100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 23, 1974 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-08-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.1 ■

20—Friday, August 23, 1974

L 1

! er, l;f•

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

o n g B'nai Israel
of Pontiac

Rabbi Leonard Berman Leon Sirlin,President

A' Conservative congregation with a Hebrew and
Sunday School, and active Youth Group and
Sist@rhood.

MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE

SEATS FOR HIGH HOLY DAYS

For Membership Phone
Stuart Allen
626-2234

Holiday Tickets
Nathan Crone
682-6508

CONG. B'NAI JACOB

20470 Hubbell,South of 8 Mile

Is pleased to announce that

Our Shul is open all year including all Holy Days.

As every year Holy Day prayers will be conducted by
well qualified liturgical Baalei-Tfilot.

We especially appeal to our neighboring fellow Jews
to join us in praying to the almighty for a happy and
peaceful K'Tovah Vachtimah Tovah in the year 5735
for our sisters and brethern the World over.

For reserved seats call at

Borenstein's Book Store

25242 Greenfield,Oak Park

or evenings call Ben Schraub, Sec'y. UN 4-7081

REGISTRATION STILL OPEN FOR THE

MISHKAN ISRAEL NURSERY

14000 W. 9 Mile Rd.

Oak Park, Mich.

PREPARATION FOR
ARTS & CRAFTS
KINDERGARTEN
MUSIC
TRANSPORTATION
JEWISH CUSTOMS
3 and 4 DAY SESSIONS

WE GIVE A FULL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
GEARED TO THE INTEREST OF
THE INDIVIDUAL CHILD

For More Information Please Call Mrs. Segal at

548-2666, 548-0446 eves.

ANNOUNCEMENT

Please attend with grateful appreciation

SUN., SEPT. 1 — 5:30 P.M.
"YISKOR" — MEMORIAL DAY

At Shaarey Shomayim
14200 10 Mile Road, Oak Park

For all 18,000 Jewish people killed by the Nazi's
in 1941 from: Sarney Woline, Bereznitzer, Dombro-
witz, Rokitno, Clesow and small towns.

Committee:
Harry Shlomper, Oak Park — Chairman
Meyer Terebelo
Pres., Bereznitzer Aid Soc., Oak Park
Boris Broder,
Mayer Broder,
Oak Park
Oak Park
Oscar Bakalar
Mrs. Mania Feldman
Oak Park
Oak Park
Harry Perelstein, Southfield

Ir,

MP to Visit Israel

Katz Analyzes Synagogue Architechture

on Occasion of Temple Beth El's Dedication

By IRVING I. KATZ
Executive Secretary,
Temple Beth El
The synagogue has been in
existence for well over 2,000
years—inscriptions from such
buildings have been found
dating from the Third Cen-
tury BCE in Egypt. With the
destruction of the Second
Temple in Jerusalem in 70
CE, syn-agogues have served
both as substitutes and out-
growths of that monumental
structure.
Synagogue architecture has
always been influenced by
the styles and the forms used
in its surroundings. Even the
appearance of the temple of
Solomon in Jerusalem was
undoubtedly subject to some
influence by Egyptians and
Phoenicians who helped build
it, while Herod's temple fol-
lowed a Graeco-Roman style.
The history of synagogue
architecture in America has
been a continuous search for
a meaningful expression of
the essence of the Jewish
house of worship.
A realization of Jewry's
"oriental" or Middle Eastern
roots resulted in synagogues
resembling mosques with
minarets. Ancient synagogue
excavation la Palestine in-
spired Graeco-Roman and
Byzantine style synagogues
which dotted the American
landscape in the late nine-
teenth and early twentieth
century.
There were several cur-
rents within the classical
trend. America possessed a
native classicism exemplified
by Thomas Jefferson's de-
sign for the University of
Virginia Library. Architect
Albert Kahn, a member of
Detroit's Temple Beth El,
built for his congregation in
1903 a graceful building with
an Ionic portico and a saucer
dome on Woodward and
Eliot, now the Bonstelle
Theater of Wayne State Uni-
versity. A magnificent build-
ing with an unpedimented
columnar portico was the
second synagogue designed
for Temple Beth El in 1922
on Woodward and Gladstone,
again by Albert Kahn.
During the depression and
World War II years, few
synagogues were built. The
postwar era, h o w e v e r,
brought a great number of
changes. - The historical styles
of the past century were re-
jected. Functional design' and
flexibility of plan were the
order of the day. Most of the
older synagogues were based
on rigid symmetrical and
geometrical forms with no
room for expansion. In the
postwar synagogues, social
halls and classrooms gained
greater importance in the
overall plan. Flexible walls
enabled the sanctuary to ex-
pand to meet the realities of
a large congregation at the
High Holy Days and a small-
et congregation the rest of
the year.
The postwar move to the
suburbs brought many
changes to synagogue build-
ing. Modern design seemed
well-suited to the suburban
landscape. Greater available
land meant more space for
gardens and landscaping and
parking lots.. Functionally,
the suburban synagogue be-
came a community center, a

,

school, as well as a place of
worship.
The prosperity of American
Jewry has been, apparent in
t h e postwar synagogues.
Many of the country's prom-
inent architects have design-
ed buildings for American
congregations, including Phil-
lip Johnson, Frank Lloyd
Wright, Minoru Yamasaki,
Walter Gropius and others.

