100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 28, 1974 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

U. S. Congressmen Protest Repression of Soviet Jews

(Continued from Page 1)
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy
urged Mr. Nixon to press for
t'open doors for Soviet Jews."
Kennedy described his recent
midnight meeting with Soviet
activists on his visit to Mos-
cow. "After listening to them,
I bring you a message," he
told the crowd. "They remain
committed to their ideal.
They remain firm in their
faith. And they remain de-
termined to live in Israel in
freedom."
Israel's Foreign Minister
Yigal Allon told the ICnesset
Tuesday night that Israel
had "reason to hope" that the
United States would raise the
issue of Soviet Jewry "at the
highest level" during the
summit conference in Mos-
cow.
He said the issue hvl been
discussed with President
Nixon during his recent visit
here, and t h,e r e were
"grounds for assuming" that
the appeal "had not fallen on
deaf ears."
Anon, who is also deputy
premier, was responding to
motions by Likud on the
stepped-up harassment of
Jewish activists in advance
of the Nixon visit to Moscow.
The Zionist General Coun-
cil sent President Nixon a
cable asking his intervention.
Nuclear physicist Andrei D.
Sakharov on Monday in Mos-
cow urged _President Nixon
and Leonid I. Brezhnev to
take up the issues -of free
emigration and free exchange
of information in their talks.
He asserted the importance,
of "the freedom of emigra-
tion and return" for all per-
sons, as set out in Article 13
of the United Nations Gen-
eral Declaration of Human
Rights.
In another communication
to President Nixon, Harold
Ostroff, president of the
Workmen's Circle, assured
him that "No Soviet Jew
poses a threat to your visit"
to Moscow. "Reports that So-
viet Jews are being corralled
and imprisoned during your
stay should evoke strongest
protests from you."
Reports over the weekend
that the Soviet government
was prepared to guarantee in
writing to allow 45,000 Jews
to emigrate annually to Israel
failed to receive confirmation
at the White House, the State

Department, or in the Senate.
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry and the Great-
er New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry reacted to the
reported 45,000 per annum
quota offer with disdain. The
Soviets are "playing a cyni-
cal numbers game with hu-
man lives," said a joint state-
ment issued by Jerry Good-
man and Malcolm Hoenlein,
the executive directors of the
national and New York
groups.
The fact that the Russians
may have advanced a quota
is an admission by the So-
viets "that countless Jews
are eager to leave the
USSR," the statement said.
It added, "In principle, we
are strongly opposed• to
negotiations based on num-
bers rather than on human
rights. Our goal is total and
free emigration."
(According to reports
reaching London from Soviet
Jewish activists, the quota
promise given Kissinger, if
true, would not solve the
problem because it would be
filled by Jews from the Baf-
fle states, Georgia and Mol-
davia, who presently receive
visas while Jews in MoScow
and Leningrad would still be
unable to get them.)
The reports said that Kiss-
inger on June 6 discussed
the alleged Soviet offer with
Sens. Henry M. Jackson (D.
Wash.), Abraham Ribicoff
(D., Conn.) and Jabob K.
Javits (R. N.Y.).
Aides to those senators
said at the time that "some
movement" was indicated by
the Soviet government
through Kissinger toward re-
laxing its emigration policy
and that they had asked
Kissinger to discuss the
matter further with the So-
viets. They refused to discuss
"numbers."
Some senatorial sources
suggested that the reported
Soviet offer of 45,000 was de-
liberately leaked at this time
by the State Department
sources to create a situation
which would indicate to the
Soviet leaders that the Nixon
administration is doing its
utmost to kill the Jackson
Amendment.
A number of Soviet Jewish
activists have been given
permission to emigrate to Is-
rael before President Nixon

Limited Number of Openings
Still Available For

Day Camp and Nursery

Mishkan Israel Lubavitcher Center

-14000 W. 9 MILE RD.
Oak Park, Mich.

