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May 24, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Urgent Knesset Meeting Today Acts on Disengagement

fully steering clear of any
description or classification
of the American "ideas."
Some sources said these were
essentially Israeli ideas
which Kissinger represented
to Assad as American for
face-saving purposes. Accord-
ing to unofficial reports, the
tentative agreement shapes
up as follows:
Israel will return to Syria
all of the Syrian territory it
captured in the Yom Kippur
War last October. will evac-
uate some Syrian territory
captured in the 1967 Six-Day
War including land in the
Rafid area on the southern
Golan Heights, and the Sy rian
side of Mt. Hermon which
will be turned over to a Uni-
ted Nations force. The de-
serted town of Kuneitra, cap-
ital of the Golan Heights, will
be included in the UN buffer
zone but Kuneitra will be re-
stored to Syrian civilian ad-
ministration.
Three strategic hills over-
looking Kuneitra and protect-
ing nearby Israeli settlements
will be retained by Israel,
sources here stressed. Israel
has agreed to return some
small villages and some
fields.
Nixon Wants Kissinger
to Continue His Efforts
WASHINGTON (JTA) —
President Nixon has instruct-
ed Secretary. of _State Henry
THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS A. Kissinger to stay -in the
6—Friday, May 24, 1974
Middle East as long as possi-
ble in his efforts to help
bring about disengagement
between Israeli and Syrian
The Detroit Chapter
forces, the White House said
Tuesday. The President's in-
American Jewish Committee
structions came in his com-
munication earlier Tuesday
cordially invites you
with Kissinger who reported
"good progress" in the nego-
to attend the
tiations for disengagement,
White House Deputy Press
Secretary Gerald Warren
said.
"The President is pleased
the outlook is very good,"
Warren said. "Both the Pres-
ident and the secretary are
eager to make as much pro-
gress as possible." The in-
structions for Kissinger to
remain in the area is be-
cause the efforts he is under-
taking are of such import-
ance," Warren said.

(Continued from Page 1)
what was for a time inter-
preted as something having
gone wrong. Both sides were
reportedly down to the min-
ute details of the accord and
taking pains - that every
phrase and nuance is clearly
formulated and understood to
avoid misunderstandings and
conflicts in the future.
Israel Information Minister
Shimon Peres explained this
when he disclosed, to the sur-
prise of some reporters, that
the disengagement line was
still a subject of discussion at
the latest meetings here with
Kissinger. He said the Syr-
ians had raised some further
issues but these were minor
and did not necessitate an-
other meeting of the cabinet
to iron out.
Peres indicated that some
work has been accomplished
on other aspects of disen-
gagement such as the pris-
oner of war exchange, the
United Nations presence, the
buffer zone and limited forces
zone. He said these issues
were being broken down, into
"hundreds of details" that re-
main to be settled and which
will require several more
trips by Dr. Kissinger be-
tween Jerusalem and Damas-
cus.
Kissinger may leave the
clearing up of last minute

details to Undersecretary of
State Joseph J. Sisco and
Ambassador - at - large Els-
worth Bunker if necessary,
sources here said. Once a
preliminary agreement is
signed or initialed, the scene
will shift to Geneva where
Israeli and Syrian teams will
have to work out a timetable
for implementation.
The accord is expected to
be signed formally in Geneva
by the chief Israeli and Syr-
ian negotiators. Ambassador
Bunker and the Soviet repre-
sentative, Vladimir Vinogra-
dov, co-chairman of the Gen-
eva peace conference, are ex-
pected to affix their signa-
tures to the document at a
formal ceremony in Geneva.
Kissinger's desire to wrap
up an Israeli-Syrian disen-
gagement agreement this
week is matched by Premier
Golda Meir's desire to bow
out of office on a note of suc-
cess and hope for the future.
Her caretaker government is
expected to end its tenure
with the establishment of a
new coalition cabinet by Yitz-
hak Rabin.
U. S. officials said that
American "ideas" were pre-
sented to both Israel and Syr-
ia and that Israel had re-
sponded favorably in talks
with Kissinger here Friday.
Israeli officials are care-

Kissinger has been in the
Mideast 22 days, the longest
stretch yet away from Wash-
ington. Nevertheless, accord-
ing to Warren he communi-
cates with the State Depart-
ment on other issues and is
able to conduct other foreign
policy business.

Waldheim to Visit
Middle East Countries
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
— Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim is scheduled to
visit the Middle East early
next month, it was announced
here Tuesday. A UN spokes-
man said the secretary gen-
eral would visit United Na-
tions Emergency Force
(UNEF) and UN Truce Ob-
server Organization (UNTSO)
headquarters i 11 Lebanon,
Syria, Israel, Jordan and
Egypt. The dates of his visits
were not announced except
for Lebanon where Waldheim
will address a meeting of the
Economic Commission for
Western Asia in Beirut on
June 3. Following his Middle
East visit, Waldheim is
scheduled to visit several
African countries.
In another Middle East de-
velopment here Tuesday, Ca-
nadian Ambassador Saul F.
Rae presented a check for

$1,150,000 to the United Na-
tions Relief and Works Ad-
ministration for Palestinian
Arab refugees (UNRWA) for
the fiscal year 1974-75. Cana-

da's share of the UNRWA
budget is $2,050,000. The bal-
ance of about $900,000 will
be contributed in flour ship-
ments.

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Editor, Commentary

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Egyptian. Offers
Help to Nixon

NEW YORK ( ZINS) —
American-Egyptian relations
have reached a turning point,
judging from the offer by an
Egyptian c hie f, Salaam
Shenab, to give President
Nixon 1,000 Egyptian pounds
($2,500) to help in payment
of his back taxes.
In a letter, the Egyptian
official explained that he had
decided to send this offering
in appreciation of President
Nixon's understanding of
Egypt in its quarrel with
Israel.
Mr. Nixon thanked the
Egyptian for his gracious
offer but did not accept the
money, saying he had de-
cided he would cover his tax
debts on his own.

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