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March 29, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

State Department Blamed
for Human Rights Insensitivity

(Continued from Page 1)
members, however, declined
to accept all or part of the
report.
The report stated, in part:
"The State Department too
often has taken the position
that human rights is a do-
mestic matter and not a rele-
vant factor in determining
bilateral relations. When
charges of serious violations
of human rights do occur, the
most the department is likely
to do is make private in-
quiries and low-keyed appeals
4 rk the government concerned.
is rarely known whether
-..Liese acts of quiet diplomacy
have desirable effects."
The report continued, "The
effectiveness of quiet diplo-
macy would obviously be en-
hanced were the government
concerned to realize that
' other actions with more seri-
ous effects would take place
if quiet diplomacy failed to

bring results. Such actions
could include public con-
demnation of the violations,
raising the matter before an
appropriate organ or agency
of the United Nations, sus-
pension of military assist-
ance or sales and suspension
of economic assistance."
"Soviet leaders are not in-
sensitive to international
pressures on human rights,
as can be seen in the com-
mutation of death sentences
for the Leningrad hijackers
and increased emigration of
Soviet Jews for example."
In its recommendations, the
report said "While pursuing
the objectives of detente, the
United States should be forth-
right in denouncing Soviet
violations of human rights
and should raise the priority
of the human rights factor
particularly with regard to
policy decisions not directly
related to national security."
The report said that "The
Senate's failure to ratify the
genocide convention means
that we have yet to accept
international legal responsi-
bility for the most heinous
of human rights violations.
It jeopardizes U.S. leadership
and influence in the field of
international human rights."
Dissenting views were pre-
sented by two Republican
members of the subcommit-
tee, Reps. H. R. Gross of
Iowa and Edward J. Der-
winski of Illinois and by
Democrat H. L. FoUntaine of
North Carolina.

Deaths of Syrian Jewish Women
Bring Protest at UN Mission

NEW YORK (JTA)—Abotit
50 persons marched to the
Syrian UN mission in a teem-
ing rain on March 21 and
staged a vigil there to pro-
test the recent murders of
four Jewish women in Syria
and the continued persecu-
tion of Syrian Jews.
The marchers carried cof-
fins and signs reading, "Free
Syrian Jews," and "Murders
in Damascus."
It was organized by the
American Sephardi Federa-
tion in cooperation with the
American Zionist Federation
and the Greater New York
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
In Paris some 100 French
youths demonstrated in front
of the Syrian Arab airlines
office here to protest what
they called "the odious mur-
der by the anti-Semitic Syrian
authorities" of four young
Jewish women in Damascus.
A special religious service
was celebrated last Saturday
in synagogues throughout
France in memory of the four
women.
Meanwhile, in Tel Aviv the
families of the 65 Israeli
prisoners of war in Syria re-
ceived their first letters Mon-
day night. They were written
in Hebrew on Red Cross
for ms and were brought
from Damascus by a Red
Cross representative. They
were immediately delivered,
despite the late hour, to the
addressed-homes by couriers
from the army manpower

division.
munications received by the
POW families from their
sons. Last month, the Red
Cross delivered only forms
on which each prisoner had
signed his name. Monday
night it was letters. They
were brief but each prisoner
said his condition was satis-
factory. Wounded prisoners
said they were confident
they would recover and be
home soon.
The POW families, though
overjoyed by the letters, are
becoming increasingly re-
stive over the delay in af-
fecting a POW exchange ir-
respective of disengagement
negotiations with Syria. They
demanded that wounded pri-
soners be returned home
forthwith and that the bodies
of 15 Israeli soldiers who
died in prison, according to
the Syrian Ministry of War,
be returned to Israel imme-
diately for burial.
The families also are ask-
ing that matzot and other
Passover foods be delivered
to the POWs so that they can
have some sort of seder dur-
ing Passover next month.

Friday, March 29, 1974-5

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Rothschild-Financed Bridge Opens in Rio

RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) London banker. His contri-
— A bridge, 14 kilometers bution amounted to almost
long, over the Guanabara $100,00000.
Bay linking Rio de Janeiro
with the city of Niteroi, was
opened to vehicular traffic.
The bridge, whose con-
struction began in November
1968, was largely financed
by Leopold Rothschild, the

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JERUSALEM (JTA) —The
Knesset finance committee
discussed this week the latest
issue agitating Israeli society
— charges that President
Ephraim Katzir is spending
too mueh of the taxpayers'
money for his household and
personal expenses.
The charges, new to Israeli
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Haaretz charged that the
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president and his wife" and
IL 14,800 for "food products,"
above and beyond "food for
receptions," which Haaretz
claimed will cost some IL
50,000 in the next fiscal year.
The president's office ini-
tially had no comment on the
Haaretz article. However, a
statement over the weekend
noted that during the past
year, and particularly since
the Yom Kippur War, presi-

dential activities increased
considerably.
The number of delegations
from abroad calling on the
president is many times
g r eater than in previous
years, and Katzir has broad-
ened the scope of the presi-
dent's office, the statement
said.
Haaretz published a list of
alleged excessive expendi-
tures by the president which
raised many eyebrows here,
especially in view of Katzir's
frequent exhortations to the
public to adopt more modest
living standards in the wake
of the Yom Kippur War and
his stress on the need to
close Israel's social and eco-
nomic gap.
According to Haaretz, Kat-
zir employs six more staff
members than were ap-
proved; his office pays IL
1,100 a month to rent an
ap -artment for his personal
secretary; his office spends
IL 3,000 a month for flowers
"because the president loves
flowers"; and IL 50,000 a
year is spent to maintain
Katzir's home in Rehovot
where he continues his scien-
tific work at the Weizmann
Institute of Science.

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