You can now register your son or daughter
in our

DAY CAMP

Monday - Thursday 1-4

Ages 3-6

Air Conditioned Play Area — Outdoor Play-
ground Area — Snacks — Trips —
Transportation — Individual Attention
Cheapest Rates In Michigan

Call Mrs. Fraidel Segal

at 548-2666 or 548-0446

arrives in Moscow, the Stu-
dent Struggle for Soviet
Jewry reported.
They include Boris Ruben-
shtein, 49, a Leningrad phy-
sicist; Itzhak Goitberg, 46,
Kishinev mathematics pro-
fessor; Alexander Galich, 55,
of Moscow, composer of sa-
tiric songs widely circulated
"underground" in Russia;
and Alexander Korotukov of
Kiev, a screenwriter.
In other developments, a
group of activists who staged
a demonstration in Red
Square were picked up by
the militia. In Kishinev, 25
Jews staging a vigil were
detained and later released.
In Kiev, Vladimir Kisyluk, a
night' watchman at a marina,
was beaten up at work.
Anna and Yuri Berkovsky
went on trial in Novosibirsk
Tuesday on charges of -pos-
session of weapons and cur-
rency speculation.
In Mexico City, the Soviet
Embassy for the first time,
accepted a petition on behalf
of a Jewish prisoner in the
USSR.
The petition, asking free-
dom for Sylva Zalmanson,
who is serving a 10-year sen-
tence, was brought to the
embassy on the fourth anni-
versary of the first Lenin-
grad hijack trial by a delega-
tion of Jewish women.
In New York, about 40 stu-
dents demonstrated for two
hours June 18 outside Lincoln
Center where the Moiseyev
Dance Company of Moscow

-

opened its current U. S. tour.
Hungarian Rabbinical
Seminary Awaits
Students From Russia
BUDAPEST (JTA) — Ten
Soviet Jews have been au-
thorized to come to Hungary
to study at the Budapest
Theological Seminary, ac-
cording to '-unconfirmed re-
ports here.
If the reports prove to be
true, the total - of 12 students
currently attending the sem-
inary would be raised to a
record high of 22 students.
The seminary now counts
two Soviets among its stu-
dents, Chaim Levitish, 20, of
Moscow, and Adolph Chae-
vitch, 20, of Birobidzhan.
Hungarian Jewish commu-
nity leader Geza Seifert told
the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that while in New
York recently, he had been
informed of the news by an
American r a bb i, Arthur
Schneir of New York.
He said, however, that
Hungarian officials had not
yet confirmed the informa-
tion.
There is no indication as
to when the Soviet rabbinical
students might be expected
to arrive in Hungary, and
there is some speculation
that their final number may
be less than the announced
10.
Seifert said he expected to
find out more details on the
subject during a trip to Mos-
cow. During his Moscow
visit, the Jewish leader said

Call Goes Through: Rabbi's Wife
Telephones Soviet Jewish Famtly

"Operation Interference"
made a major breakthrough
last week as a Detroiter —
one of .a few persons through-
out the U. S. — reached a
Soviet Jew by telephone. A
Soviet campaign is under way
to disconnect the telephones
of its Jewish citizens.
Participating in the project
of the Detroit Action Com-
mittee .for Soviet Jewry,
Sarah Gorrelick, wife of
Rabbi Benjamin H. Gorre-
lick, rabbi emeritus of Cong.
Beth Achim, contacted Shaul
Goldblatt, father of Mikhail
Goldblatt, a Hebrew teacher
and mathematician.
"The experience shook me
to no end," she said. "It's
something I'll always re-
member."
Mrs. Gorrelick made the
call to Russia by using a
fictitious name, Mary Brown,
as the participants in the
project were instructed. After
a four-hour wait, the over-
seas operator came on the
line with the call.
"I almost forgot that I was
Mary Brown and not Sarah
Gorrelick,"_she said.
When the call was put
through, she identified her-
self in Yiddish. "I am Mary
Brown, a Jew from the
United States. I bring greet-
ings from all of the Jews in
the United States."
She asked for the younger
Goldblatt, but he was not at
home, so she spoke to his
father. Mrs. Gorrelick_ said
he "was eager to talk."
She conversed with the
elder Goldblatt for about 10-
12 minutes, during which he
kept repeating the - word
"please" as if making an
appeal.
She said he thanked her

several , times during their
talk and "didn't want to
hang up the phone." How-
ever, Mrs. Gorrelick said,
there was fear in his voice.
Near the end of the con-
versation, Rabbi Gorrelick
got on the line and blessed
Goldblatt in Hebrew and
Yiddish. Mrs. Gorrelick end-
ed the conversation with a
wish that this year he reach
Jerusalem.
Among the participants in
the project was Alan Rosen-
berg, chairman of the De-
troit Action Committee for
Soviet Jewry.

