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November 23, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Music to the Ears of Israel

Briton's Revealing 'Israel Diary'

Many revealing facts
emerge from the Yom Kip-
pur War. While Israel's posi-
tion is frequently denigrated
in unfriendly areas, the ad-
miration of many observers
becomes evident with time.

A rally featuring singing and dancing drew about 150
young people from 17 area youth groups on behalf of Youth
for Israel Emergency Fund. Four Southfield students, from
left, Debi Chinsky, Sandra Silver, Robert Newman and
Albert Salomon, organized the meeting at the 10 Mile Jew-
ish Center. Edward A. Lumberg, chairman of the school
campaign for the AJC-IEF, right, watches as the organizers
count the proceeds: more than $400. According to Lum-
berg, this is only one of the important contributions from
youth groups and religious schools in the area. Beth Jacob
School for Girls has contributed more than $1,000 to the
IEF. Other organizations making sizeable gifts are the
Michigan State Temple Youth and the religious schools of
Temple Beth El, Beth Shalom and Beth Jacob of Pontiac.

RAMAT-GAN — One day
several weeks ago a young
woman in Tel Aviv was noti-
fied her husband was miss-
ing on the Suez front. That
night was torture for her;
she tossed and turned until
she finally reached for the
phone and dialed a number
she had seen in that day's
newspaper.
A calm, soothing voice
answered, talked with her for
more than an hour, gave ad-
vice and counsel.
The voice—and the special
telephone number—was- part
of a new 24-hours-a-day tele-
phone counseling service —
similar to those successfully
undertaken in the U.S. and
other countries, but a first
for Israel.
According to Prof. Ben
Lappin, head of Bar-Ilan
University's school of social
work, who initiated the serv-
ice, it is the first psychologi-
cal counseling by telephone
attempted anywhere in war-
time.
The "Dial-in-Distress" pro-
ject, began with ads placed
in the newspapers and broad-

cast over the radio, notifica-
tion of public welfare agen-
cies, police and civil defense
authorities, and other social
agencies. Case referrals be-
gan immediately.
Help is provided around
the clock, and not only
through telephone consulta-
tions. Callers are invited to
come in, with or without an
appointment, for personal
counseling, or a social work-
er or psychologist is dis-
patched on a home visit.
Where indicated, callers are
referred to other agencies
for assistance.
Most of the phone calls on
the "hot line" have resulted
directly from the events of
the war, often triggered' by
news that a family member
or close friend has been lost,
or was severely wounded, or
is missing in action.
But what the phone calls
have revealed, according to
Prof. Lappin, is not only the
anxieties and stresses under-
standably resulting from the
war, but also the "emotional
strength and resilience of
the Jewish people."

Oneness of Jewish People Seen
by Detroiters' Friend, Vinitskv

Chaim Vinitsky, director-
general of the United Jewish
Appeal office in Jerusalem,
in a deeply moving letter ad-
dressed to The Jewish News,
described Israel's spon-
taneous mobilization for the
nation's defense commencing
with the afternoon of Yom
Kippur.
At the same time, he told
of the continuing settlement
of new arrivals in Israel and
the uninterrupted emigration
from the Soviet Union.

Vinitsky, known to many
thousands of Americans who
have toured Israel and who
conferred with him in behalf
of UJA, gave these impres-
sions of the occurrences dur-
ing the tense weeks of the
war:
"Although we are a far
6,000 miles apart — and in
other parts of the world in
which Jews are living, a still
greater distance — we are
One. And it's not only money
— it's the way this supp2rt
is given. It's the way people
care about us and maybe
it's the way we do care about
them. Each one gives to an.

try is seen as an asset to and "anyone's bereavement
Israelis, for where else in is everyone's bereavement,"
the world can a soldier leave Mikardo writes.
the front lines and make a
- WE CAN. FIT 'YOU!
phone call to tell his family
he is all right?, asks Mi-
kardo.

