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February 14, 1975 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jews Would Count 150 Million Today

NEW YORK (ZINS) — The
world Jewish population now
numbers more than 14 million,
and had they enjoyed a normal
existence, their numbers today
should have been nearly 150
million.
Demographers say that 1975

w el

‘o e s-

,1 0 •eo lc

years ago, the entire world pop-
ulation numbered only 44 mil-
lion. At that time there were -a
million Britons, whose numbers
have•now grown to 47 million.
About 2,000 years ago there
were 6 million Egyptians, and
today there are 37 million. In all
of Europe there were an esti-
mated 15 million persons whose
numbers have now multiplied
to 470 million, and 2,000 years
ago there were 4 million Jews.
Most important is the 2,-
000-year-long exile, the po-
groms and assimilation,, which
have periodically cut down the
size of the Jewish population.

Just plain folks...

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—From Israel Digest

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Anti-Defamation League Book Has Israel as Teaching Base

NEW YORK — Social studies
in elementary and secondary
schools can be enriched with ex-
amples from Israel's experi-
ence, according to a new hand-
book published by the Anti-
Defamation League of Bnai
Brith.
Entitled "Israel: A Resource
Guide for Teachers of Social
Studies," it explores Israel's
geography, history, govern-
ment, economy, and society and
illustrates how "either by con-
trast or by analogy, the mate-
rial can illuminate standard
features of the curriculum" and
can also form the basis for an
entire unit on Israel in a course
on the Middle East.
Aimed at educators in both
elementary and secondary lev-
els, the booklet was written by
Jerome L. Ruderman, social
studies department chairman
at Simon Gratz High School,
Philadelphia, and an advisory
board member of Scholastic
Search magazine.
According to Ruderman,
the way Israel copes with its
arid climate could "illu-
minate such themes as 'Man
is influenced by his environ-
ment.' " He points out that Is-
rael's location on the land
route connecting Europe and
Asia with Africa is pertinent
to a world history course, and
that students learning about
urban development and so-
ciology "might wish to ex-
- plore further the planned
towns of the Negev and con-
sider as well international
efforts of city planners to de-
velop a town plan for Jerusa-
lem."
The suggestions -to instruc-
tors are contained in "To the
Teacher" sections following
each of the topics discussed. To
encourage further research, the
ADL pamphlet includes a se-
lected bibliography, a listing of
films on Israel available
through the ADL and other
sources of teaching materials.
Israel's history, both ancient
and modern, according to the
guide, could spur questions
such as, "Did the Jews in exile
remain a nation?" and "Can any
nation exist without a home-
land?"
Israel's story must necessar-

ily be tied with European his-
tory, the booklet notes, because
it was the Holocaust which
dramatized the need to estab-
lish a modern Jewish state. In
addition, a unit on current
events must also consider this
history if it includes the on-
going Arab-Israeli conflict.

The guide suggests -that
study of Israel's heterogenous
society "might shed light on
the general concepts of na-
tionalism, pluralism, assimi-
lation, and exogamous and
endogamous marriage," and
would fit well with ethnic and
urban studies as well as being

pertinent to American history
discussion of immigration and
civil rights.
"Israel: A Resouice Guide for
Teachers of Social Studies" is
available from ADL's national
headquarters, 315 Lexington
Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016, or
any of its regional offices.

Portions from Oldest Hagadda in Dropsie Archives

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The most ancient Haggada extant is among the many Hebraica treasures at The Dropsie
University in Philadelphia. Shown are several pages of this priceless Haggada manuscript of 20
pages, each 5 by 31/2 inches in size, that date back to the 8th Century and was originally found
in the Cairo Genizah. The Genizah, a concealed chamber, was unearthed late in the last century
at the Fostat (old Cairo) Synagogue in Egypt. The Haggada shows the Passover ritual in its early
state, the prayers and benedictions dating back to early talmudic times.

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