NEVER FORGETS
No man learns the right
way so quickly and well as
the one who has once been
misled.

Speeding across intersec-
tions is bad business,
motorists.

18—Friday, June 28, 1974

he will attend a ceremony in
Don't give up just because
honor of the Soviet commu- you happen to be down.
nity leader, Efroim Grigorie-
vich Kaplun, who is cele-
brating his 80th birthday.
WAKE UP YOUR
The Budapest Theological
WARDROBE .
Seminary is the sole institu-
tion of its kind still operating
in Eastern Europe and there-
men's
fore must serve a wide
radius. However, apart from
clothe s
the two Soviet students, there
with
are no
foreigners at-
tending the
the school.
the
Valery Panov Claims
wok-
Atheism but Loves Israel
JERUSALEM — Ballet
.
of
dancer Valery Panov, now
living in Israel after winning
his two-year struggle to emi-
grate from the Soviet Union,
admitted that he and his
Gentile wife, Galina, are
atheists.
He would not say whether PI W I ITH AN wilt
his wife would convert to X-CEPTIONAL STORES FOR MEN
Judaism, but he added: "We
love this country and one of TEL-12 MALL, SOUTHFIELD
phone 158-4420
the reasons of our love to-
ward Israel is because the UNIVERSAL MALL, WARREN
phone 75 1 -1100
people here love God so beau-
tifully and purely."

plia V r

SPRINKLER

SYSTEMS

• INSTALLED
• SERVICED

Installations with
NO Sod Damage

RANABlita

Professional Installers

CALL US FOR A FREE
INSTALLATION ESTIMATE

559-5595
ALLIANCE SPRINKLER CO.

"THE SPRINKLER SPECIALISTS"

17061 JEANETTE

SOUTHFIELD, MICH.

PACKER • PONTIAC

STILL THE WORLD'S LARGEST

BIG
DISCOUNTS
ON ALL

IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY

Free Loaners

Come In

NOW

MILT LEVIN
Call 363-9300

RED STOTSV-
Call 863-93%,

18650 LIVERNOIS, SOUTH OF SEVEN

AMERICAN INDIAN JEWELRY SALE

50% DISCOUNT ForcBoeTteSEetytion

SINGER

SIGNED PIECES
* BOLOS *
SQUASH * BELT BUCKLES *
* ZUNI *
BLOSSOMS * NECKLACES *
* RINGS *
* FETISHES *
* BRACELETS * HIESHE

• LIQUID SILVER . . . $15 per Strand
• ZUNI INLAY BRACELETS
$27
Were $78, NOW

SPECIAL QUANTITY PRICES

We'll Beat Any Price
or Give You

5 FREE ARROWS

97 RINGS, BRACELETS
AND EARRINGS
Navajo Jewelry

Value $15 - $40
I r‘
;1oCh.oice
LS EACH
NOW
.

SQUASH BLOSSOMS
Large Nuggets

Reg. $400-$600 Value

4

ONLY . . $250 EACH

THURS. June 27 till 9 p m.
FRI. June 28 Noon till 9 p.M.

SHIAWASSEE HOTEL

17 TURQUOISE & SILVER

LARGE BRACELETS

Reg. $60 to $90

t y lo8.);v Cho . ice .

$ 27

SAT. June 29 10 a.m. till 9 p.m.
SUN. June 30 11 a.m. till 6 p.m.

1 701 7 W. 9 Mile Road

1/2 blk. east of Southfield

um4

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan