100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

March 15, 1974 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Four Kishinev Activists Sentenced as 'Hooligans'

NEW YORK (JTA) — Fol-
lowing nationwide detentions
in the Soviet Union March 1,
four Kishinev activists were
sentenced to 15 days on
charges of "petty hooligan-
ism" for attempting to pre-
sent their cases to the local
ovir, it -was reported by the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
The four are: Yak o v
Shvartzman, Mark Abramo-
vich, Leonid Bendersky and
Sender Levinson. Two pas-
sersby, Miron Dorfman and
Yakov Starkman, were also
sentenced. The NCSJ also
reported that the wives of
_these activists planned to
stage their own hunger strike
Friday, "International Wom-
en's Day," a holiday ob-
served throughout Commu-
nist countries.
Dr. Isaac Poltinnkov of
Novosibirsk and his family
are in trouble, the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry re-
ported. The KGB came
to their home last Thursday
and read a document charg-
ing the family with anti-
Soviet activity which in-
cluded, according to the
SSSJ, provoking reactions
abroad, staging a hunger
strike at the central tele-
phone station in Novosibirsk
and giving information
abroad by use of the tele-
phone.
The charge sheet also noted
that members of the family
had been expelled from Kiev
after meeting with Jewish
activists. According to the
SSSJ, the Poltinnkov family
was told that if they didn't
find work in 15 days they
would be charged with para-
sitism. Such a charge car-
ries a sentence of one to two
years in jail.
Kiril Khenkin, a former
leading Moscow activist and
journalist .who emigrated to
Israel last October and is
now in the United States .on
a national speaking tour,
told more than 100 students
that a "wall of silence" was

again being imposed on
Soviet Jews.
Addressing a New York
area campus action confer-
ence at Beit Ephraim at
Columbia University spon-
sored by the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry, Khenkin
declared that "no one has to
be under the illusion that
things are getting better" for
Jews in the Soviet Union who
are seeking to emigrate. He
described emigration as still
"selective, restrictive and
absolutely unfree."
To protest the Soviet
Union's refusal to abide by
the United Nations Declara-
tion of Human Rights, the
Greater New York Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry and the
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry declared March 11-15
"Exodus Week." A series of
actions took place at the
Isaiah Peace Wall opposite
the UN including vigils, fasts,
studies, and readings from
the book of Exodus, the UN
Declaration of Human Rights
and appeals by Soviet Jews.
The plight of Valery and
Galina Panov was drama-
tized Tuesday on the occa-
sion of Valery's 35th birthday
by a rally at Plaza Square on
Fifth Ave. and 59th St. Par-
ticipants included celebrities
of stage, screen, opera, bal-
let and city officials.
A rally of concern was
held in London organized by
the British Committee for
the Release of the Panovs.
* * *
Christians, Jews Join
Consultation in Chicago
CHICAGO_ (JTA) — More
than 50 Chicago-area Jewish
and Christian leaders met in
the offices of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews here to study and act
on the plight of Soviet Jewry.
This Midwest Regional Con-
sultation on Soviet Jewry was
co-sponsored by the National
Interreligious Task Force on
Soviet Jewry, the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews, Chicago Conference on

Religion and Race, and the
American Jewish Commit-
tee.
In Encino, Calif., Odessa
Street, at the crossing of
Moorpark, was renamed for
Mendele Moher Sforim. The
ceremony was ushered in by
the playing of taps and the
unveiling of a papier mache
tombstone which focussed on
the slated desecration by Sov-
iet authorities of the Odessa
Jewish cemetery. Congress-
man Barry Goldwater and
other officials hosted the
event.
Mendele Moher Sforim,
famous Russian Jewish
writer, is buried in the
Odessa Jewish cemetery.
Purim. Observed
at Lerner Residence
LONDON (JTA) — Jewish
sourc_es in the Soviet Union
reported that large numbers
of Jews in Moscow and other
Soviet centers celebrated
Purim. One of the Purim
parties was held in the home
of Prof. Alexander Lerner.
Ten Kiev Jews sent a mes-
sage of Purim greetings to
Israel's president Ephraim
Katzir.
Novelist Outspoken
on Jewish Issues
WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Soviet prize winning novelist
Victor Nekrasov, who on
Monday in Moscow, de-
nounced official Soviet con-
trols on writers and litera-
ture, has also been outspoken

