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March 14, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, March 14, 1975

High regions are never with-
.t storms.
The higher the plum-tree the
per the plum, the richer the
bbler the blacker his thumb.

Happy the land which has
nothing for history.
History is philosophy teach-
ing by examples.
History repeats itself.

ALL GENERAL MOTORS

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CALL

Suburban Purchasing Service

559-8222

73

WHOLESALE TO-ALL!

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GEORGE BRANT

STAN FINSILVER

MERCEDES — JAGUAR — VOLVO
= DATSUN — MG — SUBARU —

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Trees planted by the Jewish
National Fund to act as
wind-and-water-breaks ar-
ound southern settlements
saved lives in one case, and
protected the land from the
raging elements in many
others, during the recent
flash flooding in the N.egev
and Sinai.
At De-Zahav, south of Ei-
lat on the Sinai coast, local
people said they escaped
drowning during the torren-
tial floods by clinging to
palm trees that JNF had
planted in the area some
years ago.
At Neviot, also south of
Eilat, JNF foresters found
. that the 30-40 meter wide
belts of trees planted ar-

ound the settlement to pro-
tect it from wind and sand
had withstood the storm
and protected the settlers
and their buildings.

Israel, Italy Sign
Culture Accord

JERUSALEM (JTA) — A
Hebrew language lecture-
ship is to be instituted at the
University of Venice under
the terms of a culture ac-
cord recently signed in Jeru-
salem between Israel and
Italy.
Other lectureships are
planned for Naples and
Rome universities — and
chairs in Italian at Tel Aviv,
Bar-Ilan and Beersheba
Universitites in Israel.

CUT YOUR
COST OF LIVING
AT ECHO VALLEY

:4;NAlige.

Mortgages have just been reduced for extra
savings. To our knowledge, this 7 3/4% rate
on condominiums for conventional 30 year
mortgages with 20% down is the best
you'll find anywhere.

You save $10,000 to start! Echo Valley
condominiums compare favorably with those
in the $45,-$50,000 range. Yet because
Echo Valley is a conversion of a luxury
apartment, prices are only $31,000 for a 1
bedroom place or $34,500 for a 2 bedroom,
2 bath model.

FARMINGTON'S
BEST BUY!

Echo Valley is very affordable!

LESS THAN RENT!

MONTHLY One Bedroom Two Bedroom
$322.16*
$293.86*
PAYMENT:

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1,2 &3 Bedroom
Condominiums
from $31,000

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There are no extra costs. All the latest
appliances, including brand new self-cleaning
ovens, dishwashers and self-defrosting
refrigerators are in and paid for. Your
selection of the finest Bigelow carpeting is
included in the purchase price.

12 Mile Road,
Farmington Hills, just
West of Orchard Lake
Road.
Model Open 12-6
Daily, Closed Thurs.
Phone: 477-8947

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BUYING A NEW CAR OR TRUCK?

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›-

JNF Trees Saved Land From Flood

'1 Bedroom with Mortgage of $24,800 & 56,200 Down. Monthly Payment: Principal & Interest: S177.67; Maintenance: $55; Taxes: 561.19.
2 Bedroom with mortgage of $27,600 & $6,900 Down. Monthly Payment: Principal & Interest: $197.73; Maintenance: $59.50; Taxes: $64.93.

Two Soviet Jewish Activists
Held on 'Unspecified Charges'

NEW YORK (JTA) —
Two of the seven Jewish ac-
tivists arrested while dem-
onstrating for exit visas
outside the Lenin Library in
Moscow Feb. 24 are being
held for trial on "unspec-
ified charges," it was re-
ported by the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry and
the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry.

The two are Mark Nash-
pitz and Boris Tsitlionok.
The other demonstrators
were given 10-15-day jail
sentences for "hooliganism"
or were released after ques-
tioning, the NCSJ said.
Another activist, Anatoly
Sharansky, who accompa-
nied relatives of Nashpitz
and Tsitlionok to KGB
headquarters to inquire
about the two men, said
they were told by an official
that they "will certainly
need the help of a lawyer."
Sharansky said that the
chief of the KGB's investiga-
tion department confirmed
that Nashpitz and Tsi-
tlionok were in prison'
"under investigation." He
would not specify the
charges because of "the se-
curity of the investigation,"
Sharansky reported.

Nashpitz, a 27-year-old
dentist, has been trying to
get an exit visa for four
years,. without success. In
1972 he was sentenced to
one year at "correctional
labor" for allegedly evad-
ing military call-up as a
reserve officer. AS SSJ
spokesman said the im-
pending trial of Nashpitz
and Tsitlionok is linked
with possible trials of
Jews in Leningrad and
Minsk designed to intimi-
date other Jews seeking
exit visas.

Meanwhile Dr. Boris
Azarnikoff, a 29-year-old
Jewish activist who served a
3 1/2 year sentence at the
Potma labor camp for al-
ledged "anti-Russian activi-
ties," joined his parents in
Israel.
In Washington, the House
Subcommittee on Postal
Service is investigating
charges that the U.S. Postal
Service is lukewarm in pro-
testing the failure of Soviet
authorities to deliver mail
sent by Americans to Rus-
sian Jews.
Rep. James M. Hanley
(D.-N.Y.), the subcommit-
tee's chairman, has re-
quested the postal service to
provide detailed informa-
tion on its action with Soviet
officials over the failure of
parcels and insured mail to
reach their destinations in
the Soviet Union.

The investigation stems
from the demand in a let-
ter to Hanley by Rep.
Joshua Eilberg (D.-Pa.)
that "our postal officials
should be doing everything
they can to get the Rus-
sians to deliver mail which
originates in this country
rather than giving up after
a minimum effort."
By seemingly "doing little

or nothing on behalf of U.S.
citizens who have been re-
fused" both the return of
their parcels or indeminifi-
cation for insured mail, Eil-
berg wrote Hanley, the
postal service„."in effect," is
"cooperating N,vith the Soviet
Union's policy of persecut-
ing its Jewish citizens."

Eilberg said that he had
forwarded complaints about
Soviet policy to the postal
service and had received in
reply "a copy of the regula-
tions which the Russians
are probably using to stop
delivery of the mail." He
added," "There is no evi-
dence of any attempt be-
yond a routine inquiry to
have the Russians deliver_
the mail."

Capitol sources familiar
with the matter told JTA
that the postal service has
similar problems with other
countries but they are
"twice as great" with the So-
viet service. The U.S. service
has "limited leverage," one
source said, that it can em-
ploy against the Soviet au-
thorities and even that
"modest leverage is severely
limited by the State Depart-
ment" because of its efforts
not to ruffle aspects of So-
viet-American detente.

If You Really
Care About

-

Your Thinning
Hair

CONVINCE
YOURSELF
TODAY

cliou'O be
Yad you did.

honeywell
barber
salon
Fo4Tailna:intifX

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