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May 31, 1974 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-05-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

12—Friday, May 31, 1974

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Technion Develops Moisture
Barrier for Farming Sand Dunes

TEL AVIV — The vast
sandy wastelands of Israel
and northern Sinai can be
turned into highly productive
farms by the use of a sub-
surface a s ph a It moisture
barrier developed by agricul-
tural engineers at the Tech-
nion-Israel Institute of Tech-
nology in Haifa.
At a conference of scien-
tists and agriculture officials,
Dr. Gedalyahu Manor of
Technion's Lowdermilk Fac-
ulty of Agricultural En-
gineering, who headed the
project, said that the new
method permits intensive
growing of high-profit vege-
tables and fruits on leveled
sand dunes and sandy soils.
The latter were considered
virtually useless because ir-
rigation water would quickly
seep beyond the reach of the
plants roots. It saves both
water and fertilizer and
yields larger crops, he noted.
The Technion engineers de-
veloped a tractor-drawn im-
plement with an 8-foot wide
wedge-shaped sweep which
travels beneath the sand. As
it travels, it lifts the sand a
few inches while nozzles on
its underside spray a cold
asphalt emulsion into the
cavity created by its passage.
The sand falls back into
place and the asphalt hard-
ens immediately into a
moisture-proof membrane Vs
inch thick.
On successive passes
across an area of leveled
sand, the implement lays
down a series of eight feet
wide strips of asphalt, which
either overlap one another or
are separated by short
spaces if minor drainage is
desired.
Prof. Haim Finkel, dean
of Technion's faculty of agri-
cultural engineering, noted
that the importance of this
new method is that it enables
profitable farming of areas
which the government is in-
terested in settling for politi-
cal and social reasons.

In small-scale experiments
performed at Caesarea and
Kiryat Haim using the
asphalt moisture barrier,
substantial yields were pro-
duced. At Caesarea 2.9 tons
of potatoes per dunam (1/4
acre) were produced. com-
pared with only 1.50 tons per
dunam on an adjoining plot
of land not having the
barrier.
At Kiryat Haim, tomatoes
were grown and the yields
from the plot over the asphalt
barrier were 48 per cent
higher than over a control
plot.
Prof. Finkel said this new
method need not be limited
to Israel. Vast areas of the
world which have sandy
soils and limited water sup-
plies include the west coast
of South America, the Per-
sian Gulf area and the bulk
of North Africa with its
Sahara Desert.
Similar research has been
going on in the United
States, at Michigan State
University and the American
Oil Co. of Indiana (Amoco).
The American process is de-
signed for sandy soils rather
than pure sand dunes and
uses hot asphalt rather than
the cold bitumenous emulsion
employed in the Technion
method.
The Technion equipment
and process were developed
independently after repeated
requests for information to
the Michigan State scientists
were not answered.

161 Hebrew U. Law
Students Get Degrees
JERUSALEM—Bachelor of
law degrees were awarded
to 161 students of the Law
faculty of the Hebrew Uni-
versity in ceremonies ad-
dressed by Justice Joel Suss-
man, permanent deputy
president of the Supreme
Court.

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"Victims of Ma'alot Massacre

JERUSALEM (JTA) — The following are the
names, ages and residences of those who were
slaughtered by three Arab terrorists on May 15 in
Ma'alot:
Aviva Sada, 15, 1Vloshav Elifelet; Yonah Sabag,
15, Tzvia Mor-Yosef, 15, Shoshana Cohen, 17, Yoche-
ved Mazoz, 15, Tamar Dahan, 16, Rachel Afuta, 16,
Ilana Neeman, 17, Yehudit Madar, 16, Yaacov Ka-
bala, 17, Yaacob Levy, 17, Rina Cohen, 15, Sarah Ben-
Shimon, 15, Sarah Madar, 15, Sarah Cohen, 15, Malka
Amrusi (age not available), Yaffa Cohen (age not
available), and Sarah Sofer, 5, all of Safed.
Nili Morad, 16, and Michael Sitruch, 17, both
of Hatzor, and Ilana Turgman, no age and residence
given. In addition were the three members of the
Cohen family in Maalot, Yaakov, 50, Fortuna, 40,
Elie, 4.
Private First Class Zerach Salvian, 21, of Ma'alot,
was killed by the terrorists' sniping during the time
the children were held as hostages in the school.