Baptist Church Group Sees Israel

NEW YORK — A group of
30 leaders of the American
Baptist Churches, U. S. A.,
was in Israel for a 10-day
tour to examine Jewish-
Christian-Moslem relations in
light of the tensions resulting
from the Yom Kippur War.
Among those on the tour was
Rev. Louis Johnson, pastor
of Friendship Baptist Church
of Detroit, a black congrega-
tion.
The tour was arranged in
cooperation with the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee,
THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS through its Christian Visitors
42 Friday, March 15, 1974
to Israel Program, and the
Israel Government Tourist
Office.
Rev. R. Dean Goodwin,
public liaison executive of
the American Baptist
Churches, said the Baptist
group will hold its biennial
convention next year, and
the findings of the study tour
group may contribute to
formation of a policy state-
ment adopted at that time.
Another group of 30 Priests-
journalists toured the coun-
try under the auspices of the
WITH
commission on interreligious
affairs of the American Zion-
JULES and MARY ABRAMS
ist information and organiza-
tion department.
News, Interviews and Beautiful Music
Among the guests were
Every' Monday, Wednesday and
editors and publishers of
Thursday, 9:00 to 10:00 a.m.
some of the largest circu-
lated Christian periodicals in
the U.S. such as Thomas
Benz, editor of "Ecumenic
Magazine" which has a re-
ported circulation of 2,500,000
and Art Armstrong, editor of
"Defender Magazine."
Armstrong said he intends
to return ti Israel next month
to produce a documentary on
"The Promised Land."
At the same time, seven
Canadian mayors are also on
tour by invitation of the min-
istry of tourism and El Al.
The delegation includes
Pierre Benoit of Ottawa,



ROZHINKES
mit
MANDLEN

THE JEWISH HOUR

ON RADIO 1090 AR

DiTRPITi
Na I NM
BRIM

RADIO STATION

on Jewish issues, an in-
formed source said here.
After the author had been
publicly reprimanded by
Premier Nikita S. Khruschev
for being too complimentary
to America in his hook, "On
Both Sides of the Ocean,"
following his 11-day tour of
the United States in 1960,
Khrushcehv's successors
lifted the ban on him. But
in 1969 Nekrasov again was
in difficulties for making a
speech on the 25th anniver-
sary of the massacre of Jews
at Babi Yar near Kiev. Dur-
ing World War II Soviet of-
ficial policy has banned the
erection of any memorial to
the Jews at Babi Yar which
is marked by a simple stone
that memorializes the site
but makes no mention of
Jews.
Javits
Jacob K.
Sen.
(R., N.Y.) has asked the
State Department to make
"proper representations" to
the Soviet government re-
g a r d i n g non-delivery of
cables and interruptions of
telephone communications by
Americans to Soviet resi-
dents. In a letter to Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kiss-
inger Javits attached "a list"
of 31 of more than 1,000 "un-
delivered wires" and also a
list of phone calls that "have
recently not been consum-
mated or have been consist-
ently interrupted in mid-
passage."

Gilles Lamontagne of Que-
bec, Steven Juba of Winni-
peg, Rod Sykes of Calgary,
M. Sears of Saskatoon, Henry
Baker of Regina and Jane
Bigelow of London, Ont.

Poale Agudath Israel
Seeks Religious Olim

NEW YORK — Poale Agu-
dath Israel of America is
seeking observant olim age
18 and over for Kibutz
Shaalvim and other religious
kibutzim in the Poale Agu-
dath network.
To promote religious aliya,
Yitzhak Hildesheimer and
Benjamin Luria, both of
Kibutz Shaalvim, are parti-
cipating in the Jewish
Agency's Aliya Month pro-
gram by encouraging young
religious families to join the
kibutz.
For on interview with the
shlihim, write Rabbi Schlomo
Rabinowitz, executive direc-
tor of Poale Agudath Israel.
147 W. 42nd St., New York,
N. Y. 10036.

AAJE to Seek Trends
in Jewish Education

NEW YORK—The Ameri-
can Association for Jewish
Education and the American
Jewish Committee will co-
sponsor a national workshop
here March 24-25 on trends
and developments in com-
munal education.
A select group of Jewish
educators and communal
leaders will examine models
in communal and other
noncongregational J e w i s h
schools. Participants will in-
clude communal school prin-
cipals, directors of local cen-
tral agencies of Jewish edu-
cation, federation executives
and representatives of na-
tional Jewish denominational
bodies.

Summer Institute at Brandeis U.

WALTHAM, Mass.—Bran-
deis University, under a
three-year grant by the Ja-
cob Ziskind Charitable Trust
of Boston, has established an
in-residence Summer Insti-
tute on Jewish family life
and history, to be conducted
Aug. 11-25.
The program is designed to
bring together in a campus
environment men and women
who have demonstrated their
commitment to the social
and cultural values of Juda-
ism as a vital force in the
community with scholars
who will provide a sound
base in history, philosophy
and the social sciences.
Brandeis President Mar-
ver H. Bernstein said the
programs will "provide lead-
ers of federations and other
community organizations with
extensive knowledge of Juda-
ism both as an historical and
as a relevant contemporary
concept in order to bring
greater quality to the fulfill-
ment of their leadership
roles."
The two-week in-residence
program, first of its kind at
Brandeis, will include semi-
nars on Jewish values in
family life, Yiddish literature
and current social and polit-

ical developments in Israel.
Directing the Institute will
be Leonard J. Fein, Bran-
deis' Klutznick Professor of
Contemporary Jewish Family
Studies and director of the
university's Hornstein Pro-
gram in Jewish Communal
Service.

A great many men have
trouble figuring out whether
they are facing temptation- nr
missing an opportunity.

OVER-
EIGHT

GIRLS and BOYS

7 70 17
IF YOU WANT TO LOSE 5 OR 50 LBS.

• Individual diets
• New Indoor Courts








Full Sports program
Indoor Gyr-rt
Olympic size swimming pool
Cultural activities
Winter follow-up
C.I.T. Program

• Pollen Free

CAMP SHANE

Ferndale, N.Y. 12734

Accredited APC ACA

Selma & k r Ettenberg
Co-owners/Directors
2026 E. 37th St., Box 18
Brooklyn, N.Y. 1123i
SEND FOR BROCHURE

4

914-292:4644 Ir 212-645-9112 Ir vN

ARROWHEAD

RANCH

Michigan's Finest Dude Ranch

BOYS & GIRLS 8-16

Emphasis in Horsemanship

MINIMUM 3 HOURS RIDING DAILY
ALSO Swimming - Archery - Tennis

ONE TO EIGHT WEEK SESSIONS
BEGINNING JUNE 30 to AUG. 24
Contact

WILLIAM MORGAN

After 6 p.m.

722-3921

YOUNG ISRAEL
CAMP STONE

MOSHEVET
El AKIVA

The director of Camp Stone
the overnight camp operated
by Young Israel and Bnei
Akiva, located in Sugar Grove,
Pa., will be in Detroit for
slide presentation and dis-
cussion with interested parents
and campers (age 8 to 15).

Date : Sunday, March 24.
Time : 2:00 P.M.
Place: Young Israel of Oak Woods
24061 Coolidge

for additional indormation contact Shmuel Barchad

544-1549

t

ill ■ „A-

A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan