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July 26, 1974 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

C

atering • by
G ei

I

The Ultimate in Catering

With A Yiddish Tamm

For ALL Occasions

Elegant Pastries — Outstanding Hors D'oeuvres
Dinners with A Distinctive Flair
Unique Meat and Dairy Trays
Hall Available
541-7940

.543-3585

;




Shaft:We* awry Club
For All Occasions

Call Our

Banquet Manager

at-

682-4300

We Cater for

All

Occasions—Seating for 400

American Student Entertainers Leave Grateful Israeli Wounded

JERUSALEM — For. nine
American students who have
been entertaining wounded
soldiers all over Israel since
the Yom Kippur War, the
time has come to say goodby
and head for home.
They leave behind thou-
sands of loyal fans in army
bases and hospitals all over
the country.
The group was formed
spontaneously last fall when
Yoram Loewenstein, coun-
selor for members of, the
one-year study program for
overseas students at the He-
brew University, got wind of
the musical talents of several
of the students, and arranged
for them to give a campus
performance.
That original performance,
however, never took place.
The Yom Kippur War broke
out three days before the

JEWISH NATIONAL
FUND

Comfort 6 17e,
Comfort `Ye,
c71/1.r People

J.N.F. land supports the whole Israel economy — it grows Israel's food

— on it stands Israel's religious, educational, and welfare institutions —

and it guards her frontiers.

scheduled concert, and Yo-
ram was sent with an ar-
tillery unit to the Golan
Heights.
Upon his release soon after
the cease fire, Yoram and his
young American students de-
cided to -try a little cheering-
up program of their own.
They spent four days putting
together a new arrangement
of popular American and Is-
raeli tunes and then, with
permission of the army, per-
formed for wounded soldiers
in Jerusalem's Hadassah-
University Hospital.
The students made such a

Hike Seen in Student Counseling
at Hebrew U. Since October War

JERUSALEM — Nine

months have passed since the
Yom Kippur War, and the
emotional and personal prob-
lems of demobilized soldiers
who are students at the He-
brew University still surface.
Whether they are disturbed
by sleepless nights, problems
of concentration or a re-
assessment of their life goals,
students are seeking and find-
ing help from the university's
3 1/2-year-old student counsel-
ing services.
Dr . D o v Friedlander,
Canadian - educated director
of the service, said that dur-
ing the war the case load
dropped dramatically. "Stu-
dents were too involved in
the war or felt too guilty
about expressing certain per-
sonal problems at that time."
During the war period, the
14 s t a f f •members of the
counseling service worked
actively as clinical psycholo-
- gists for the army, and fe-
male staffers assisted widows

Tisha b'Av is the time when the Jews' thoughts turn to the destruction of

the temple. Yet this is also the time to think of the reconstruction and

the upbuilding of the privilege of witnessing the beginning of the

redemption of our ancestral national home and of the Holy City of
Jerusalem.

Pekeris Gets
Vetlesen Prize

MAKE YOUR CONTRIBUTION

TO THE

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

MORE GENEROUS THIS TISHA b'AV

You who have in the past been contributors to J.N.F., can justly be proud.

J.N.F. played a vital part in the establishment of the State of Israel.

J.N.F. played a vital part in the' building of the State of Israel.

Now, you can help J.N.F. RESTORE the settlements and establish new

ones ; REBUILD the roads and construct new ones ; REPLANT the trees and
plant hundreds of thousands of new trees.

J.N.F. played a vital part in the protection of the State of Israel. And
now, J.N.F. is playing a vital part in the winning of the peace for the
State of Israel.

THOSE NOT ATTENDING THE SYNAGOGUES
ARE REQUESTED TO SEND THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS
TO THE OFFICE OF THE

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

22100 Greenfield

Oak Park, Mich. 48237

968-0820

KEREN K AYEIME T H LE ISRAEL

Contributions to JNF Are Tax Deductible

hit that they soon found them-
selves performing at least
once a week before all kinds
of audiences in all parts of
the country. They perform-
ed on Israeli TV and before
large audiences, but Susan
Pulman of San Antonio, one
of the vocalists, said "For us,
just singing in a hospital for
a small group is the best."
Once they were taken to
the Sinai Desert to perform.
"There wasn't a soul in sight,
and then, all of a sudden,
soldiers started to appear
from nowhere, gathering all
around us."

As a reward for that per-
formance, the students were
taken across the Suez Canal.
One number in the group's
routine is a Swahili song
which blond flutist Don Ross-
off of St. Paul mirthfully
teaches to the audiences.
That song became the an-
them for the Sinai reservists
and, when the students were
invited back for a return en-
gagement, the soldiers came
swarming out to meet them,
singing the Swahili melody.
The Jewish Agency offered
the group a chance to per-
form at college campuses in
the U.S., but the students
turned them down.
"We come from all corners
of the United States and,
though we'd love to stick to-
gether, it would just be too
difficult," said Ed Rosen-
baum of Rockville Centre,
New York, who plays the
clarinet in the group. "It's
sad that the year is over, but
it's been a great experience."

and civilians. Since returning
to the university in Decem-
ber they have faced a 30 per
cent increase in stud en t s
seeking help.
Students needing immedi-
ate care were demobilized
soldiers under post-traumatic
shock, or battle fatigue. Al- THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
though these students who
Friday, July 26, 1974-15
had been in heavy combat
situations received psychi-
atric treatment from the
army, they encountered new
pressures in academic life
and were given top priority
Or An
by Dr. Friedlander's staff.
Occasional
Flower
The service also provides
continuing therapy started in
Call
the army for wounded stu-
dents and those with psy-
chological problems associ-
Manager
ated with loss of limbs or
other disabilities.
Less severe, but significant
Designer/Decorator
complaints come from a wide-
from New York
spread group` of students
who, according to Dr. Fried-
lander, "in the light of ex-
perience in war, began to
Birmingham's leading florist
question t h e i r ambitions,
DETROIT'S MOST
values and life plans."-
CREATIVE TRIO
There has been an upsurge
• WEDDINGS
.in requests for vocational ad-
• BAR MITZVAS
vice and career planning. In
• SHOWERS
addition, Dr. Friedlander
• PARTIES
suspects that many students
have dropped out of the uni- CALL ANY DAY - ANYTIME!
versity because of such re-
direction or confusion.
Couples also are asking
and receiving advice. Many
young women w h o s e hus-
bands were mobilized are
talking out their problems
together in group therapy.
The student counseling
services, which are free to
all students and their spouses,
were widely publicized on
campus and as a result, most
of the cases have been self-
referred, except for the more
traumatic cases which have
been transferred directly by
the army.

Flowers For
Every Occasion
...

Fern Kumove

Phil Henshaw

Jerry Mickowski

MI 6-7272

The Weizmann Insititute's
Chaim Leib Pekeris, a spe- AN
cialist on the earth's, vibra-
tions during seismological
disturb ances, has been ti
awarded this year's Vetlesen
Prize, "the Nobel prize of r 10
the earth sciences." The
award, announced by the 'M
president of Columbia Uni-
versity, carries with it a
It;
grant of $25,000. He has
been in Israel since 1948.

•.•.4 IP:PAM/0

BUICK-OPEL-HONDA N;

IS STILL
rtlYOUR BEST BUY



Mayhew Quits Labor

TAmitRoFF

A9
11.711 P.M I MINT, OP.

LONDON — Pro. Arab
Member of Parliament Chris-
topher Mayhew has broken A
So.of12Mile
with the British Labor Party
.
Across
from
The
TEL-12
MALL
and joined the Liberals. He 313
said that Labor had become
"too vulnerable to the ex-
treme left and too dependent
b;.
t;1 11,:611 11 ■ WIV404 le. .VW' '4
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