100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 09, 1973 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Family Practices Will Help Keep Jews in Fold, Professionals Told

"Many practices which a
family can adopt will make
it more likely that their chil-
dren will remain committed
to Judaism," Prof. Gerald
B. Bubis told 80 Federation
Fgency professionals recent-
ly.
Bubis spoke to the group
at the 24th annual Profes-
sional Staff Institute of the
Jewish Welfare Federation.
...;irector of the Jewish Insti-
tute of Religion-School cf
r?wish Communal Service at
Hebrew Union College, Los
Angeles, Bubis is known for
his extensive studies on the

-

pressures. However, it is
possible, even if' difficult, to
transmit Jewish practices
and values to children in
today's society," he said.
Some of his specific sug-
gestions for parents to prac-
tice in order to sustain
Jewish continuity are:
1) "Have a Jewish home
that has Jewish art, books, a
Jewish calendar, have a
home where the children can
feel Jewish.
2) "Live in an area that is
easily accessible to other
Jews, it's hard to live as a
Jew by yourself.
3) "Get a Jewish education
along with your children, a
child's Jewish education
needs reinforcement."
about their love for 'views.'
The institute, a day-long
It is a patriotic duty to look workshop, was held at the
over the bay and on clear Jewish Center. Social work-
days up to Rosh ha-Nikra on
the Lebanese border. The
visitor who doesn't have
many 'beautiful views' to re-
port is considered 'insensi-
tive': if he says everything
is beautiful they think he is
pulling their legs; if he
doesn't say anything they
think he is a snob."
But if we don't like Lind
for saying it. we must admit
that he is frequently right.
Right, too, when he says:
"The Arabs have never
seen so much prosperity and
employment, money and
business, in their own, their
parents' or their grandpar-
ents' lifetimes. Not surpris-
ing that the guerrillas failed.
The Arabs whom they want
to liberate from the Zionist
yoke are doing too well un-
der this yoke. The Zionists
brought a taste of America,
their promised land, into
their houses. Only in Ameri-
can movies had most Arabs
ever seen this dreamland of
bustling, booming, neon-lit,
eroticized fast cars along
boulevards, overloaded shop
windows, skyscrapers and
rich men's swimming pools
before. Only fools and fana-
tics would like to change
this vision back into what it
had been before."
If only some of those fools
and fanatics had read Lind's
book last month.
Lind agonizes over the
meaning of his Jewishness
and what it is to be a Jew
in the generation of the Holo-
caust and Jewish statehood.
It is a book that must be
read more than once. And
on the second reading it will
be more disquieting than the
first. Just the way Lind
would have intended it.
—C.D.

survival of Jewish identity
in a secular society.
He maintained that the
practices which he suggested
would "help reduce the odds
of Jews being lost through
assimilation and intermar-
riage."
The decrease of Jewish
continuity from generation to
generation results in growing
intermarriage and divorce
rates and increasing drug
usage among young Jews,
according to Bubis.
The modern Jewish family
in America "is pulled apart
by external and internal

Jakov Lind's Return

It is three years since
Jakov Lind's trip to Jeru-
salem. His 64-page memoir
("The Trip to Jerusalem,"
Harper and Row) is no less
incisive for its having ap-
peared one month before the
Yom Kippur War of October
1973.
The Austrian-born Lind.
whom someone called a "20th
Century Candide," made the
trip to Israel with some
trepidation. Twenty years be-
fore, he had left never
dreaming of return. Now, he
was a tourist from London,
looking at Israel through
sometimes admiring, some-
times disdainful eyes.
One tends to dislike him
when he writes:
"A visit to the new univer-
sity? It looks just like any
modern building in the world,
but for the Israelis it's some-
thing else. They mention it
with the pride of villagers
who have seen their first
water pump installed. If it's
not the university, it's the
location people send you to.
There's something Germanic

Bar Mitzvas, Weddings

and special occasio-, s

Garson Zeltzer
Photography

4

1



RE TONE

Tr"

JEWELRY

Remounting. Jewelry & Watch Repairin

SUITE 364 ADVANCE BLDG.
23077 Greenfield at 9 Mile
(313),.5577,1B§0

■ 1111 ■ 0

Caricatures

for Your Party

SAM By FIELD

( 399C -1320

YOUR CANDID COLOR

ALBUM
FINER
WINER

WILL BE

WHEN PHOTOGRAPHED BY

AND ASSOCIATES

KE 1 - 8196

LET ME SHOW YOU A NEW
DINEMSION IN PHOTOGRAPHY

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS Friday, November 9, 1973-33

ers, administrators, educa-
tors, and health and welfare
agency employes were among
those who met in small
groups after the keynote ad-
dress to discuss Bubis'
premises.
Others participating in the
institute were William Av-
runin, Federation executive
vice president; Irwin Shaw,
Jewish Center executive vice
president; a n d institute
chairman Dr. Morton Plot-
nick, Jewish Center assistant
director.

N

The Weintraubs

Invite You

to

- Danny

Martin

For Something Special

Watch and Jewelry Repair Service Center

JOE MILLER

Custom Made Jewelry

and

Specializing in 14 8 18 kt. Gold and Diamonds

HIS ORCHESTRA

Advance Bldg., Suite 354, corner of 9 Mile & Greenfield
557-5544
Mon.-Fri. 9-5; Sat. 9-3

Music For In Occasions

U 5-1244

n

We have a super collection
of luscious luxurious furs—
furs for any and every occasion
at'special prices to celebrate this
great, special event!

1'4; 'iorz

if*

Schostak Opens
Honeywell HQ

Schostak Brothers and Co.,
Inc. has relocated its head-
quarters to the 10th floor of
the Honeywell Center Build-
ing, 17515 W. Nine Mile,
Southfield (352-8000).
The move was necessitated
by the establishment and
growth of the investment and
development divisions and
the increased activity of the
construction department, ac-
cording to Jerome L. Schos-
tak. president.
The construction depart-
ment has contracted for in
excess of $20,000,000 in con-
struction for 1974, consisting
of garden apartments, con-
dominiums, high-rise apart-
ments and shopping centers.
The floor plan is arranged
around a central reception
and elevator station. When
additional floors are assumed
by Schostak, the present re-
ception area will also serve
the new offices.

RIGHT:

NATURAL BLACK GLAMA
RANCH MINK, FLOOR-LENGTH COAT
WITH ZIP OFF BOTTOM, TRIMMED
TIP DYED SABLE.

'U

CENTER: NATURAL BLUE

FOX BELLIES SHIRT.

LEFT: NATURAL GINGHAM
MINK PIECE COAT.

Known for fine furs since 1924

189 TOWNSEND AT HENRIETTA/MI 2-3775
OPEN THURSDAY UNTIL 9 P.M./ BIRMINGHAM

DURING THIS SPECIAL EVENT, WE WILL BE OPEN SUNDAY FROM 10 to 4, STARTING NOVEMBER Ilth.

Furs labeled to show country of origin

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan