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November 22, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6—Friday, Nov. 22, 1974

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Hebrew U. Plcints U.S. Resumes
Trees for Fallen
Algeria Diplomacy

JERUSALEM—In a cere-
mony attended by more than
1,000 people, a grove of trees
was planted on the Hebrew
University's Mount Scopus
campus in memory of the
University students, teachers
and employes who fell in Is-
rael's wars.
The event officially opened
the Hebrew University's 50th
academic year. The grove,
on the western slope of Mount
Scopus, will form part of a
green belt circling the, cam-
pus.

To Put It .Mildly, Business
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Her woes Oar

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Don't Miss it!

NORTgLAND

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
The State Department an-
nounced last week that the
U.S. and Algeria have re-
sumed formal diplomatic re-
lations.
Algeria was one of the
Arab states that broke diplo-
matic relations with . this
country during the Six-Day
War. The White House is
still considering whom to
name as ambassador to Alt
geria.
During the past seven
years Algerian interests in
Washington were handled by
Guyana, and Switzerland rep-
resented the U.S. in Algeria.
Iraq, which also broke dip-
lomatic relations with the
U.S. in 1967, and Yemen,
which broke relations in
1969, are now the only two
Arab countries that have no
diplomatic relations with the
U.S.

Families of. Israelis Murdered by Terrorists Meet Waldheim

UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
—The families of four Israe-
lis murdered by terrorists
under the command of Yassir
Arafat told United Nations
Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim Monday that "by wel-
coming the murderers of in-
nocent civilians into its midst,
the UN has abandoned what-
ever hope it once represented
for decency and morality in
international relations."
In a joint statement at a
news conference following
an interview with Waldheim

Airport on Alert
After Hijacking

TEL AVIV (JTA) — The
hijacking last week of a Jor-
danian airliner with 21 peo-
ple' aboard brought a high
alert at Ben-Gurion Interna-
tional Airport.
A watch was kept on the
airliner's movements until
Israel Radio reported that
the airliner landed at the
Benghazi Airport in Libya.

at his office here this morn-
ing, the survivors charge that
"appeasement of Yassir Ara-
fat in 11974 will fail to bring
peace just as appeasement
of Adolf Hitler failed a gen-
eration ago." •
Rabbi Israel Miller, chair-
man of the Conference of
Presidents of Major Ameri-
can Jewish Organizations
which is acting as the host
to the Israelis, quoted Wald-
heim as asserting that UN
Security Council Resolution
242 would be "the basis for
whatever solution is reached
through peaceful. negotia-
tions."
Those wha met with Wald-
heim in addition to Rabbi
Miller were: Dr. Benjamin
Berger of Cleveland; whose
son, David, was a member
of the Israeli Olympic team
at the 1972 games in Munich.
David, 28, was one of the 11
Israeli athletes seized at gun-
point and shot dead by Black
September terrorists; Morde-
cai Zarenkin, 31, an Israeli
war veteran whose wife and

two small children were
among the seven victims of
a terrorist raid on Nahariya
on June 24 in which Arafat-
led El Fatah publicly claimed
responsibility for the attack.
Also meeting with Wald-
heim were: Zippor'a Maimon,
15, and her brother Galil, 23,

Hebrew Schools
Honor 18 Leaders

NEW. YORK — Eighteen
communal leaders in. Hebrew
day school education in North
America were honored at
the 31st annual awards din-,
ner of Torah Umesorah, Na;
tional Society , for Hebrew
Day Schools in New York.
There are nearly 474
schools offering a combined
program of Hebrew and
general studies in 34 states
and five Canadian provinces
according to Torah Umeso-
rah's annual report.
Nearly 1,000 delegates and
leaders in the Jewish com-
munity, attended the dinner.

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Jewish Servicemen
to Get Hanuka Treat

WE SELL. WHAT WE ADVERTISE and HAVE IN STOCK

Remove all wheels and drums. Clean and in-
spect lining, inspect self-adjusters, repack front
wheel bearings.

of Ma'alot. Zippora w a s
wounded in the Arab terror-
ist raid on Ma'alot May 15
in which 24 Israeli school
children were killed.
Her brother., Galli, rescued
her from the schoolhouse
that had been seized by the
terrorists and carried her,
bleeding, to safety.
In a statement to the press
following the meeting, they
said: "We told Dr. Wald-
heim of our revulsion and
outrage at the standing ova-
tion which Yassir Arafat -re-
ceived following his speech
in this building last week. The
spectacle of the nations of
the world rising to acclaim
the murderer of
civilians was obscene e
But the prospect that he
be rewarded for his actions
by a UN resolution
him the territory he el
a depressing reminder - of the
world's folly in rewarding
Hitler with the Sudetenland
35 years ago.
"Peace in the Middle East
cannot come by surrender to
terrorists. Appeasement of
Yassir Arafat in 1974 will
fail just as 'appeasement of
Adolf Hitler failed a genera-
tion ago."

JEWISH

mmonni,

NEW YORK-The lights of
Hanuka will glow at U.S.
military installations all over
the globe for American serv-
icemen and their families
during Hanuka celebrations
made possible by the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board.
Festivities - begin at sun-
down, Dec, 8, when the first
candle of the Hanuka me-
nora will be kindled. Jewish
chaplains and Jewish mili-
tary lay leaders, endorsed
and served by the JWB
mission on Jewish Chaplain-
cy, will conduct holiday ob-
servances for their military
congregations and for Jewish
patients in Veterans Admin-
istration hospitals.
Throughout the eight days
of the holiday, children of
U.S. servicemen will be play-
ing with dreidles and un-
wrapping gifts such is Hanu-
ka igelt and other special holi-
day surprises sent by the
JWB Women's Organizations'
Services. Decorations, me-
noras, candles and refresh-
ments are aiso supplied by
Women's Organizations' Serv-
ices.
This Hanuka, special kosher
goods, religious materials and
gifts from JWB and the JWB
Women's Organizations' Serv-
ices have been sent to Jewish
military. families stationed
abroad — at more than 500
domestic military installa-
tions, at many bases over-;
seas, on Army transports
d
Navy vessels on the
seas, and for patients
hospitals.

Be not ashamed to learn
and to seek knowledge; be a
tail to the wise so that you
may become a head.
—Midrash

FUflO

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