Writing as an "Israel
Diary" in the New States-
man of London, Ian Mikardo
reported that to call up re-
serves quickly, the Israelis
have instituted a system in
which a radio program is
interrupted by short beep
sounds followed by a code
phrase, such as "pocket
spanner," "good meal" or
"steel hook." Immediately a
few thousand men are mobil-
ized at a prearranged point.
The smallness of the coun-

Bar-Ilan U.'s 'Dial-in-Distress'
Offers Counseling at All Hours

other what we have and we
can give.
"We, the people in the
rear, helped the soldiers. But
some of us feel that we could
have done something more
and not allow our children
to be the defenders .. . Per-
haps we may not be good in
actual battles — but we were
good (I feel so) in the edu-
cation we gave to our chil-
dren and the meanings with
which we imbued them. The
example we set for them in
the previous struggle for sur-
vival and freedom has
proven this to us in the last
two battles — that our won-
derful children understand
and they continue in the
footsteps of their parents."
"We feel secure because
they feel loved, appreciated,
wanted and needed and we
are waiting for the great,
great moment when we will
be united again and continue
our normal family lives —
take up the threads of our
work to fulfill our dream to
make a strong, strong home-
land for ourselves and for
those who need us and want
to come to us."

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, Nov. 23, 1973-5

'Arab Wealth
May Threaten
U.S. Economy'

WASHINGTON (ZINS) —
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff, in a
report to the Senate, said
that the Arab oil countries
will accumulate the stagger-
ing total of $100,000,000,000 in
gold and foreign exchange
within the next 15 years from
the sale of their petroleum.
"Such a fortune," said the
senator, "would be sufficient
to buy control of the U.S. in-
dustrial complex. It would
place the Arab world in a
powerfully competitive posi-
tion with all of the industrial
nations of the globe and
threaten the economic sta-
bility of the international
community."
Sen. Ribicoff urged that
s e r i o u s consideration be
given to counter-measures,
such as withholding the ship-
ment of manufactured goods
and food products and tech-
nical aid to the Arab coun-
tries.

Soldiers can reach the

••

fronts quickly, which may
account for their pushing

GOWNS
em
S-
L 7 to 129

RED
MAGEN
DAVID

NEEDS MONEY FOR
MEDICAL SUPPLIES

GIVE!

.

.LONG, SHORT, PATIO
- STYLES. SIZES 6 to 44

•L WEDDINGS, BAR MITZVA'S'
. PARTIES. SIZES 6 to 44

back of countless armed
forces from Syria, Egypt,
Iraq, Jordan, Libya and
Saudi Arabia. However, the
small country is closely knit

H ANDELS

154 SOUTH WOODWARD
BIRMINGHAM MI 2-4150

THANK You

MURRY

KORAN ADV.

WITH SOME
CAR DEALERS,
COURTESY
IS OPTIONAL.

At Glassmari Olds, it's standml equipment
It has to be. Or there wouldn't be a
Glassman Olds.
No, you won't stmll down red carpets
iind be crowned with laurel Nvreaths. But
you will be dealing with people who care
about people Auld not just Gu -s.
Simply put we want your business.
But we ails( want your go(xl will. And the
way we see it, the first follows from the
second.

Snow on Mt. Hermon

RAMAT HAGOLAN (ZINS)
— A crown of white adorns
the tip of Mt. Hermon which
long-time residents say is a
sign that the year will bring
rains to the region. But the
residents of the Galilees are
aware that as the winter sets
in, Israel's citizen army is
still on guard in freezing
temperatures near the moun-
tain-top.

OLDSMOBILE INC.

280(X) Telegraph at Tel -Twelve Mall
Southfield, Michigan 48075 • 354-3300

Every Day Is Yontif at Union Tire Save on Standard Gas

Use Your Standard or Any Other Charge Card

Plus Our Sensative Mechanics Will Take Care of Your Car

IF YOU LIVE IN:

BERKLEY, BEVERLY HILLS,
BIRMINGHAM, BLOOMFIELD,
FERNDALE,
FARMINGTON,

HUNTINGTON
FRANKLIN,
WOODS, LATHRUP, MAD-
ISON HEIGHTS, OAK PARK,

PLEASANT RIDGE, PONTIAC,
ROYAL OAK, SOUTHFIELD,
TROY, WEST BLOOMFIELD

Then it is definitely to your advantage to come to the 8 Mile & Meyer store

Tires Motor Tuneup Wheel Alignments
Shock Absorbers
Brakes
Muffler

The store is strategically located in front of the Shoppers Fair,
Farmer Jacks complex at 8 Mile & Meyers Rd.

The Grand River Store continues for the Downtowners

UNION TIRE CO.

3140 GRAND RIVER 10550 WEST 8 MILE ROAD at Meyers

(Next to Carl's Chop House)

Hours: 8:30-6 Mon.-Fri.
8:30-5 Sat.

321 -1 234

(Next to Holiday Inn)OAK PARK

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30-9 p.m.
Sat. 8:30-6 p.m.

399-7200

II

On East Side

CONSUMER TIRE CO.

31700 GRATIOT

in Roseville

ti

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