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January 31, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-01-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH- NEWS

Soviet Jews Blame Credits for Trade Pact Failure

(Continued from page 1)
with Soviet emigration prac-
tices and said he looked to
the Congress and the Admin-
istration to keep their com-
mitments concerning the link-
age. "I do not believe that
the Congress will respond to
t h e disappointing Soviet
move by abandoning its com-
mitment to help bring about
the freer movement of people
and ideas between east and
west, and I expect the Pre-
sident and the Secretary of
State to stand by their own
commitments embodied in
the October 18 compromise,"
Jacjn said.
on indicated that the
_,$300 lllion ceiling on loans
to the Soviet Union can, un-
_der existing law, be in-
- creased with congressional
approval but ue cautioned
that "Congress should not
abdicate its responsibility to
oversee the disposition of
U.S. credits, particularly to
the country whose policies re-
uire us to spend billions of
dollars for defense."
Jackson said he was issu-
ing the statement "to set the
record straight" because
Secretary Henry Kissinger's
Jan. 14 announcement that
the Soviet Union had decided
of to bring into force the
1972 trade agreement "had
given rise to confusion, spec-
ulation, and misunderstand-
ing: ,

His own position, Jackson
said, is that "genuine de-
tente requires freer move-
ment of peoples and ideas
and not just of machinery
and wheat. I continue to be-
lieve- that the economic pow-
er of the United States
should be pressed into the
service of human rights, and
I continue to believe that the
courageous men and women
lighting for their freedom in
he Soviet Union are worthy
of our support. I will not
abandon their cause, whether
under pressure from the
cold-hearted in Moscow or
_ the faint-hearted in Wash-
ington."
Jackson said he would con-
tinue to • support expanded
trade with the Soviet Union
despite its rejection of the
trade agreement and fore-
saw that ordinary commer-
cial trade might well con-
tinue to grow. "But the fact
is that to the Soviets the
'1972 trade agreement was
designed to bring not so
much of our trade, as our
aid—in the form of a huge
infusion of American capital
at subsidized interest rates,"
he said.
Detailing the history of the
trade law since the Jackson-
*Kissinger exchange of letters
Oct. 8, Jackson said that
"r
than saying plainly
tha
Soviets have re-
neged; the Administration
sought to blame the Congress
---and then to exploit t h e
Soviet action to inhibit the
Congress from playing its
constitutional role in estab-
lishing tariff and regulating
credits."
In New York, the joint

U.S.-Soviet Trade and Eco-
nomic Council has embarked
on a vigorous lobbying ef-
fort to increase Export-Im-
port Bank credits for the
USSR and divorce political
from economic issues in
trade relations between the
two countries.
Donald Kendall of the
Pepsico Co., American co-
chairman of the joint council,
said that "the breakdown of

the 1972 trade agreement"
was "only a temporary set-
back." He said the Ford Ad-
ministration is "pledged to
introduce and support vigor-
ously new legislation which
we consider an immediate
imperative."
He claimed that increased
exports to the USSR would
mean more jobs in America
where unemployment is on
the rise. He said U.S. De-

Cohen and Drachler Appointed
Federation Associate Directors

(Continued from Page 1)
In the past decade, the
Federation Apartments for
senior citizens at Ten Mile
and Greenfield have been
built, Prentis Manor has
been acquired as an addi-
tional facility for the care
of the dependent aged, and
the Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice-Community •Workship has
been able to procure larger,
more modern facilities. Con-
struction of a new Jewish
Community Center is now
under way at Maple and
Drake Roads, with plans for
the site which can be utilized
eventually by other Federa-
tion agencies.
Prior to his appointment
as assistant director of the
Detroit Federation in 1964,
Cohen had been executive
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Spring-
field, Massachutetts. He prev-
iously was assistant director
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation following an ear-
lier affiliation as a member
of the campaign and planning
staff of Detroit's Federation.
Cohen holds degrees from
the University of Maryland
and the University of Cincin-
nati and received his post-
graduate social work training
at Ohio State University's
school or social administra-
tion.
Drachler, who was raised
and educated in Detroit, has
been on the Federation staff
since 1957. He was super-
visor of the Jewish Parents'
Institute prior to that date.
His assignments at Federa-

tion have included the direc-
torship of the mercantile and
the real estate and building
trades divisions and the
supervision of the education
and community relations di-
visions and the committee on
capital needs.

partment of Commerce fig-
ures estimated that every
$15,000 worth of exports
generated one job.
Kendall also warned that
the U.S. would be losing
valuable Soviet business to
France, West Germany and
Japan which, he said, were
already far more generous
in their credit to Moscow.

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Galilee Exodus May
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JERUSALEM, (JTA) —
The growing exodus of Is-
raelis from towns and settle-
ments in Galilee may lead to
an Arab majority in that part
of Israel, according to an In-
terior Ministry document.
The document, prepared
as part of- the Ministry's gen-
eral plan for a national popu-
lation of four million by early
1980s, said there was a steady
Jewish emigration from Gali-
lee.
It cited as an example Ki-
ryat Shemona, founded in
1953, in which some 80,000
persons were settled. In 1965,
however, its population was
only 15,000. Kiryat Shemona,
near the Lebanese border,
has been the target of terro-
rist attacks in the past year.
The Interior Ministry re-
ported that many Jewish
youths leave their home
towns in Galilee, especially
after completing military ser-
vice, while Arab residents
show a much higher degree
of attachment to their home
'villages. The latest figures
show that Arabs constitute
49 percent of Galilee's popu-
lation.

Friday, January 31,1975—S

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