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March 21, 1975 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, March 21, 1975 21

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Kissinger Peace Shuttle May Be Stalemated

agreement and several areas thinking processes of the
of disagreement," the Secre- Egyptian population.
tary said, adding that Sadat
Washington analysts say
has given him "some addi- the Egyptian news - media
tional considerations and are not preparing the Arab
ideas" to take back to Israel. public for any significant
Sadat said it was "not political concessions by
feasible and is really ab- Egypt in return for Israel's
surd" to discuss a normali- withdrawal from the stra-'
zation of relations with Is- tegic passes and oil fields in
rael before there is an the Sinai.
overall settlement of the
The Cairo media remain
Middle East conflict. He silent on conciliation --with
said there was no point in Israel. Rather, they are
discussing non:belligerency. emphasizing that the Cairo
"We shall not agree to end press is unanimous that on
the state of belligerency as his current visit to Israel,
long as there are any for- Kissinger would present a
eign soldiers on our land," Sadat specification that Is-
Sadat declared.
raeli withdrawal in the
He declined to say Sinai must be related to a
JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Israeli negotiators believe a whether Egypt would similar withdrawal on the
serious impasse has been agree to demilitarize terri- Syrian front and the invit-
reached in efforts to achieve tory evacuated by Israel ing of the Palestinians to
a second stage Israeli-Egyp- but said it was quite natu- Geneva.
ral that a strengthened
While Israelis say any
tian agreement in Sinai.
President Anwar Sadat United Nations presence Israeli-Egyptian agreement
flatly rejected Israel's de- would be part of a second must not be altered at Ge-
mands for a formal non-bel- stage disengagement neva, the semi-official Al
Ahram is saying editorially
agreement.
ligerency accord.
Officials here stressed in Cairo that the current
A "senior U.S. official" on
Kissinger's plane told re- that the non-belligerency discussions are not being
porters the Secretary's issue is still the main stick- held for the purpose of end-
ing the war or concluding a
shuttle diplomacy mission ing point of an agreement.
Israeli sources said peace treaty.
was not yet deadlocked, that
The newspaper Al Akh-
an accord could still be bluntly that they regarded
reached and the negotia- the "substantial ideas" Kis- bar declared that Kissin-
tions had not reached "the singer brought from Egypt ger's task is aimed at
crunch point." The official last Friday as unsatisfac- bringing about a new Is-
said that the situation was tory. Rabin reportedly told raeli withdrawal. This
not yet ripe for Dr. Kissin- the Secretary that Egypt's task, it said, is known to
ger to introduce initiatives conditions for a new settle- all except Israel.
An earlier analysis in
and ideas of his own. What ment did not meet Israel's
both Israel and Egypt now demands for a clear, public, Washington that Egypt was
needed, he said, was "to-- written renunciation of bel-
take stock of where they ligerency by both sides.
Defense Minister Shimon
stand."
Nevertheless, the feeling Peres said that even if Kis-
here was that a stalemate singer's "shuttle" diplomacy
situation has occurred is eventually successful, "a
that could be changed only difficult period will ensue"
and peace would not neces-
if Israel gives in.
Kissinger told reporters sarily follow.
He said the basic prob-
in Aswan that there were
still "several substantial lem was that peace be-
areas of disagreement" be- tween Israel and Egypt
tween Egypt and Israel. was not merely a geo-
"The gap has been narrowed graphical issue but "an
but it remains to be seen exercise in public rela-
whether, it will be finally tions" in which the Egyp-
tian leadership would
closed," he said.
"There are some areas of have to transform the

Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger's shut-
tling mission appears to
have bogged in a stalemate
agonized by frustration.
While' retaining a mea-
sure of hope that some-
thing can be attained, Kis-
singer has admitted
frUstration over the hard-
ening positions and lack of
movement on the part of
both Egypt and Israel.
There were reports from
Washington that Egypt's
expressions of optimism
before the talks began
were an effort to blame
7 failure in the talks on

.

deliberately inflating Kis-
singer's chances of success
in order to pin the blame on
Israel as "intransigent" if he
fails, appears to be ac-
curate.
The Cairo propaganda
appears to be abetted by
some American commenta-
tors who argue that if Israel
were not so intransigent
and gives up the land it oc-
cupied in the Six-Day War,
then peace would be, at
hand.
Egyptian President An-
war Sadat's public position
appears unchanged. His
people know only from their
media that an Israeli with-
drawal is imperative and
without any Egyptian ac-
ceptafice of Israel's sover-
eignty and a pledge of con-
tinuing negotiations to
achieve peace.

Sen. Stuart Symington
(D-Mo.) said Sunday that
peace in the Middle' East
depends on an agreement
between the United States
and the Soviet Union "as
to what should or
not be done" in that re-
gion.

Speaking on ABC-TV's
"Issues and Answers," he
said the "basic problems" in
the Middle East "not only
have to do with the new oil
problem but also with some
form of agreement between
the Soviet Union and United
States," Symington said. "If

we could get some agree-
ment between these two
superpowers as to what
should or should not be done
in the Middle East, that
would be the only thing that
could put us all more at ease
with respect to a possible
future war out there."
Soviet Leader Leonid I.
Breshnev made his first
public appearance in several
months Tuesday, and said
the USSR supports the se-

curity and independence of
all states in the Middle
East, implying without
mentioning Israel by name
that she was included.
But, as usual, he added
that Israel must give back
all territory she has ac-
quired from the Arabs and
recognize a Palestinian
state. Brezhev spoke in Bu-
dapest to the 11th congress
of the Hungarian Commun-
ist Party.

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EL AL

The Airline Of The People Of Israel

Extends best wishes for

Ir e

PLO Seeking UN Privileges;
Paris Parley Hits UNESCO

VIENNA, (JTA) — A
United Nations legal confer-
ence passed a resolution
calling on the UN General
Assembly to consider ex-
tending diplomatic immun-
ity and privileges_ to repre-
sentatives of the- Palestine
Liberation Organization.
It asked the same rights
for all liberation organiza-
.* tions recognized by the Or-
= - anization of African Unity
fr the Arab League, which
have observer status with an
international organization.
Israel, together with the
U.S., France, Britain and
West Germany, voted
against the resolution; 53
nations, mostly the East
European bloc and Third
World countries, supported
the resolution, and 15 ab-
stained. The resolution rec-
ommended that all UN
members grant such privi-
leges immediately while the
General Assembly's action
is pending.

Meanwhile, the organiz-

ers of the conference "For
the Universality of
UNESCO," which met in
Paris last weekend, re-
leased the names of 23
Nobel Prize winners and
more than 125 artists,
writers, scientists and_ed-
ucators who have _an-
nounced their support for
the conference and pro-
tested UNESCO's anti-Is-
rael discrimination.

The intellectuals, who did
not attend the conference
but had written to announce
their support, included writ-
ers Simone de Beauvoir,
Frederick Durrenmatt, Jo-
sef Kessel, Graham Green
and Gunther Grass; cinema
director Federico Fellini;
and conductor-composer
Leonard Bernstein.
The conference voted a
resolution calling upon all
UNESCO member states to
convene a special UNESCO
Assembly to reconsider and
change its anti-Israel reso-
lutions.

a happy and joyous

to all

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557 5737

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