100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

February 08, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

' - '17Finklisin the FOrmation of New Knesset: Who Get Chairmanships, Fronte eats?

BY MOSHE RON
Jewish News Correspondent
TEL AVIV — Despite dif-
ficult negotiating about the
formation of a new govern-
ment, it was believed that
the election of a new chair-
man of the Knesset and of
the new Knesset committees
would take place without any
incidents. But these events
also led to a crisis.
Likud members left the
talks on formation of new
committees and threatened
to boycott the Knesset presi-
dium.
The Likud faction has suc-
ceeded in increasing its rep-
resentation in the Knesset
from 32 to 39 seats and,
therefore, is putting for for-
ward more demands.
The chairman of the Ma'a-
rakh faction, Moshe Baram,
proposed a compromise by
increasing the number of vice
chairmen of the Knesset
from eight to nine for
Ma'arakh, three for Likud,
one for Mafdal and one for
the Independent Liberals.
He also proposed a de-
crease in the number of mem-
mers of the respective Knes•
set commission, from 19 to
15 and only an increase in
the number of members of
the security and foreign af-
fairs commission from 19 to
23.
The Ma'arakh demanded
the chairmenship' of the com-
mittees for security and
foreign affairs, finance, Knes-
set, labor and social prob-
lems.
For Likud, it proposed the
chairmanship of the commit-
tees of education, economics,
internal problems and state
controlled committee, but
Likud also demanded the
chairmanship of one of the
two most important commit-
tees: security and foreign
affairs or finance. Further,
this party also demanded
five vice chairmen of the
Knesset, instead of three.

the Monday Review

THE EXORCIST

by William Peter Blatty

A terrifying book
A terrifying film
An outrageous assault
on rational smugness.

A reading and cinema
experience which purports
to come to grips with
the forces of evil
incarnate.

What is the meaning of
the Devil?
What are the powers of
exorcism?

to be reviewed by .. .

Rabbi Sherwin Wine

MOn., Feb. 11, 8:30 p.m.

Admission Two Dollars

The Birmingham Temple

28611 12 Mile Road
E. of Middlebelt

477-0177

Ma'arakh rejected these
demands because in its own
interests it wants the smaller
parties — such as the Inde-
pendent Liberals, the Civil
Rights List and the Aguda
bloc—to be represented in
the sceurity and foreign af-
fairs and finance committees,

as prospective partners in
the formation of a new gov-
ernment, and it voted for
Israel Yeshaya hu to be
speaker of the Knesset, not
for the Likud candidate, Ben-
jamin Halevy.
When the Likud members
left in protest the committee

for the formation of the
Knesset committees, there
was an argument among
members of the remaining
factions, as to whether to
form the committees on their
own or to try to find a com-
promise acceptable to Likud.
There was another crisis

Coalition Govt. Talks On the Move

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Ne-
gotiations for the formation
of a new Labor-led coalition
government gained momen-
tum Tuesday as the contro-
versial "Who Is a Jew?" is-
sue was shunted aside for
the moment and the negotia-
tors concentrated on matters
more amenable to compro-
mise.
The coalition talks are prin-
cipally between the Labor
Alignment and its -old part-
ners, the Independent Liberal
Party and National Religious
Party. The Civil Rights List
headed by Mrs. Shulamit
Aloni dropped out of the coa-
lition negotiations Monday
after it became apparent
that Labor would not agree
to its principal demands.
The liberally-oriented fac-
tion, which won three Knes-
set seats in its first election
race Dec. 31, insisted that it
would join a coalition govern-
ment—only if it were granted
freedom to vote as consci-
ence, rather than coalition
discipline,, dictated on mat-
ters such as state and reli-
gion that have a diiect bear-
ing on individuals' lives. The
Labor Alignment, however,
considered Mrs. Aloni's de-
mands a breach of the status
quo and refused.
Her removal from coalition
talks has weakened the ILP
position. As long as the ILP
remains a possible coalition
partner, its negotiations with
the Civil Rights List for the
creation of a common parlia-
mentary bloc have been sus-
pended.
But the two factions con-
tinue to hold regular consul-
tations and are cooperating
on as many issues as possible
before the Knesset. The ILP
has promised to consult the
Civil Rights List before it
sighs any coalition agree-
ment.
Meanwhile, the Labor
Alignment's negotiating com-
mittee is meeting regularly
in the offices of its chairman,
Finance Minister Pinhas Sa-
pir. Sapir has deliberately
put off discussion of the
NRP's demand for a govern-
ment commitment to amend
the Law of Return in a man-
ner that would recognize con-
versions performed only by
Orthodox rabbis as valid in
Israel.
Labor leaders, including
Premier Golda Meir, have
stated categorically that they
would not surrender on that
point. But the matter is un-
der discussion unofficially
between Knesset members
Haim Zadok of the Labor
Alignment and Yitzhak Ra-
fael of the NRP. Rafael said
Monday that he was more
optimistic that he was last
week about the prospects for
a new coalition government.
Another issue under discus-
sion is the establishment of a
national security council or a

H

ministerial security commit-
tee, a cabinet-level body to
oversee Israel's growing de-
fense and security complex.
The idea is said to be sup-
ported by Sapir, Rafael, Gid-
eon Hausner of the ILP and
Naftali Feder of Mapam. But
it is opposed by Transport
Minister Shimon Peres and
by Zadok, who heads the
Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee. They ar-
gue that such a body would
split the cabinet between sen-
ior and junior ministers. The
matter is expected to go to a
subcommittee for recom-
mendations.
Another subcommittee is
presently studying the reli-
gious parties' demands that
the government ban autopsies
without the consent of the
family of the deceased.
At the same time, the Knes-
set approved the appoint-
ments of five deputy speak-
ers, eliciting a sigh of relief
from speaker Israel Yeshaya-
hu, who has been running the
House single-handed since
the eighth Knesset went into
session two weeks ago.

Yeshiva .U. Energy
Study Continues

NEW YORK (JTA) — In-
tensive research in solar cell
development and catalytic
activity has been under way
at Yeshiva University for the
past two years in an effort
to find means of alleviating
America's energy crunch.
Paul Raccah, director of
research at the university's
Belfer Graduate School of
Science, said the two areas
hold out the hope of more
energy than present devices
provide and at lower cost.
Dr. Raccah said that the
energy reserves . of the planet
earth are limited and that,
on the basis of present knowl-
edge, needs for energy can-
not be met beyond the year
2000. Short range solutions
are needed now to enable so-
ciety to survive in the long
range, he asserted.
The present problems of
using solar energy is cost.
One watt of solar energy
now can be had at a cost of
$50. The goal is to reduce
that cost to the area of 20
cents.
Dr. Raccah said that in
catalytic energy, fuel cells
involve a technology with "an
enormous potential" to im-
prove the energy supply, both
by increasing the efficiency
of fossil fuels and as a "sys-
tem component" in a post-
fossil fuel ecenomy.

Of eight things a little is
good and much is evil; travel,
mating, wealth, work, wine,
sleep, spiced drinks and
medicine—Gittin.

The five deputies who will
rotate in presiding over the
parliament are Mordechai
Ben Porat and Yehuda Yudin
of the Labor Alignment; Ben-
zion Keshet and Shneur Zal-
man Abramov of Likud; and
Pinhas Sheinman of the Na-
tional Religious Party. They
were approved without dis-
sent, but the Independent
Liberals, the Civil Rights
List and the New Commun-
ists abstained on grounds
that the five were represen-
tative only of, the major par-
ties.
Men's Club Federation
Opposes Change in Law
NEW YORK—The National
Federation of Jewish Men's
Clubs (Conservative) has giv-
en its support to the stand
taken by American leaders
of Conservative and Reform
Judaism in opposition to al-
tering Israel's Law of Return.
The present law extends
the right of immigration to
Israel to anyone "who is born
o fa Jewish mother or who
has converted." The Ortho-
dox seek to add the phrase
"according to the Halakha
(law)", which would dis-
qualify persons converted by
Conservative or Reform rab-
bis.
The organization, headed by
I. Murray Jacobs of Detroit,
approved a resolution stating
that the policy advocated by
Orthodox forces "could re-
open old wounds and endan-
ger the present solidarity of
all Jews in Israel and in the
Diaspora."

on a different question: Who
should occupy the first row
of seats in the Knesset?
According to tradition, one
representative for five Knes-
set members, sits in the front
row. Ma'anakh has 10 seats
but it was willing to relin-
quish one to the Independent
Liberals. Seven seats were
reserved for Likud, two for
Ma f dal and one for the
Aguda bloc. But Likud de-
manded eight seats. Rakah
also requested one seat for
its leader, Meir Wilner.
In the meantime, there is
no chance whatsoever of a
Government of National Unity
being formed between the

Ma'arakh and Likud parties.
Likud had voted against the
armistice agreement and
separation of force s, and
Ma'arakh sees no possibility
of corning to an agreement
with Likud on the continua-
tion of the Geneva Confer-
ence.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
6—Friday, February 8, 1974

rHARRY THOMAS

Fine Clothes For Over 36 Years

24750 TELEGRAPH

At 10 Mile Next to Dunkin' Donuts

SUNDAY 11 to 4

POTTE1 1

MOVING &
STORAGE CO.

One of Allied Van Lines Largest Haulers

1300 N. Campbell Road
Royal Oak

2253 Cole Street
Birmingham

LI 1-3313

MI 4-4613

PACKER • PONTIAC

STILL THE WORLD'S LARGEST

.

Come In

NO

For the Best Deal
on the New "74's"

RED STOTSKY
Call 863-9300

MILT LEVIN
Call 863-9300

18650 LIVERNOIS, SOUTH OF SEVEN .

Is building again to give you better service
DYNAMIC TIRE SALES Has Trained
Experts in
Exhaust & Muffler (repairs & replacement)
Front end alignment & steering parts
Brakes, Disc and Shoes • High speed balancing
Complete Inventory of Foreign and Domestic Tires,
Radial and Conventional
UniRoyal, Dunlop, Michlin, B. F. Goodrich

Feel Free to Use These Coupons

Good Until March 1

ALIGNMENT

1

Good Until March 1

$ 5

Camber - Caster - Toein

Air conditioning
Add $2.00
Torsion Bars S
Add $2.00
Foreign Cars Call for Quote

1

$ 5 I I

Use This Coupon
as Cash
For Any

69 9

I

te
ys ptle em
tire, sc tos m

I

4 E xh
system,
1.
Complete brakes a

Wheel balancing s 1=s

Conventional
Wheels

JOE STAMELL'S

DYNAMIC TIRE SALES

Monday thru Friday 9-6 — Saturday 9-3
N. WOODWARD, 3 blks. N. of 13 Mile Rd., Royal Oak
549 - 7350

Jra

.

Free Loaners

Dynamic Tire Sales +
Car Care Center






I

Open Daily to 6, Thursday to 8

JEWISH NATIONAL Fun

22100 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park, Mich. 48237

968-0820

OFFICE HOURS: MON.•THURS.,9to5;
FRI.,9104 ; OPEN SUN.10AM•1PM

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan