazi Case

VIENNA (JTA) — -The
Austrian Justice Depart-
ment, acting clandestinely,
discontinued criminal pro-
ceedings one year ago
against Franz Murer, a Nazi
war criminal believed re-
sponsible for the death of
80,000 Jews in the Vilna
ghetto during World War II. -



Simon Wiesenthal, head
of the Nazi War Crimes
Documentation Center here,
said that he discovered the
order of discontinuance by
accident when he checked
with the Justice Ministry on
the progress of the Murer
case.

Wiesenthal, who played
a part 'in tracking down
Adolf Eichmann, found
Murer hiding out in an
Austrian inn in 1947. He
was extradited to the So-

Rosenbaum Bail
Set At $2 Million

GENEVA, May '7 (JTA)
— A Geneva remand court
set $2 million for financier
Tibor Rosenbaum who is
charged with "misman-
agement." Sources close to
the Rosenbaum family term
the bail as "prohibitive" and
say that there is no chance
they will be able to raise it.

Abraham Rimmer, a di-
rector of the International
Credit Bank controlled by
Rosenbaum, was set free
without bail. He was
charged with "fraudulent
stock exchange maneuvers,"
a crime under Swiss crimi-
nal court.

Baron de RothsChild, the
Israel Corporation's chair-
man, first lodged a criminal
complaint against Rosen-
baum last October. Roths-
child since discovered that
Michael Tzur, former corpo-
ration director, had trans-
ferred to Rosenbaum $2 mil-
lion on April 29, 1974. It is
believed that Rosenbaum
will appeal the court's deci-
sion.

viet Union where he was
sentenced to a 25-year
prison term for war crimes
but was returned to his na-
tive Austria in 1955 on con-
dition that a new trial
would be held. Murer went
on trial in Graz in 1964 but
was acquitted. The Aus-
trian Supreme Court or-
dered a re-trial the follow-
ing year but it was never
held.

Warsaw Uprising Leader
Breaks Silence in Article

By EDWIN EYTAN

(Copyright 1975, JTA, Inc.)

The last of the five men
who led the Warsaw Ghetto
uprising broke his 32-year
silence in an interview with
the French magazine L'Ex-
press.

Dr. Marek Edelman does
not like to talk about his
painful memories. The War-
saw uprising was not, for
him, a chance to die with
glory, but .a way of inform-
ing the world of the ghetto's
existence.

During the Warsaw up-
rising, which lasted from
April 19 to May 10, 1943, the
handful of Jews who shot at
their Nazi oppressors had
only one hope. The hope
that, on the other side of the
wall that surrounded the
ghetto,, the whole world
would learn they were not
dead without a battle.
Mordecai Anielewicz's
group became best-known ,
of the ghetto uprising. On
May 8, when they realized
they could do nothing
more, they used their last
bullets for themselves and
their families. Edelman
and 40 of his companions
escaped through a sewer.
Dr. Edelman, a messen-
ger at the Warsaw Hospital
during the ghetto period,
said he had never under-
stood why the Germans
wanted to take the Jews
from the ghetto to die at
Treblinka. They could have
let the typhoid take care of
them; 5,000 died every
month.

.

Abyssinians Block
Exit of Falashas

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
At the hospital, too, the The Abyssinian authorities,
last moments of the ghetto
at the last moment, have
were terrible. The Nazis had cancelled exit permits for 70
decided to clear out all of Falashas (black Jews) who
the old, the sick. Doctors were intending to emigrate
and nurses injected poison to Israel.
into the veins of their con- • It is assumed that the ban
demned family members. was the result of direct
"Cyanide is better than the
by Moslem circles.
gas chamber," Dr. Edelman
explained.
One nurse, he recalled,
SAVE $100
or more on
was considered a heroine be-
cause she had used her poi-
SCM
IBM ,
son supply to kill a whole
OLIVETTI
ward of sick children. At the
Add 'n Type
time, it was an unheard of
342-7800
399-8333
sacrifice, Dr. Edelman said.
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