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December 20, 1974 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-12-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

RIT JEWISH N EWS
THE DETO
44—Friday, Dec. 20, 19 74

CCAR Publishes
New Pray•book

NEW YORK (JTA) —
"Gates of Prayer," described
as the first totally new pray-
erbook of the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis
since the Reform movement's
"Union Prayerbook" w a - s
published in 1894, has been
isued by the CCAR, the asso-
ciation of Reform rabbis.
CCAR officials said • the
new prayerbook was intended
'for worship on the Sabbaths,
weekdays and festivals. Its
publication follows by less
than a year a new union
hagada. The Reform liturgi-
cal revamping will be com-
pleted in about a year with
publication of "Gate of Re-
penance," a new High Holy
Day prayerbook still in manu-
script form.

-

HAL GORDON .

USSR Trade Passed,
Loan Pact in Trouble

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
The Senate last Friday ap-
proved by a vote of 77-4
the Administration's Foreign
Trade Bill after approving
the Jackson Amendment to
authorize trade 'concessions
to the Soviet Union in ex-
change for less restrictive
emigration policies, particu-
larly those applied to Soviet
Jews.
The bill contains a wide
range of provisions on tariffs
and new powers for the
President to act on foreign
trade- policies. It also would
clear the way for major re-
ductions in tariffs on pro-
ducts from the USSR and
other Communist countries
through most favored nation
status.
The amendment on emi-
gration was approved 88-0,
adding language which rati-
fies the understanding be-
tween the U.S. and the So-
viets on emigration.
The amendment will allow
the President to offer the

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Soviet Union most favored
nation status for a minimum
of 18 months if he certifies
that Soviet emigration pro-
cedures have been liberalized.
The emigration amendment
does not specify any figure
for emigration 'but Sen.
Henry M. Jackson (D. Wash.)
said during the debate pro-
ceeding the vote that if the
USSR adhered to its agree-
ment, the number of Jews
who would be able to emigate
during 1975 would top 60,000.
Jackson warned that "the
basis of trust and confi-
dence" essential to all U.S.-
Soviet relations would be de-
stroyed if the Soviets failed
to abide by their commit-
ments.
Meanwhile, the S e n a t e,
after having twice refused
to shut off debate, moved
towards recommitting the Ex-
port-Import Bank funding
legislation to the Senate-
House Conference Committee.
The legislation carries a
ceiling of $300 million in
loans to the Soviet govern-
ment over the next four years
as a monitor of its emigra-
tion practices which are con-
tained in the Trade Reform
Bill. I
Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger had asked' for a
free hand in dealing with
loans to the Soviet Union to
improve his diplomatic posi-
tion, but a majority in the
Senate insists on a ceiling.
This majority forced
the Senate-House Conference
Committee to adopt the ceil-
ing although the HOuse con-
ferees had objected.
The bill, which calls for
increasing the Ex-Im Bank's
lending authority from $20
billion to $25 billion over the
next - four years, faces- a
double hurdle of tough floor
fights when it comes out of
committee and time for en-
actment before the current
Congress adjourns.

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NEW YORK — The 1975
national conference on Jew-
ish camping, to be held for
the first time --irr Miami
'Beach, will take place Jan.
12-16 at the Deauville Hotel.
- Sponsored by the National
Jewish Welfare Board, the
American Association f o r
Jewish Education and the
Association of Full - Time
Jewish Camp Directors, the
conference is open to all di-
rectors and staff members of
camps under Jewish auspi-
ces.

Sessions will deal with cur-
r e n t legislation affecting
camps, the Jewish compon-
ent in camp programming,
the role of the, director and
training of the staff and the
uses of program and audio-
visual techniques in camp.

. .
••

Put your
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`Arab Wealth Must Help Refugees'

The following editorial is
reprinted from the New York
Times:
The United Nations Relief
and Works Agency, charged
with caring for displaced Pal-
estinian refugees and their
descendants for a quarter-
century, has received a new
three-year mandate in the
General Assembly Political
Committee, but faces a defi-
cit of $40 million in its $109-
million budget for the coming
year. -
Historically the U n ited
States has been the financial
mainstay of this open-ended
relief effort, contributing well
over half the funds that have
kept the agency alive.
In recent years the genuine
American humanitarian im-
pulse toward the refugees has
been increasingly offended as
ever more blatant political
and military uses have been
made of the UN camps, and
as extremist Palestinian fac-
tions have emerged with de-
structive force to thwart dip-
lomatic peacemaking efforts.
The question has frequently

3,000 Soviets

Help Syrians

JERUSALEM (JTA) — De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres
estimated that there were
3,000 Soviet troops in Syria,
some of them manning Syrian
positions.
Replying to questions in
the Knesset, the defense
minister said some Soviet
Troops served in anti-aircraft
missile systems near Damas-
cus and operated electronic
air defense systems in other
parts of Syria.
According to Peres,
Russians supplied Syria dur-
ing the Yom Kippur War and
afterwards, with more than
1,000 tanks, 300 jets, includ-
ing 50 of the new Mig-23s
and missiles reportedly cap-
able of reaching Israel's
three largest cities.
Peres reported that Egypt
recently received a shipment
of •Mirage jets direct from
France.
He said Egypt was due to
receive 36 Mirages altogether,
arranged by King Faisal of
Saudi Arabia on his visit to
France several months ago.
The transaction will be corn-
pleted in two years, Peres
said.

Certainly, no accumulation
of possessions can preserve
our well-being, except when
those around us share in our
wealth, too.

been raised whether the Uni-
ted States has any obligation
to perpetuate a social struc-
ture that is being used with
hostile intent against every-
thing this country is trying to
achieve for all the peoples of
the Middle East.
Recognizing the political
folly—to say nothing of basic
human inequity — of simply
walking away from a humani-
tarian program on which hun-
dreds of thousands of people
depend, the United States has
reluctantly pledged to con-
tinue its share of funding for
U.N.R.W.A. at approximately
the same rate as last year,
about $25 million.
But the contrast between
this figure and the contribu-
tions of the oil-producing
states is lamentable : last
year Saudi Arabia gave a
mere $650,000; Libya; $600,000
Kuwait, a minuscule $220,000.
The oil-rich regimes con-
tinue to make large payments
to the Palestine Liberation
Organization for building up
military potential and politi-
cal activity, apparently on

the 'assumption that the Uni-
ted States and Western Eur-
ope will take care of the hu-
man needs of the Palestinian
people who choose to stay in
the camps.
That assumption, which
may have had some rationale
in the past, is no longer justi-
fied after a generation of sup-
port. Around the world there
are many claims on this coin'-
try's humanitarian relief
funds, most of them having
fewer alternative sources of
support than the Palestinians.
Flushed with political pride
and endowed suddenly with
more liquid funds than they
can possibly handle for them-
selves, the oil-producing qb
states can no longer de ly
evade their share of res,_
bility for the well-being of the
refugees of- Palestine.

MICHAEL KAPLIT
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