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April 26, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Federation Votes Aid for Detroit's Needy Jews

(Continued from Page 1)
Lion to be used this year
came after intensive study.
The study, made by a com-
mittee of volunteers and
JFCS staff professionals, re-
assured us in one way. It
found no case of anything as
severe as actual starvation.
"What did surface, how-
ever, was an evident need
for supplementary aid for
many of these people, who
are increasingly feeling the
crunch of inflation upon their
marginal incomes. This can
never be described as any-
thing but a most complex
problem.
"The action which we're
asking you to take today will
enable us to escalate our
services to people but it is
not a final answer," Mrs.
tackier said.
"This grant will enable us
to fill our obligations for the
immediate future, but we
need further study to provide
answers about the extent and
size of the problem involved
along with the policy defini-
tions which will guide our
agency in this matter," she
said.
After the unanimous vote,
Federation President Mandell
L. Berman commended the

.

governors on their action. He
acknowledged that the prob-
lems faced by the subjects of
the JFCS study were not
unique to Detroit.
In 1973, JFCS disbursed ap-
proximately $8,500 in relief
assistance. This was in addi-
tion to the agency's out-of-
pocket costs totaling $165,000
for maintenance services in
the realm of direct aid. In-
cluded in this category' are
housing relocation of elderly
persons and the subsidization,
When necessary, of their
rents.
In addition, provision of
homemaker service, counsel-
ing and auxiliary services
ease life for people unable
to be independent.
In cooperation with the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Wo-
men, Greater Detroit Section,
JFCS is involved in the
Meals on Wheels program,
which provides 10 kosher
meals a week to the homes of
37 people unable to cook for
themselves.
A small portion of the fund-
ing for JFCS comes from fees
charged to those it serves.
The fees are determined on a
sliding scale according to
ability to pay.
JFCS also receives monies
from United Community Ser-

Israeli Academicians in U.S.
Ask to Return Home, Envoy Says

NEW YORK (JTA)—More
than a thousand Israeli
academicians who study and
work in the U. S. have ap-
plied in the past few months
to the Israeli Government
Bureau for Professionals to
facilitate their return to work
in Israel.
This was announced by the
consul general in New York,
David Rivlin, and by the
director of the Bureau for
Israeli Professionals in the
U. S., Eli Paz.
They added that the num-
ber of applications from the
Israeli -academicians and
professionals who wish to re-
turn to Israel has been grow-
ing in recent months and

that many of the applicants
stress their desire to work
in Israel, particularly at the
present time.
The Bureau for Israeli Pro-
fessionals is dealing now with
2,000 additional prospective
Israeli professionals in the
U. S. for whom suitable work
may be found in Israel.
Among the applicants are
many who have resided in
the U. S. for the last 10 years
and have been well estab-
lished. Rivlin added that the
number of the Israeli aca-
demicians applying for jobs
in Israel has doubled in
comparison with the number
of applicants prior to the
Yom Kippur War.

Generosity of Local Jewry
Recorded in One Day's Giving

(Continued from Page 1)
To those who still owe $400
and more on their pledges,
received in their billings,
they issued extra appeals for
immediate cash.
To speed the needed collec-
tions, telethons will be con-
ducted next week, and special
telethons are being arranged
for the month ending May 22.
"Please do not wait to be
reached by telethon solicita-
tions for cash payments and
make your remittances speed-
ily," Berry and Sherr plead-
ed in their message to the
community.
Telethons held at the United
H e b r e w Schools building
made personal contacts with
contributors, asking Cnem for
cash payments, in lull or in
part, to provide the support
needed for Israel.
Manning t h e telephones
were campaign leaders and
workers in the trades and
professional divisions. Berry
and Sherr were enthusiastic
about the response, corn-
menting that "Several of our
workers remarked that peo-
ple actually thanked them for
the call and promised checks

in the mail the following
day."
The telethons continu e
next week, with workers from
the women's, junior and met-
ropolitan divisions scheduled
to make calls.
Berry said, "We hope to
talk with everyone on our list
so they can be told on a one-
to-one basis how crucial this
drive for cash is!"

Four Sentenced
for Mission Attack

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
Four youthful Jewish of-
fenders, found guilty of fir-
ing Christian missions in Is-
rael, have been sentenced.
Two of the convicted quar-
tet are American girls, Faige
Teumim and Pepi Traub,
both Hebrew University -stu-
dents each of whom drew a
sentence of 18 months im-
prisonment.
A 17 - year - old sabr a,
Shmuel Gad, was also jailed
for 18 months, while a 16-
year-old Israeli, whose name
was withheld, received a
nine-month jail terfn.

vices, the communal agency
responsible for allocating
funds to the majority of the
beneficiaries o f Detroit's
United Foundation. The Jew-
ish Welfare Federation funds
are allocated to subsidize
agency costs which are not
paid for by other sources of
income.
Berman said, following the
meeting, "F e d er a ti on is
pleased to be •able to provide
this additional funding to our
family agency, JFCS. We are
aware of the problems facing
people, particularly those on
fixed and limited incomes, as
they combat inflationary
costs and strive to maintain
dignity in their lives."

6—Friday, April 26, 1974

`Israel in Song' • Has 90 Favorites

NEW YORK — The Board
of Jewish Education of
Greater New York and Tara
Publications have released
an extensive collection of Is-
raeli songs, "Israel in Song."
Compiled and edited by
Velvel Pasternak, the book
contains 90 of Israel's best-
loved melodies, from classics
to new favorites.
Children and adults will be
able to learn these melodies
from easy-to-read music,
rather than from individual
song sheets or by rote. The
book contains translitera-
tions, capsule English trans-
lations and a full-voweled
Hebrew text accompanying
each song.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Automatic Printing

They may be ordered at
$5.95 from the Board of Jew-
ish Education, 426 W. 58th,
New York 10019.

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