Hebrew U. Researchers Seek
to Save Quail From Extinction

JERUSALEM — Ecology
researchers in the zoology
department of the Hebrew
University are involved in an
intensive effort to preserve
the quail as a species.
Within the framework of
the university's extensive re-
search work in' the Sinai, in
fields ranging from archeo-
ology to agriculture and hy-
drology, ecology researcher
Yehiel Zuckerbrot, graduate
student in zoology, is now in
the second year of a long-
term project to study the
questions of quail, ecology
and behavior.
Every year, as they finish
the first lap of their migra-
tory flight from their summer
breeding grounds in Europe
to their winter refuge just
south of the Sahara, flocks
of quail drop exhausted on
the Sinai coast after having
crossed the Mediterranean.
Flying low over the coast at
daybreak, they fall into the
nearest bushes, an easy prey
to unscrupulous hunters.
About a 100 years ago, the
bushes were a safe refuge
where they rested until night-
fall before resuming their
southward flight. But then
the development of commer-
cial networks made it fea-
sible to ship quail back to
E u r op e, and local Sinai
Arabs began netting the ex-
hausted birds.
Until recently, nets stretch-
ed from Gaza to Cairo
throughout the migratory
period (end of August to
early October), trapping all
but the luckiest birds. While
netting methods improved in
efficiency, the number of
quail caught decreased dras-
tically, from well over 1,000,-
000 in 1908 to 150,000 in
1967.
Under the direction of Dr.
Uriel Safriel, Hebrew Uni-

Amsterdam Event
Gets Hebrew Name
AMSTERDAM (J T A) —
The large-scale celebrations
of Amsterdam's 700th anni-
versary to be held next year
will be named "Mokum 700,"
the Hebrew word for place.
Mokum is a popular name
for Amsterdam, a favorite
place of Jews over the cen-
turies. During the Nazi oc-
cupation, 70,000 Jews were
deported from Amsterdam to
extermination camps.
A special medal with the
engraving "Mokum 700" is
to be struck for the celebra-
tion.

versity Senior Lecturer in
ecology, Zuckerbrot is in-
vestigating questions such as
how the quail know what
time of night to leave Eur-
ope in order to arrive in
Sinai exactly at daybreak,
what- exhausts them, how
well they s u r v i v e under
desert conditions and how
they spend their Sinai so-
journ.•

Dr. Safriel and Zuckerbrot
are sponsored by the Na-
tional Council for Research
and Development of the Is-
rael Prime Minister's Office,
which is more concerned
with questions of population
dynamics and management.
Quail are a potentially im-
portant export item for Is-
rael; they provide a valu-
able source of protein, their
trapping is a source of em-
ployment for the Sinai Arabs;
and their export price could
bring high added value for
the government.

Boxers Devote U.S. Tour to Ma'alot Slain

NEW YORK (JTA) — The cabi youth movement in the
United States Maccabi Asso- U.S. and to the Maccabi
ciation announced that the Tzair youth in Israel.
vist to the U.S. of the Mac-
cabi National Boxing Team
of Israel has been dedicated
to the memory of the "youth
of Israel" massacred in the
town of Ma'alot.
Or An
Sidney D. Young, president
Occasional
Flower
of the USMA, urged the
American community to sup-
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• BAR MITZVAS
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tional AAU boxing team in
• PARTIES
each of four cities: New ,CALL ANY DAY — ANYTIME!
York, June 17, Miami Beach,
June 20, Dallas, Texas, June
27. A fourth city is yet to be
selected.
Young said all proceeds
will be directed to the Mac

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