IRVING I. KATZ

Their strutures and dozens of
others by lesser known archi-
tects have become part of the
American landscape. While
in many instances the archi-
tect may point to the Jewish
philosophies or symbols
which have inspired his de-
sign, the influence of modern

Temple Is Seeking
New Members

Temple Beth Jacob of Pon-
tiac will have a dinner party
for new and prospective
members 7:30 p.m. Sunday
at the home of Dr. and Mrs.
Leonard Schreier, 330 W.
Hickory Grove, Bloomfield
Hills.
Rabbi H. Philip Berkowitz,
spiritual leader of Beth Ja-
cob, will be present to ans-
wer questions on the con-
gregation.
For information, call the
temple, 332-3212, or Mrs.
Leonard Schreier, 338-0202.

Rosh Hashana Book
Printed for Families

NEW YORK — The Jewish
Information Council an-
nounced the publication of
"The Rosh Hashana Home
Reader.' The eight-page leaf-
free distribution in time for
RQsh Hashana, will include
a series of the more import-
ant prayers connected with
the worship service that are
especially suitable for family
reading at home. Rabbi Ru-
bin R. Donin, council chair-
man, edited and compiled
the publication.
For a copy send a stamped,
self-addressed envelope to
Rabbi Donin, POB 11, Law-
rence, N.Y. 11559.

Libya's Qaddafi Calls
Israel 'Paper Tiger'

JERUSALEM — Libya's
Col. Qaddafi was interviewed
by the Lebanese magazine
"Al Usbu Al Arabi," and
described Israel as a "paper
tiger." Qaddafi said the
Arabs could destroy Israel in
12 hours if they adopted a
sound strategy.

RIGHT FORMULA
The young man who has a
deep seated faith in himself
has a bright future ahead of
him.

architesture on synagogue
design is certainly stronger.
In September, 1973, Tem-
ple Beth El moved from
Woodward and Gladstone in
Detroit to its new facilities
in the suburbs, on Telegraph
and 14 Mile Rds., in Birm-
ingham. The extraordinary
feature of the large complex,
designed by Minoru Yama-
saki and built by the A. J.
Elkin Construction Co., is the
magnificent tent-like, seven
story high, sanctuary, sym-
bolizing the Ohel Moed (tent
of meeting) used by the
ancient Israelites during
their journey through the
wilderness to the Promised
Land.
A series of events will
mark the dedication of the
new synagogue. The dedica-
tion service will be held
Sept. 6, with Rabbi
Alfred Gottschalk, president
of Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Instittite of Religion,
as guest preacher. Admis-
sion to the Friday night serv-
ice will be by ticket only.
This will be followed by a
dedication service on Sat-
urday morning, with
Rabbi Richard C. Hertz
preaching the sermon, when
a creative worship service,
specially composed for the
occasion by the Young Peo-
ple's Society, will be used.
The dedication banquet will
be held 7:30 p.m., Sept. 7.
The concluding event will
be an open house for the
community. 2-5 p.m., Sept. 8.

LONDON (JTA)—Edward
Short, MP and deputy Lead-
er of the Labor Party, has
accepted an invitation to visit
Israel in September. Short
has also accepted an invita-
tion from the Egyptian gov-
ernment to visit Egypt some
time this year.

Afraid of the High Cost
Of TV Repairs??
Call

Ron Schultz
543-031_4

experienced reliable
For
service at reasonable prices.
No charge for in home esti-
m ates.

For Custom Drapery
Cleaning, Call

DRAPERY CLEANERS

"All That The Nome Implies"

We Also
Wash & Finish
Drip Dry Curtains
Professionally

WE DO ALL THE WORK
REMOVE AND INSTALL

891.1818

Suburban Call Collect

Reverse Charges

HARRY THOMAS

FINAL CLEANUP
SUMMER CLOTHING
SPORT COATS & SUITS

Reg. $725 to $250

$49.50 to $1 19.50

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE OPEN SUNDAY 11 to 4

HARRY THOMAS

Fine Clothes for Over 38 Years

24750 Telegraph at 10 Mile

Daily to 6 P,M. Thurs. to 8 P.M.

4•11111111 ■

SHOWER GIFTS

Everything You Could Imagine
COME IN AND
SEE FOR YOURSELF

.41111.111 ■

9 MILE & COOLIDGE, OAK PARK CENTER

Owned by Nellie Freedman
We Carry A Large Selection of
MODERN & TRADITIONAL

LAMPS — TABLES — WALL DECOR

We Also Have a Complete
Gift Selection for Every Decor.

Open Daily 9:30 - 5:30

545-1410

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan