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November 29, 1974 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, Nov. 29, 1974-25

NEW YORK (JTA) — The
plight of Jews in the Soviet
Union was likened to pre-
CARS TO BE DRIVEN Civil War slave practices in
the United States by a New
To any state. Also drivers furnished
York City official who re-
to drive your car anywhere.
Legally insured and I.C.C. licensed
cently returned from a visit
DRIVEAWAY SERVICE to the Soviet Union.
9970 Grand River •
Benjamin J. Malcolm, New
' Detroit, Mich. 48204
York City Corrections Com-
missioner, told a press con-
WE 1-0620-21-22
ference that just as slave
owners sold Black family

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Norman Allan & To.

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17540 WYOMING •

TEL.

Officer Hits PLO

'Russian Jews Are Slaves' Reports U.S. Visitior to USSR

341-1330 •

Mon. & Thurs. 9:30-7:00

Tues., Wed &
Sat • 10-5:30

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members to different parts
of the South, Soviet authori-
ties "have broken up fam-
ilies, permitting parents to
emigrate and withholding
permission for children, or
have allowed children and
loved ones to depart while
refusing visas to parents."
Eugene Gold, Kings Coun-
ty District Attorney and
chairman of the Greater New
York Conference on Soviet
Jewry, and New York attor-
ney Ezra G. Levin, took part
in the news conference.
Levin and Malcolm met
with Soviet officials in charge
of correctional institutions
and visited with Jewish ac-
tivists in Moscow, Lvov, Kiev
and Leningrad during their
two-week visit Oct. 28 to Nov.
11. Malcolm said that visits
with "refuseniks"—those de-
nied exit permits—had to be
held at night.
Malcolm said that if the
new U.S.-Soviet trade agree-

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ment, which links trade con-
cessions to the USSR with an
increase in the number of
Soviet emigrants and an end
to harassment of exit visa
applicants, is to have any
meaning, it must provide for
the restoration of communi-
cations, so that "refuseniks"
throughout Russia can tell
the West their stories of in-
timidation and harassment.
Without "continued publicity
in and pressure from the
West," no change will be
made in Soviet policy, they
said.
They reported that they
found their rooms searched,
their activities monitored
and the KGB secret police
outside the apartments of
several of the `refuseniks"
they visited.
Malcolm, a leading New
York black protestant, and
Levin, a Jew, attended _a
privately-held worship ser-
vice, allowed by authorities
after confiscation of prayer-
books and prayer shawls dur-
ing the past High Holy Days.
They said the congregation
of 15 men and one woman,
all 65 or older, begged them
to leave because they were
afraid of the government.
In a related development,
the Greater New York Con-
ference received an appeal
from R. Brizinov for his
brother-in-law, Albert Kultu-
nov of Chernovitz. Koltunov

was arrested last March 13
after he and his wife applied
for visas to rejoin their fam-
ilies in Israel.
Kultunov was accused of
-"spending millions of rubles"
and witnesses were employed
to provide false statements
against him. Two anonymous
letters, written in 1972 and
1973, were submitted by the
prosecution in Kultunov's
trial and witnesses testified
he had received bribes from
them to influence lottery
winnings.
Koltunov was a senior au-
ditor in the Vinnitsa depart-
ment of the Chernovitz sports
lottery office.
Brizinov said Koltunov had
no reason to accept bribes
because there was no way he
could influence lottery win-
nings and that the anony-
mous letters "were obvious-
ly fabricated" for the pur-
pose of intimidating Soviet
Jews wanting to go to Israel.
The trial began last June
3 with defense witnesses
barred from the courtroom
and a new attorney appoint-
ed to defend Kultunov on the
trial's opening day.
He was sentenced to five
years in a strict regime
camp for "economic crimes"
and his property was confis-
cated. Seeking an appeal, his
wife hired several lawyers
who were all denied access
to the evidence.

AMSTERDAM (JTA)—Maj.
Gerald C. Van Gorcum, a
retired Dutch officer who
served in the United Nations
truce observer force in the
Middle East in 1958-59, has
returned the decorations he
earned in that service in
protest against the appear-
ance of PLO chief Yasir
Arafat at the UN.
Maj. Van Gorcum, 63, de-
clared that Arafat's pres-
ence before the General As-
sembly was "an offense to
everybody who, like myself,
tried to promote peace in the
Middle East." He added that
"admitting this political play-
boy and gang leader to ad-
dress the UN is completely
unacceptable."

At the time of man's de-
parture from this world,
there are three who plead for-
him: his family, his money,
and his good deeds.

Classifieds Get Quick Risults

MORRIS
BUICK

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By MOSHE: RON
Jewish. News Special
Israel Correspondent
What happened at the first
performance of the famous
dancers of the Kirov _Ballet,
Valery and Galina Panov is
hard to describe. The 3,000
persons in Mann Auditorium,
including President Ephraim
Katzir and Mrs. Golda Meir
were Witness to a special art
event.
People were ready to pay
any price for this event.
Hundreds stood in front of
the hall—young and -old, sol-
diers and students — and
begged to be let in.
The dancers were applaud-
ed in a standing ovation.
Valery and Galina were
deeply touched by the warm
reception. With tears in their
eyes they were hardly able to
start their dances.
They danced scenes from
Tschaikovsky's "Nutcracker
Suite," "The Girl and the
Bandit" from Jhostokaririts,
"The Comedians" from the
Petrushka Suite from Stra-
vinsky. Panov's acrobatic
jumps were execucted with
the highest art. The audience
was completely taken in and
there were constant, stormy
waves of applause.
Valery looked as if he
would sail through the air.
His mimic was perfect and
his sinewy 'body seemed to
be naturally created for this
special acrobatic art.
Galina Panov has proved
that she is also a prima bal-
lerina. When the Panovs had
finished their program, the
audience applauded and
shouted, and threw flowers.
Panov said, "Never in our
life shall we forget this eve-
ning . ."
The Panovs have five per-
formances with the Israeli
Philharmonic Orchestra and
all tickets are -sold. They

AT MORRIS
BUICK

have succeeded in turning
their performances into a
big-demonstration for Russian
Jews, who are fighting for
their right to emigrate to
Israel.

mat vim- mei row

edalrill ■ Mar 'Mr

14500 W. 7 Mile

AT LODGE X-WAY

342-7100

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To: The Jewish News

Mile Rd
Suite 865

17515 W. 9

Southfield, Mich. 48075

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