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February 08, 1974 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jewish Agency Appeals to World Jewry
for $350 Million in Cash by June 16

JERUSALEM (JTA)—The
Jewish Agency Board of Gov-
ernors meeting closed with
an urgent appeal to the world
Jewish community for $350,-
000,000 in cash by the June
16 agency assembly meeting.
The meeting was under the
chairmanship of Max Fisher.
Moshe Rivlin, the agency's
director general, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
the need for cash was "ur-
gent." He said the needs
were principally for immi-
grant absorption and for wel-
fare aid to Israeli citizens.
The agency's welfare and
health services to needy Is-
raelis have been affected by
the soaring cost of living in
Israel. Many new families,
their breadwinners in the
army for long months, have
joined the agency's list of re-
cipients of various aid.
The call for $350,000,000
in cash within four months
was an urgent appeal to con-
cretize pledges to met pres-
sing immediate needs. The
sum is outside the $1,250,000,
000 target set by the board
of governors to be raised
within 18 months following
April 1974. A separate
$1,400,000,000 commitment
was pledged during the Yom
Kippur War.
The United Jewish Appeal
and Keren Hayesod fund-
raisers will be approaching
contributors in the comming
weeks with two messages—
Israel's needs demand a re-
peat of war time pledges and
the Jewish Agency's present
situation demands cash now.
UJA executive vice-chair-
man Irving Bernstein said
the first four "jumbo mis-
sions" of some 400 people
each are to come shortly.
This is part of a "jumbo mis-
sion" program intended to
bring 5,000 Jews to Israel
in the coming three months.
Premier Golda Meir said
that Israel would not retain
Syrian territory it captured
in the Yom Kippur War but
would not negotiate a dis-
engagement agreement with
Syria until it disclosed the
names of Israeli prisoners of
war and permits visits to
them by the International
Red Cross as required by
the Geneva Convention. .
Referring to the Geneva
peace conference, Premier
Meir said that Israel will in-
sist that it be limited to
nations in the area. "Israel
will not conduct negotiations
with the Palestinian terrorist
organizations nor would it
agree to their participation
in the Geneva conference,"
she declared.
Mrs. Meir declared that
she would not accept the de-
mands of the National Reli-
gious Party to amend the
Law of Return so that only
conversions performed by Or-
thodox rabbis are recognized
as valid in Israel. "The de-
mand voiced by the religious
parties would sulit the Jew-
ish people in Israel and
throughout the world at a
time when the maintenance
of national unity is impera-
tive," Mrs. Meir said.
The Board of Governors
took up other problems some
of which are expected to be
resolved when the general
assembly convenes here June
16.
One of these is the elec-
tion of a new chairman to

succeed the late Louis Pin-
cus. Since Pincus' death last
A u g u s t, Jewish Agency
Treasurer Leon Dulzin has
been serving as acting chair-
man of the Jewish Agency
and World Zionist Organi-
zation Executive.
It was Duzin who stressed
that the new chairman should
be elected by the June as-
sembly, unanimously if pos-
sible, but certainly by a very
large consensus. He was sec-
onded in that by Fisher.
Dulzin also expressed con-
fidence that 85-90 per cent of
the $1,250,000,000 from
world Jewry would be rais-
ed by the time the general
assembly convened in June.
Fisher stressed that this
goal had been established by
diaspora leaders themselves,
not in response to Israeli ap-
peals. "This is our initiative
and our responsibility," he
said.
Dulzin said he expected
70,000 immigrants to arrive
in Israel this year and that
the Jewish Agency was bud-
geting accordingly.
Because income is not
known, the Board of Gov-
ernors has approved a three-
month temporary budget of
$150,000,000 pending consid-
eration of a full budget for
1974-75 by the general as-
sembly in June.
Dulzin said that Soviet
immigration was continuing
at a steady pace despite the
seasonal drop and that he
expected at least as many
this year as last year when
the Soviet aliya amounted to
33,000.
Dulzin reported that he
had personally inspected the
new immigrant transit facili-
ties in Austria two weeks
ago and found them quite
satisfactory in terms of effi-
ciency and security. The new
facilities replaced the old
transit center at Schoenau
Castle which the Austrian
government shut down last
Lear.
It was apparent that the
question of who will fill the
Jewish Agency-WZO chair-
manship was a subject of
considerable discussion be-
hind the scenes at the board
of governors meeting. The
post is probably the most
prestigious outside the high-
er echelons of government.
Many Israelis and overseas
leaders feel Dulzin would fill
the bill admirably.
He is considered to have
done a creditable job as act-
ing chairman since Pincus'
death and is actively cam-
paigning for the chairman-
ship.
The main obstacle is that
Duzin is a leader of the Lib-
eral Party, one of the fac-
tions cmoprising the Likud,
whereas the Jewish Agency
chairmanship has been a La-
bor fiefdom since the 1930s.
However, the reconstitu-
tion of the Jewish Agency
has introduced diaspora lead-
ers into its ranks and while
they are loath to interfere
in an Israeli sphere or in-
fluence, they have made it
known to Premier Golda
Meir that they expect the
Jewish Agency chairmanship
to be filled by a person of
the highest caliber.
Some diaspora leaders have
have suggested Foreign Mini-
ster Abba Eban or Deputy
Premier Yigal Allon, but

r

1,

i

this year's campaign to raise
51,000,000,000 in Israel Bond
sales.
He said the $1,000.000,000
goal "representing the big-
gest loan in the history of
the Jewish nation" was in-
tended to lay the economic
foundations for an Israel at
peace.
Rothberg announced the
formation of a "Prime Minis-
ters Club" to which persons
buying a minimum of $25,000
in Israel Bonds would be
admitted.
Before the dinner ended,
the "club" had its first sub-
scriber — James Ross of
Youngstown, Ohio—who said
that he and his wife were
buying bonds in the amount
of $2,500,000.

neither wants the job. The
name of Hebrew University
President Avraham Harman,
a former Israeli ambassador
to the U.S. has been ad-
vanced.
Knesset gossip has it that
Deputy Speaker Yitzhak Na-
von, chairman of the Zionist
General Council, is being
urged to forward his can-
didacy. But neither he nor
Harman are considered like-
ly to command the very
broad consensus that the new
chairman ought to have.
Fisher announced that Al-
bert B. Adelman, United
Jewish Appeal national chair-
man from Milwaukee has
been named chairman of the
absorption committee of the
Jewish Agency.
Adelman, a veteran cam-
paigner, is chairman of the
1974 UJA study conference
planning committee, vice
president of the UJA • and
a member of the Jewish
Agency Board of Governors.
In another action, the
agency's board appointed
Sam Morgenstern, an inter-
national manpower expert,
as a permanent adviser for
a new project to create job
opportunities for college-
trained immigrants.
Mrs. Meir: Disengagement
With Egypt 'May Be First
Cautious Step Toward Peace'
TEL AVIV (JTA) — Pre-
mier Golda Meir said last
weekend that Israel had
"dared" to assume a certain
amount of risk in entering
into its disengagement agree-
ment with Egypt "because
we belive that this may be,
and I repeat, may be, the
first cautious step toward a
possibility of peace."
Addressing 500 U.S. and
Canadian Israel Bond cam-
paign leaders at the closing
session of the Prime Minis-
ter's Bonds Conference, Mrs.
Meir stressed, "We must not
for a moment lull _ourselves
to believe that our wish for
peace means that we have
peace already."
Sam Rothberg, general
chairman of the Israel Bond
Organization who presided at
the closing dinner, announced
that over $102,600,000 in
bonds, "a precedent-shatter-
ing beginning" was sold dur-
ing January in preparation
for the official launching of

1974-75 Budget Under Study;
Hiked from IL 20 Billion
to Record IL 32 Billion
JERUSALEM (JTA)—The
cabinet devoted several
hours sunday to what was
termed as "first thoughts
about next year's budget."
Finance Minister Pinhas
Sapir discussed ideas for the
1974-75 record budget, and
promised no economic slow-
down was in sight.
Details of the budget as
being discussed by the minis-
terial economic committee.
It is to be submitted by the
government to the Knesset
by March. The extent of the
new budget was not revealed,

but it is assumed to be more
than IL 30,000,000,000.
I

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

This year's budget was or- 110—Friday, February 8, 1974
iginaily set at IL 20,000,000,-
000, but because of the war
IF YOU TURN THE
was increased to IL 32,000,-
000.000.

In his presentation, Sapir
said the greatest portion of
the next budget will be for
security. The proportion of
security expenditures to the
gross national product rose
from 12 per cent in 1965 to

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(Continued on Page 11)

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