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December 28, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-12-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Russ Resupply of Arms
to Arabs 'Awesome'

(Continued from Page 1)

"Awesome evidence of So-
viet resupply of materiel to
the Egyptians was every-
where, the congressmen re-
ported. "From Cairo to the
Suez Canal the subcommittee
saw endless emplacements of
missiles and columns of
tanks, trucks and other mili-
tary equipment. There was
not a kilometer between
Cairo and the Canal that had
not been fortified."
The Egyptians had placed
great stress on deception in
the initial movements, and to
a great extent it worked.
"Israeli sources indicate they
were aware of Egyptian troop
movements on the west side
of the canal, but assumed
these were regular army
training maneuvers. Yet the
Egyptians were able to move
substantial numbers of
troops, perhaps 70,000 or
80,000, plus substantial tanks
and trucks, into the canal
area undetected," the report
said. Some cover was pro-
vided by construction of large
earthenworks, concealing ve-
hicles and personnel.
Details of the crossing,
said the congressmen, were
provided by their Egyptian
hosts in a booklet filled with
color photographs. Every
member of the subcommittee
received a copy.
The Israelis admitted to
the delegation that "they
were aware of the Arab ac-
tions of moving troons but
misread Arab intentions.
When the Arabs moved air-
craft forward, they assumed
it was to be in the defensive
cover of the SAM missiles.
When the Russians evacuated
Damascus and other areas,
they thought it was because
the Soviets desired to have
no part in the Arab action.
Actually, they now conclude
it was just the opposite—the
Russians had prepared every-
thing and were leaving as ac-
tion commenced."
Gen. David Elazer, chief of
staff of the Israeli armed
forces, said they had seen
the Arab preparation for war
but did not believe they
would attack. At 4 a.m. on
Oct. 6, he was warned that
the first strike would come
at 6 p.m. The Israelis started
to mobilize at 10 a.m.; the
Syrians and Egyptians at-
tacked simultaneously at 2
p.m.
The fact that the attack
came on Yom Kippur held an
unexpected advantage, the
delegation was told. Because
all Israelis were either at
home or at the synagogue,
"it was easier to contact
tact them than would other-
wise have been the case.
Many rabbis announced in
synagogue that men would
report to their units follow-
ing services."
"Historically," the con-
gressmen's report said, "there
have been three bases of Is-
raeli military strength: a
good air force, good armor
and rapid mobilization cap-
ability.
"This time the Arabs had
SAMs to counterattack the
good air force, incredible
quantities of antitank missiles
to counteract the good armor,
and a surprise attack that
took effect before the Israelis
could mobilize."
The delegation, who sub-
mitted their report to the
House Armed Services Com-
mittee, noted there were
, many lessons for the U.S.

`Russian Jew Cooks in Peru' Authored by Woman Architect

Violeta Autumn is a de- tions with charming line
scendant of one of the Jew- drawings which are not only
ish families who came to decorative but helpful in pre-
from the Yom Kippur War. Peru from Russia in the 1920s paring the dishes.
For one thing, it proved the and 1930s. The new settlers
"I've always given my rec-
need to develop alternative a 1 s o included immigrants ipes in a graphic, have-fun
energy resources—including from Romania and Bessa- way," she states. "Friends
rabia.
were amused and delighted
From the lessons Mrs. with them and suggested I
Autumn learned from her ought to write a book that
mother's cooking, which com- way."
bined the cooking in the old
Recipes run the gamut from
world with the Peruvian, she Peruvian, Jewish and
has compiled a 192-page cook- "Rusky" snacks, appetizers
book which she has entitled and breads through desserts.
"Russian Jew Cooks in Most of the main course
llIkasergas'
Peru," and which has just dishes call for inexpensive
been published by` 101 Pro- cuts: Beef Shanks in Peanut
ductions in San Francisco.
Sauce, Picadillo (minced left-
It is not a Jewish cookbook, over meats), Helzel (stuffed
but it contains the flavors of chicken necks), Anticuchos
Jewish expertness and many (barbecued, marinated beef
traditional dishes. The shrimp heart), Pelotitas (Jewish
can be omitted and the other meatballs in' Peruvian sauce).
ingredients ignored while
There are also a number
REP. LUCIEN NEDZI
selections are possible from of hearty, meatless dishes
most
of
the
other
recipes.
solar and nuclear power.
such as Polita's Malisnik,
There are the knishes and noques, jumus, pepain that
The subcommittee also
recommended that the House the varnishkes and leashes, use beans, corn meal, pota-
military personnel subcom- varenikes as well as Matzo toes, eggplant and other
mittee make an _ in-depth M 'e a 1 Bocaditos Nitos and vegetables.
study of the system of Israeli Strudels.
About the Russian-Jewish-
The uniqueness of this book Peruvian cuisine, Mrs. Au-
reserves, which proved its
is
that
Mrs.
Autumn,
an
arch-
effectiveness in mobilizing
tumn writes: "Immigrants
units on as little as 18 hours' itect by profession, has hand- create a chance condition that
lettered the entire work, in- is fragile in its permanence.
notice.
terspersing recipe instruc- The immigrant never loses
In requesting the U.S. to
his traditional ways, but he
make up for losses, the Is-
does assimilate the new, and
raelis " are convinced they Parleys at ac)}1,-,2),T:t
so manages to create some-
must prepare for the future to Go On as 213..tA
by developing a great deal
REHOVOT — Despite the thing unique which lives as
more firepower. They say emergency conditions still he lives and then is gone.
their doctrine must be based existing throughout Israel, This book is an attempt at
on firepower because they including the large-scale mo- recercEng one such moment
will always be outnumbered bilization of scientific staff, in history that happens to
in manpower."
Weizmann Institute research- tacte awfully good."
Simultaneous with "Russian
Although U.S. equipment ers are going forward with
was superior, Israeli leaders plans for seven international Jew Cooks in Peru," 101 Pro-
said, "the Russian equipment conferences and seminars ductions issued another new
cookbook, "Flavors of Hung-
was in massive quantities— during the coming year.
so much so that it threatened Members of the organizing ary," described as the happy
to tip the balance against committees report a flood of ending to a dramatic and
letters from overseas scien- tragic epic in the life of the
them."
The subcommittee conclud- tists, written during or after author, Charlotte Slovak Biro.
During her early lifetime in
ed that "It was the vast num- the Yom Kippur War, reaf-
ber of weapons provided the firming their intention of par- Budapest and family-owned
vineyards nearby, she had
Arabs rather than any ex- ticipating.
ceptional technical capability
that took a toll."
8 Friday, Dec. 28, 1973
THE DETROIT JEWISH t\l'EWS

collected family recipes c,f
three generations in a set of
notebooks. After World War
II, when she and her husband
attempted to escape Com-
munist Hungary, these note-
books were one of the few
possessions they took with
them. They were caught
crossing the border and im-
prisoned; when the prison
officials discovered M r s .
Biro's recipe books they as-
signed her to work as the
prison cook. In 1956 Charlotte
Biro legally left Hungary to
make her home in the United
States, bringing the hand-
written notebooks with her.

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all the electrici ty
use today.

You can't
can't take electricity
for granted anymore.
So use only what you
really need. After 9 p.m. and
on weekends is the best time.
By reducing daytime use
you can help save oil and gas
which are in critically short
supply.
Wait until after 9 p.m. to
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The 200 recipes, translated
into English and adapted to
American measurements,
comprise this new 192-page
book, which is profusely il-
lustrated with line drawings
by Linda Robertson.

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